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XXXVII 



PUBLISHED AT HOLY CROSS COLLEGE . WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Stephen S. Barone, Editor-in-Chief John E. Ryan, Business Manager 



THE 



HOLY 



CROSS 





a 




<& 






1943 



I 



n this, the Centennial Edition of the Purple Patcher, 
we have endeavored to submit to a permanent form 
the joyous years we knew at Mt. St. James. They are 
only a small chapter in the story of a hundred years; 
a story of a ceaseless battle in the cause of truth, a story 
of a tireless campaign for the production of Catholic 
leaders, a story of a constant promulgation of Christian 
ideals, the very ideals for which our country is now 
waging a valiant struggle. Truth, Christian leadership 
and Christian ideals — such are the traditions of our 
Alma Mater. To us, the Class of Nineteen Hundred 
and Forty-Three, the spirit of Holy Cress is a price- 
less heritage. 

These pages strive to revive the happy days we have 
spent in the assimilation of those traditions and ideals 
that are Holy Cross. 




»» 



Reverend Father John J. Reed, S. J 



For his sense of justice 
and devotion to duty; for 
his kind understanding and 
true love of Holy Cross, we, 
the Class of Nineteen Hun- 
dred and Forty-Three, in 
grateful appreciation of his 
tireless effort in disciplining 
us to be Catholic men- 
true men of Holy Cross — 
respectfully dedicate this, 
our final undergraduate 
publication. 



Now is the summer of our laughter gone, 

Scattered and shared, with our thousand small fears, 

Gone Pakachoag's chilled winters and winds 

And with them companionate study and tears. 

Now are we thrust in the winter of life, 

Death our one rest. Filled with brave fright, 

Naked and helpless, stripped but for truth, 

We wait the thunder of the raging world's night. 

Jettisoned, lonely, our hearts have one dream: 

The bells tolling softly , softly tolling the eve, 

The awe and the wisdom of high, stately Dinand, 

Peace on the Mount, for our hesitant leave. 

The clatter of Kimball, its thick-bodied shadows, 

Shakespeare in Fenwick, and crowded O'Kane: 

Let that dream linger, hold it in trust, 

For our long journey back, coming up Linden Lane. 



ADMINISTRATION 

and Faculty 



On June 21, 1843, four days 
after Daniel Webster's Bunker 
Hill Oration, the dedication cere- 
monies of the College of the 
Holy Cross took place. On the 
slopes of Mount Pakachoag, rich 
in legends of King Philip, Pr. 
Fitton and Bishop Penwick laid 
the cornerstone for the first Cath- 
olic college in New England. 
The first president was the Rev. 
Thomas Mulledy, S.J., of Vir- 
ginia. Under him and nineteen 
successors, New England saw the 
flowering of Holy Cross. 





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Very Rev. Joseph H. IV. Maxwell, S. J. 



PRESIDENT DF THE COLLEGE 




Rev. Joseph D. Fit z G e raid, S. J. 



DEAN DF STUDIES 




Rev. John J. Heed, S. J. 



DEAN OF MEN 




Rev. Leo A. Shea, S.J. 



DEAN OF SOPHOMORES AND FRESHMEN 



^■^ 

^ 



T^v^*^ 




Rev. Francis J. Hart, S.J 



STUDENT COUNSELLOR 



THE CENTENN 




VERY REV. JOSEPH R. N. MAXWELL, S.J. 

President 

REV. JOSEPH D. FITZGERALD, S.J. 

Dean 

REV. JOHN J. REED, S.J. 
Dean of Men 



REV. LEO A. SHEA, S.J. 

Dean of Sophomores and Freshmen 

REV. BERNARD V. SHEA, S.J. 

Treasurer 



Rev. Joseph D. Ahearn, S.J. Latin 
Clifford L. Alderman, B.S. (Lieutenant- 
Commander, U. S. Naval Reserve) Naval Science 

Olier L. Baril, M.S. Chemistry 

Rev. Paul F. Barry, S.J. Religion 

Rev. Henry E. Bean, S.J. Latin 

Rev. Thomas J. Biggins, S.J. Psychology 

Alfred V. Boursy, MA. German 

William F. Bowen, MA. French 

Rev. Bernard R. Boylan, S.J. Latin 

Rev. James L. Brennan, S.J. English 

Rev. Joseph F. Busam, S.J. Biology 

Rev. Raymond F. X. Cahill, S.J. Economics 

William A. Campbell, M.S. Biology 

Rev. William A. Carey, S.J. Religion 

Rev. Francis J. Carrol, S.J. Spanish 

James J. Casey, M.S. Chemistry 

George J. Charest, M.S. Cbe?nistry 

Rev. James K. Connolly, S.J. Physics 

Robert S. Crowe, M.S. Biology 

Rev. Patrick J. Cummings, S.J. English 

Joseph V. Devine, M.B.A. Economics 

James J. Dolan, S.J. Physics 



Rev. William T. Donaldson, S.J. 


Latin 


Rev. Richard J. Dowling, S.J. 


Education 


Rev. James L. Duffy, S.J. 


Economics 


Rev. John J. Dwyer, S.J. 


Latin 


Rev. John P. Evanson, S.J. 


Religion 


Rev. Paul W. Facey, S.J. 


Sociology 


Rev. Bernard A. Fiekers, S.J. 


Chemistry 


Rev. James E. FitzGerald, S.J. 


Education 


Rev. John F. FitzGerald, S.J. 


Physics 


Daniel I. Foley, S.J. 


English 


Rev. T. Lawrence Foran, S.J. 


Greek 


Rev. Henry P. Gately, S.J. 


Latin 


Rev. Florance M. Gillis, S.J. 


Ethics 


Rev. Leo J. Guay, S.J. 


Chemistry 


Carroll W. Hammil, B.S. (Commander 




U. S. Navy, Ret.) 


Naval Science 


Rev. Patrick J. Higgins, S.J. 


History 


Rev. John M. Hutchinson, S.J. 


Philosophy 


Remo J. Iannucci, Ph.D. 


German 


Rev. Joseph M. Keane, S.J. 


Latin 


George J. Keville, M.A. 


Education 


Gerald A. Kinsella, S.J. 


History 



IAL FACULTY 




REV. FRANCIS J. TOOLIN, S.J. 

Administrator 

REV. FRANCIS J. HART, S.J. 

Student Counsellor 



REV. CLARENCE E. SLOANE, S.J. 

Faculty Librarian 

JOSEPH A. PERROTTA, A.B., LL.B. 

Secretary to the President 
Executive Alumni Secretary 

RAYMOND D. KENNEDY, A.B. 

Registrar 



Rev. Harold C. Kirley, SJ. History 
Herbert P. Knowles (Lieutenant- 
Commander, U. S. Naval Reserve) Naval Science 
Joseph J. La Bran, S.J. Physics 
Paul T. Lucey, S.J. Mathematics 
Rev. William L. Lucey, SJ. History 
Rev. John M. Maher, SJ. History 
Thomas L. Malumphy, M.S. Biology 
Rev. Walter J. Meagher, SJ. History 
James H. Monagle, SJ. English 
Rev. David J. Moran, SJ. Philosophy 
Rev. Francis J. Murphy, SJ. English 
Rev. Paul J. Murphy, SJ. Religion 
William H. McCann, M.A. English 
Bernard W. McCarthy, A.B. Economics 
Raymond E. McDonald, M.S. Physics 
Joseph C. McGoughran, B.S. (Lieutenant- 
Commander, U. S. Navy) Naval Science 
Nicholas J. McNeil, SJ. English 
James T. Nelligan, M.A. French 
James H. Nestor, M.A. Mathematics 
Rev. Leo A. O'Connor, SJ. Religion 



Francis P. O'Hara, Ph.D. 


French 


Rev. Timothy J. O'Mahony, SJ. 


Philosophy 


Edward Peragallo, Ph.D. 


Economics 


Edward B. Powers, M.A. 


Mathematics 


Francis X. Powers, M.A. 


Economics 


Rev. John C. Proctor, SJ. 


Greek 


Rev. Joseph F. Quane, SJ. 


. Philosophy 


Rev. Thomas H. Quigley, SJ. 


Physics 


Raymond F. Quinn, SJ. 


Mathematics 


William F. Radle, Ph.D. 


Physics 


William J. Read, SJ. 


English 


John J. Ryan, A.B. 


English 


Rev. Joseph J. Shea, SJ. 


Psychology 


Rev. Thomas E. Shortell, SJ. 


Ethics 


Rev. Clarence E. Sloane, SJ. 


Psychology 


Rev. Harold V. Stockman, SJ. 


Ethics 


Rev. Joseph F. Sullivan, SJ. 


Ethics 


James J. Tansey, M.A. 


Chemistry 


Rev. David W. Twomey, SJ. 


Sociology 


John J. Walsh, SJ. 


Greek 


C. Julian Wheeler, B.S. 




(Captain, U. S. Navy) 


Naval Science 














Rev. Joseph D. Ahearn, S.J. 

Professor of Latin 

Prefect to Freshmen 

Rev. Henry E. Bean, SJ. 

Professor of Latin and English 

Prefect to Sophomores 

Rev. Thomas J. Biggins, SJ. 
Associate Professor of Psychology 



William F. Bowen, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of French 



Alfred V. Boursy, M.A. 
Professor of German 



J. Edward Bouvier, M.A. 
Director of Music 



Rev. James L. Brennan, SJ. 

Professor of English 
Prefect to Sophomores 

Rev. Joseph F. Busam, SJ. 
Professor of Biology 
Prefect to Sophomores 

William A. Campbell, M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Biology 



George J. Charest, M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Robert S. Crowe, M.S. 

Laboratory Assistant in Biology 



Rev. William T. Donaldson, SJ. 

Professor of Latin and English 

Prefect to Freshmen 



FACULTY 















Rev. Richard J. Dowling, SJ. 

Professor of Psychology 

and Education 

Prefect to Juniors 

Rev. James L. Duffy, S.J. 

Associate Professor of Economics 

Rev. John P. Evanson, S.J. 

Assistant Professor of Religion 

Prefect to Seniors 



Rev. James E. FitzGerald, S.J. 

Professor of Education 
Prefect to Seniors 

Rev. T. Lawrence Foran, S.J. 

Professor of Greek 

Prefect to Seniors 

Rev. Henry P. Gately, S.J. 

Assistant Professor of Latin 

and English 

Prefect to Juniors 



Rev. Florance M. Gillis, S.J. 

Professor of Ethics and Religion 



Rev. Patrick J. Higgins, S.J. 
Professor of History 



Rev. John M. Hutchinson, S.J. 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Prefect to Sophomores 



Remo J. Iannucci, Ph.d. 

Assistant Professor of German, 

Spanish and Italian 

Rev. Joseph M. Keane, S.J. 

Assistant Professor of Latin 

and English 

Prefect to Freshmen 

George J. Keville, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Education 

and Government 



FACULTY 















Rev. Harold C. Kirley. S.J. 

Assistant Professor of History 

Prefect to Seniors 

Rev. William L. Lucey, S.J. 
Professor of History 

Rev. John M. Maher, S.J. 

Associate Professor of History 

Prefect to Sophomores 



Thomas L. Malumphy, M.S. 
Associate Professor of Biology 

Rev. David J. Moran, S.J. 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Prefect to Sophomores 

Rev. Francis J. Murphy, S.J. 

Assistant Professor of English 

Prefect to Freshmen 



William H. McCann, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of English 



Raymond E. McDonald, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Physics 

and Mathematics 



James T. Nelligan, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of French 



Rev. Leo A. O'Connor, S.J. 
Professor of Religion 
Prefect to Freshmen 

Francis P. O'Hara, Ph.D. 

Professor of French and Spanish 

Rev. Timothy J. O'Mahony, S.J. 

Professor of Philosophy 

Prefect to Seniors 



FACULTY 












Edward Peragallo, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Economics 

Edward B. Powers, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Rev. John C. Proctor, S.J. 

Professor of Greek 

Prefect to Sophomores 



Rev. Joseph F. Quane, S.J. 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 
Prefect to Juniors 

Rev. Thomas H. Quigley, S.J. 

Professor of Physics 

and Mathematics 

John J. Ryan, A.B. 
Lecturer in English 



Rev. Joseph J. Shea, S.J. 
Associate Professor of Psychology 

Rev. Thomas E. Shortell, S.J. 
Professor of Ethics 

Rev. Clarence E. Sloane, S.J. 

Professor of Psychology 

Prefect to Seniors 



Rev. Harold V. Stockman, S.J. 

Professor of Ethics and Religion 



Rev. Joseph F. Sullivan, S.J. 
Professor of Ethics 



Rev. David W. Twomey, S.J. 

Professor of Sociology 



FACULTY 



Oh hear thy sons in happy song 

Holy Cross, 0' Holy Cross. 
Thy sons are loyal, true and strong, 

Holy Cross, 0' Holy Cross. 
Thy Purple banner floats on high 

While songs of praise swell to the sky, 
Thy honored name shall never die, 

Holy Cross. } Holy Cross. 




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SENIORS 



Those first years ivere difficult. 
The State of Massachusetts re- 
fused to grant Holy Cross a char- 
ter and in 1852 fire swept the col- 
lege buildings. But the College 
sprang quickly from its ashes, 
and the thunderous voice of 
Orestes Brownson led a success- 
ful campaign for recognition. In 
1865 the charter teas granted and 
ten graduates received diplomas. 
In that same year the Alumni As- 
sociation was formed, and each 
spring more loyal sons aug- 
mented its august ranks. 




H °LY CROSS CE 







Senior History 



Let's sprawl comfortably in an easy chair, light up 
a cigarette, and see if we can remember a few things, 
a few of the many things that happened to us at Holy 
Cross in four years. After all, they were four very 
important years — four years which will have a tre- 
mendous influence on us through our lives. Let's try 
to view them as a whole, and, remembering that the 
whole is the sum of its parts, try to fix in our minds 
a small portion of the memorable places and faces 
which belong to the years from '39 to '43 . . . 

We entered Holy Cross on a day drenched with 
sunshine, and with us entered a new Dean of Studies 
and a new President. They probably didn't feel quite 
so green and inexperienced as we did, but there was 
a feeling of companionship with them, then, which 
we have never wholly lost. The Purple Key helped 
us register. Jim O'Brien conducted a careful investi- 
gation of the O'Kane fire escapes. Most of us were 
living three to a room and loving it. We were intro- 
duced to Kimball Hall, the chapel, Father Hart and 
to each other — 410 of us. Father Brennan told us 
that we were only high school Seniors with a summer 
tan, and Father Martin helped us to remember it. 
Classes were a treat (how times have changed !) . Mr. 
McCarthy taught astronomy in Latin class, Mr. Hoh- 
mann corrected Boston accents in Greek class, and 
Mr. Izzo just taught — like an angel. Anthologies, 
radiators, and places on the varsity crew were peddled 
in Alumni. Jack McNulty, who later left to attend 
embalming school, smoked big cigars and serenaded 
his roommate with a banjo every night. Bill Doherty 
and Jim Nugent argued about Staatsburg at meals. 
Frank Mullins was appointed our honorary president, 
and Father Hutchinson gave us our first college re- 
treat. Howie Boyle won a radio in a pencil advertis- 
ing contest. Andy Carten proved himself a musical 
find. Tom Hoar roared up and down third Alumni. 
We went to bed every night at ten, and rose for Mass 
at 7.15. Bill Power made his mark in tennis, and 
Art Spellman made his in track. Jim Markham made 
the Purple. The Sophomores told us about the al- 
ready legendary Bill Osmanski. We played "Oh, 
Johnny" in the cafeteria until the walls wore out. 

The library, strangely enough, was in constant use. 
Dick Shults, Danny Gilmartin and Joe Kenneally 
were suspected of sleeping in the main reading room. 
Bud Hedges got a thousand games ahead at blackjack. 
Ben Singleton got an extra cup of ice cream at the 
Freshman Reception. 

Football rallies were packed that year, and we 
decked Alumni and O'Kane with banners before 
every game. The Freshman football team gave cred- 
itable performances. There were dances after the 
games, too, and Bill Diamond became well-known at 
some of the better Worcester residences. We voted 
against a proposition submitted nationally to college 
students as to whether the United States should enter 
the European war. Gene Lawless played Hamlet's 



mother to the hilt in Fenwick auditorium. Johnny 
Williams contended that the pen was mightier than 
the sword. Just before Christmas, Wheeler Hall was 
opened and Father Rector lectured on Hilaire Belloc 
to a Cross and Scroll audience. The Christmas holi- 
days arrived and we hurried home to tell the folks 
all about Holy Cross. 

1940 opened for us on an optimistic note, with a 
million-dollar fund planned to erect three new build- 
ings. Father Hubbard told us about esquimos, and 
Father Gillis assigned more outside reading. Jim 
Turner and Ronnie Cahill returned from the East- 
West game, and we helped cheer them home. John 
Hartcorn set a new college record in the 50-yard 
breast stroke. Father O'Mahony took over as Dean 
of Discipline for a short time and gave us two days 
off, when the snow piled up in Linden Lane. Dick 
Johnson and Dick Turner were admitted to the Pur- 
ple Key. Ralph O'Neil assumed office as Senior 
Chairman of Freshman debating. In April Vin Mc- 
Sweeney was voted in as President of our class for the 
first time, a position he has held ever since. Vin 
La Rosa wrote a song called "Those Little Things 
You Do" and it was broadcast. Tom McCabe took 
a feminine role in "L'Aiglon" and was promptly 
dubbed starlet of the year. Charlie Haskell and Bill 
McMahon wrote "The Escape of Ethelred" for the 
Promhaivk. George Kramer shook pepper on every- 
thing in Kimball; Roj Shea wrote plays; Ed Lynch 
took sunbaths atop O'Kane. 

We were moving close to the end of the year now, 
and Holy Cross fit us like a second self. The college 
had become a vital pattern in which we moved con- 
tentedly like strands in a web. Behind us were 
months of study and of introduction to learning. 
Ahead — 

Shades of Sophocles! The Greek play, carefully 
rehearsed, planned to the last detail, gorgeously cos- 
tumed and egregiously staffed, burst upon a waiting 
world in the middle of May. Tom Reilly sang loud- 
est of all in the chorus. Jim Garrity attended Creon 
with a gravity remarkable in Jim. Bill Cull and Jim 
Canarie executed majestic dancing measures with a 
grace worthy of a ballerina. Gene Lawless played the 
wayward Polyneices with convincing eloquence. Steve 
Barone mournfully told of the death of Oedipus as 
the Messenger. John R. McCarthy made a beautiful 
Ismene. "Oedipus at Colonus" was a smash hit, and 
we had a lot to do with its being one. 

Our first final exams came up shortly after the 
oratorical contest, in which one quivering Freshman 
had delivered his oratorical all. We took them in 
stride, cast a last glance at Linden Lane in the sun, 
packed our bags, and scattered to all parts of the 
country. The first milestone was past. 

The Society of Jesus was celebrating its four-hun- 
dredth anniversary as we returned to celebrate our 
first as Crusaders. Bishop O'Leary sang a solemn 



Senior History 



Pontifical Mass in Memorial Chapel, we unpacked 
our slightly worn trunks in Loyola and Alumni, Bill 
Quinn registered a minute before the deadline, and 
we were off on the second lap. Andy Natowich 
starred as the pigskin-pushers trounced Providence 
34-6. Warned about cutting classes, we flocked to 
them — for a week or two. We discovered how it 
feels to translate on an empty stomach a hundred 
lines of Latin for Father Dwyer. George Brantl 
learned about cows. Tom Higgins and John Gran- 
field went to New York for the N. Y. U. weekend 
and got lost. Margaret Sanger came to Worcester. 
253 Holy Cross men registered in the new draft. It 
was a year which began quickly, and those who didn't 
take a firm hold at the start found themselves sliding 
downhill. 

Father Gillis' Horticultural Academy was one of 
the more successful activities. Paul Doran played 
blackjack at least twenty-five hours a day. Packy Mur- 
phy dashed hither and yon. Larry Murphy burned up 
the fairways. Dave Murphy growled over Herodotus. 
Joe Murphy told us Chicago was at least as good as 
Boston, and his namesake gleefully described appen- 
dicitis symptoms to Bob McVay. Father Brennan 
sent down to the discipline office for more corridor 
slips. Joe Foley drew up a list of big-time operators. 
Kev McCarty took the Deacon on many a tour of 
New England. Don Foley tried to talk Tom Meath 
out of smoking a pipe. Dan Roche's table was 
jammed at breakfast. We sang "I'll Never Smile 
Again" until we were believing it. 

It was a year of speeches. Roosevelt went in for a 
third term, carried along on a wave of popular enthu- 




siasm. Father Rector talked in Kimball Hall about 
democracy and education, and how important each is 
to the other. Father Flanagan lectured in Kimball. 
Dr. Basch spoke at Worcester Polytech, and Father 
Quigley addressed the physics seminar. Father Bean 
spoke to his class rather frequently ; and in the dim 
recesses of the chapel auditorium Father Keating 
taught Frank Scavullo to sing. 

The death of Walter Hughes, '40, was announced 
in the Tomahaivk in November. A short month later 
Vin O'Rourke, beloved and respected "Uncle Vin," 
passed away, and not even Robert Speight and a 
Christmas banquet could make us forget the loss com- 
pletely. But the Christmas vacation ... a few days 
of class . . . and an epidemic of the grippe, striking 
with surprising rapidity and nonchalant disregard of 
academic seniority, brought us into a new year full 
of novelties. The grippe brought us a six-day holi- 
day, and for weeks afterward Lewis Cataldo wrote to 
supply houses trying to buy germs. ASCAP made 
war on the broadcasting chains, and "Jeannie with 
the light brown hair" was a nightly visitor on third 
Loyola. Jim Blakely collected pamphlets from Father 
Gallagher, and Ed Rafferty had "the strength of ten" 
in religion period. Father Reed spoke to an expectant 
chapel audience on Lourdes. Bill Larson kept us in- 
formed on world affairs once a week in "Cross Na- 
tion." Dick Dubord and Phil Downing made music 
the food of love. We took a short course in public 
speaking under Mr. McCann. Uncle Jack branded 
liquor as ruinous for youth. 

It was a year of social affairs. Joe McCann became 
slightly dizzy trying to take a different girl to every 
dance. Fran Kelley went to Regis and other places 
with the History Academy, but he liked Regis best. 
Jack Lore's station wagon was rarely empty. Marty 
Conroy talked about Irma, Palma and Alma in the 
midst of co-authoring a prize-winning one-act play 
with John R. 

Came spring, and Father Dwyer was busier than 
ever beautifying the grounds. "Richard II" thrilled 
large audiences, with Eric Reinders and Danny Gil- 
martin giving their dramatic all. At Worcester State 
Teachers College, Steve Barone and John Gahagan 
helped bring home the bacon in "The Valiant." John 
Weir and Kevin Earls were members of a winning 
Sophomore debate team. We marched steadily to- 
ward final exams . . . 

Those exams were rather important because they 
symbolized something ... a farewell to the classics, 
a good-bye to Horace and Sophocles, the end of rhet- 
oric, the end of English literature once a week and 
Mr. MacGillivray's poetic wisecracks. If we got 
through those exams we were on our own — we picked 
our own subjects for the most part next year. So we 
studied. Carl Fischer drank gallons of black coffee 
that week. Wally Haley plugged on chemistry, and 
Section A did speech outlines. Tom FitzGerald was 



Senior History 



more silent than ever. Matt Beecher, calm amid the 
storm, joined the Purple staff and wrote feverishly. 
Father Hutchinson called everybody a bad boy. 
Howie Boyle, who always planned things in advance, 
began wondering if he could take his junior oral by 
telephone. Len MacDowell went to bed every night 
with lights blazing around him. Bob Fullan showed 
up one day without a crease in his trousers, and we 
knew that it was an extraordinary week. Charlie 
Haskell proved himself an expert anthropologist at 
the History Academy banquet. Stan Rapinchuk be- 
came fatalistic about the Greek exam. Joe Carreira 
alone refused to worry. Said Joe: "Worrying, it gets 
you nowhere." 

Who was Edmund Burke? That question once 
answered, we were free for the summer. Last-minute 
packing was conducted with mosquitoes buzzing 
about and strange things happening in Europe. Al- 
ready we were moving closer to the war; in Wash- 
ington men were shouting "Isolationist" and "Inter- 
ventionist." We whistled "A Handful of Stars," 
thought about the sunny days ahead, and gave little 
heed to what Washington had to say. We were half- 
way through, we had reached the half-way mark, we 
had a new Dean, we had our youth, our optimism, 
our College — who could expect us to worry about the 
future? We left the Hill footing it featly, heading 
for the beaches and cities, more proud than sorry 
that sophomore year was over. 

Back we came for the third time, with a foreboding 
call of far-off drums and bugles in our ears. We 
brought summer tans and pictures of new girls with 
us. Braced and relaxed by two years of experience, 
we registered with scarcely a murmur and settled 
comfortably into rooms in Beaven and Wheeler. Na- 
tional defense was discussed, and the new N. R. O. 
T. C. unit was touched on, but the central topic of 
conversation was the L. S. U. game. Gathered in 
Kimball Hall auditorium on September 27th, the stu- 
dent body heard a re-creation of the game presented 
by the Purple Key over the public address system, 
through the cooperation of the Worcester Telegram 
and Gazette and a direct wire to Baton Rouge. Holy 
Cross won, and next Monday afternoon, thirty thou- 
sand witnessed a victory parade from Union Station 
to the campus, with Joe Logue at the head of the line 
astride a white horse and garbed in armor. Johnny 
Grigas was served nectar for the next week. 

Five philosophy professors undertook the difficult 
assignment of making us logical. Gene Lawless made 
his mark in the B. J. F., Frank Mackin joined the se- 
lect assemblies of the Purple Key, and the annual re- 
treat began under the direction of Rev. Patrick S. 
Foley, S.J. The Syracuse weekend was very much of 
a success, even though Paul Doran's car received last 
rites somewhere in the wilds of upstate New York. 
We read Vin O'Rourke's "By Right of Seniority" in 
the Tomahaivk and counted the number of '43 men 



who had gone into the service of their country. First 
Wheeler held delightful surprises nightly for the 
chance visitor, as Jack Quinn and Red McNamara 
gave free sway to an ebullient fancy. Ed Edwards 
left for greener pastures, and Jim Lynch succeeded 
him as Tomahawk sports editor. Sophomores awoke 
one morning to discover that they were no longer liv- 
ing in Loyola Hall — the Board of Trustees had re- 
named it Carlin. Four handball courts were con- 
structed in back of the gym. Jim Stanard promptly 
proved he was an expert at the game. Frank Cullum 
lectured to the Labor Academy on the Kearny Ship- 
yard strike and then went off with Jim Dooley to be 
a second lieutenant in Uncle Sam's Army. Johnnie 
Williams filled the post of musical oracle. Matt 
Beecher defended Peglerism. Len Chang always got 
the comics on Sunday mornings. We settled into the 
steady routine of classes, and began thinking about 
the minor logic specimen. But always there was a 
thunder of far-off guns in our ears, and a faint un- 
easiness which sprang from events in Washington 
and London; from chance encounters with service 
men; from our own semi-realization that our genera- 
tion had a special niche cut out for itself in the ring- 
ing changes of time. 

The United States — our country — declared war on 
December 8th, and immediately our whole way of 
life was changed completely and perhaps forever. We 
gathered in the caf, in prefects' rooms, in our own, 
and talked about the war. Father Rector spoke to the 
student body in a hushed chapel. Our schedule was 
accelerated; graduation for the Seniors was advanced 
to May 5 th, and it was announced that all our vaca- 




Senior History 



tions would be curtailed. We faced as best we could 
the bloody reality of a world at war. 

Father Yeddanapolli, S.J., told a Cross and Scroll 
audience about India just before Christmas, and then 
we trooped hurriedly homeward, wondering if we 
could squeeze in all the dates we had scheduled be- 
fore the 28th. Over the holiday information came 
by mail from Father Rector concerning the new Navy 
V-7 program. Willie Whelan, an authority on the 
science of the ancient Greeks, brought his chemistry 
up to date. As soon as we returned the Dramatic 
Society produced First Legion, with Steve Barone 
playing a monsignor like a prelate. Commander 
Wheeler became Captain Wheeler. Bill Larson took 
over the Tomahaivk at the end of January — the selec- 
tion had been a foregone conclusion since freshman 
year. Mike O'Neil was the beau of Beaven. Father 
Moran dropped books and wastepaper baskets all over 
the floor. Steve Willis had a chocolate frappe for 
breakfast every day. Father O'Mahony discovered 
one day he was teaching mathematics. Marty Con- 
roy and John R. interviewed Maurice Evans in New 
York and have called him by his first name ever since. 
Gene Lawless captained the ring committee. John 
Hartcorn admired the plot construction of our epis- 
temology book. Kevin McCarty started going to bed 
at night. Marian Welsh drew the largest audience of 
the year in Kimball. John O'Donnell and Len Chang 
discovered Worcester. Air raid precautions were 
taken; there was a short-lived movement afoot to 
make Dan Roche chief of staff. 

Steve Barone placed second in the Fred Allen tal- 
ent contest, playing two parts so well on the air that 




he was accused of using an assistant. Meanwhile 
defense courses were on the upgrade; Jim Stanard 
became a meteorologist, and Bob Gilroy learned how 
to fly a plane. John O'Toole helped whip W. P. I. 
for the B. J. F., and later in the year he was admitted 
to Alpha Sigma Nu with Larson, Barone, Chang, 
John R. McCarthy, Gilmore and Jim Lynch. Father 
Brennan collected more gum than in previous years, 
and Jim Coyle more records. Fran Kelley kept burn- 
ing up the track. Joe Shanaphy talked about the 
electro-cardiograph to anyone who would listen. 
Father J. F. X. Murphy lectured on freemasonry and 
assorted topics. 

All of a sudden it was April, and junior year was 
fast drawing to a close. Fathers Gallagher and 
Doody left to be chaplains. Paul McCusker worked 
hard for the Hellenic prize, and got it. Philosophy 
orals came up, and Ed Gilmore tied his wagon to a 
96. Pre-med students left for med school: Jack Lore, 
George Calvelli, Bill McCann, Leon Osachuk, Tom 
Kilfoyle. Departing Seniors served refreshments. 
The Baron headed three activities. Father Stockman 
congratulated the Red Raiders on an active year. 
Those who had seen the baseball games congratulated 
Ed Murphy on a successful year. We all congratu- 
lated ourselves on a pleasant year, and left for a short 
vacation, filing our cosmology texts carefully away 
and wondering how it would be possible to make 
8:30 class during the spring term. Another year 
gone! 

Senior year, which began on the 7th of May, 
brought many new things in its outstretched arms. 
Classes began at 8:30 now. Gradually we learned 
how to stay awake during that half -hour before nine 
o'clock every morning. The weather was warm, 
Wheeler Id's softball team won four games in a row, 
by default, and lost all the games they played, John 
O'Donnell bought a water pistol — and we were off 
on the last lap. 

George Shea and Bill Guiney were among fifteen 
who gave May talks; John O'Hara and Paul McCus- 
ker gloated over the prizes they had won at gradua- 
tion. Len Chang was elected President of Alpha 
Sigma Nu, and Jim Stanard guided the Cross and 
Scroll Club through a lecture series. 

The social season reached a climax with our Spring 
Formal, superintended by Dick Dubord. Shep Fields 
played and we all danced. Ted McCabe rumbaed 
like a dervish. Howie Boyle and Mike O'Neil begged 
for a chance to lead the band. Ed Murphy was con- 
gratulated again for having pitched the Purple to a 
victory over B. C. Kev McCarty led the trek to Bos- 
ton the next day, and Sunday we returned in a rain- 
storm with a lot of memories to be stored up against 
the future. 

Pictures were taken for the yearbook soon. Framed 
copies instantly appeared on the walls of girls' col- 
leges from coast to coast. Jack Ryan bought a 4y 2 - 



Senior History 



size class ring. Jim Fairclough went looking for a 
secretary to handle his correspondence. Pete Rogers, 
newly-elected secretary of the class, refused to co- 
operate. Bill McBain was appointed photography 
editor of the Patch er. Fran Kelley declared to 
friends that he was off grapefruit juice for life. 

As the summer vacation approached, we heard 
more and more about reserve units. We signed up in 
the Marines, the Army, and nearly every conceivable 
branch of the Navy. The war was coming closer and 
closer. It was revealed that 1,000 former Crusaders 
were in active service. Washington was a Babel of 
discussion about the manpower problem. We whis- 
tled When the Caissons Go Rolling Along and tried 
to forget about our draft boards. 

"Summer is icumen in" was quoted frequently 
during June. On July 3rd a total diaspora took place 
and was noted on several seismographs in the East. 
Ed Gilmore and Dave Murphy stayed for a week to 
work on their theses ( !) but the rest of us were hole- 
ing in at summer resorts and defense jobs. Bill 
Quinn got up a year's math at Springfield College in 
five weeks. George Dooley, who was a camp coun- 
sellor, held his charges enthralled by smoking a dif- 
ferent pipe every day. It was a lovely summer. 

The second week in September found us back 
again for the last time, wondering how the football 
team would make out under its new coach. Rocky 
Schambach chairmanned the first dance of the season 
and especially urged the 392 new freshmen to attend. 
The norm of morality became quickly a familiar 
thing. It was rumored that Johnny Williams was in 
the market for a taxicab. Ed Gilmore took over as 
Honorary President of the class of '46 at the annual 
faculty-student banquet. Dick Poulin presided over 
French Academy meetings. Ben Singleton became 
Patcher sports editor. Joe McCann helped the 
Yacht Club find smooth sailing. Frank Tomasiello 
cut more hair than ever. Paul Doran tried desper- 
ately to find a card game he hadn't played. John 
OToole ran radio programs for the B. J. F. Every 
Wednesday morning we trooped over to Memorial 
Chapel for a Service Mass. Tom Meath and Rocky 
Schambach joined the Purple Key. Andy Carten 
handed in his thesis, and four Seniors fainted. Paul 
Gleason and Fran Foley were accused by Charlie Mc- 
Nulty of sneaking off corridor nightly. Ray Ghelardi 
took pictures like mad for the A. A. 

The annual retreat, conducted by Rev. Raymond J. 
Kennedy, S.J., stressed the means of achieving true 
happiness. We listened carefully, because for many 
of us it might have been the last retreat we will ever 
attend. 

October was nearly over when Joe Daly became 
feature editor of the Patcher and Bub Natowich 
told Father Brennan that the name of Columbus' 
wife was Mrs. Columbus. Charlie Haskell was an 
expert on the Philippines for a day. The Sodality 



organized loud opposition to the State Birth Control 
Referendum, which was soundly defeated, come elec- 
tion day. The football team was having more downs 
than ups, but we continued to show up in the Fitton 
grandstands and cheer under the guidance of Bill 
Burke, Don Foley, and Buster Vocell. Bill McKone 
was elected secretary of the Aquinas Circle by accla- 
mation. The Purple beat the Tomahaivk in the an- 
nual football classic, but the Tomahaivk bribed the 
officials to call back all Purple touchdowns. Jack 
Ryan and Dick Dubord had a famous feud in which 
half the senior class was ultimately engaged. Red 
Quinn became a football hero overnight and stayed 
one, applauded lustily at mealtimes. 

The football season came to its close with — with 
the B. C. Game ! None of us who sat in those stands 
on the cold Saturday will ever forget Johnny Be- 
zemes' 67-yard run on an interception; or Johnny 
Grigas' plunges through the middle of the line; or 
Tom Alberghini's steadiness on the defense; or Capt. 
Ed Murphy's seven out of eight conversions. The 
score was shouted forth often that night at the Parker 
House, where John J. McCarthy was chairmanning 
the Boston Club dance. That night, too, came the 
horrible Cocoanut Grove disaster, and we heard the 
next day that Joe Boratyn, '42, had perished there. 

Thanksgiving . . . Christmas . . . exams . . . 
and good-bye. Our time is up, the fulfillment of 
our years on the Hill is at hand. We leave quickly, 
but soberly and sadly, to lay down the pen and take 
up the sword; and we join battle hoping that we 
will be worthy of our God, our Country, and our 
College. 








John E. Lavin 
Vice-President 



Peter J. Rogers 
Secretary 



Vincent J. McSweeney 
President 





Roland P. Schambach 
Treasurer 



Senior Officers 



VINCENT J. McSWEENEY 

President 

JOHN E. LAVIN 

Vice-President 

PETER J. ROGERS 

Secretary 

ROLAND P. SCHAMBACH 

Treasurer 




Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3; North Shore Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Peabody High School 
Peabody, Mass. 




Thomas Joseph Alberghini 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

9 Little's Lane 
Peabody, Mass. 



"Big Tom" . . . one of the solid stalwarts of the 
piling Purple line ... a terrific blocker, a savage 
tackier, a real team man . . . came up from Peabody 
with a priceless reputation . . . lived up to every bit 
of it in his first varsity year . . . went ahead to es- 
tablish himself nationally as a Junior and Senior . . . 
heralded with the likes of Harvey, Delaney, Daughters, 
and Zeno of the past . . . Massive, quiet . . . Tom 
always found time for a good word and a smile . . . 



practiced and studied tirelessly . . . Companion to the 
"Happy Horse" during Sophomore year . . . liked 
a good movie or a carefree chat after lights . . . never 
missed the midnight snacks on Third Beaven . . . en- 
joyed most the thick steaks of the training table . . . 
Enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserve . . . Three years 
a varsity performer on the gridiron . . . four years 
a team man on the campus ... a true Crusader . . . 
one of the greatest of the best. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4, Re- 
cording Secretary 3 ; Intramural Debat- 
ing 1, 2, President 2; Dramatic Society 
1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, President 4; 
Purple Pathcer 3, 4, Editor-in-Chief; 
tomahawk 1, 2; Aquinas Circle 4; 
Cross and Scroll 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity De- 
bating 3, 4; Lecture Debating 3, 4; 
Camera Club 1; Alpha Sigma Nu 3, 4; 
Intramural Sports 1, 4; Sanctuary So- 
ciety 3, 4; Mission Crusade 2, 3, 4, 
Associate President 4; Italian Academy 
1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; French 
Academy 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2, 
President 3; Metropolitan Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Li? Croise 1, 2, 3, Associate Editor; 
Collegiate Greek Play 1. 

Prepared at Regis High School 
New York, N. Y. 



Stephen S. Barone 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

182 East 111th Street 
New York, N. Y. 



Mr. Patcher . . . will probably live longest in the 
memory of Mr. Average Classman of '43 . . . possess- 
ed countless superlatives . . . constantly amazed us with 
his phenomenal memory ... it helped in exams and 
in after-hour bull-sessions . . . The one man who 
really had a finger in every pie . . . made it a point 
to belong almost without exception to every society on 
the Hill . . . and somehow ran most of them . . . 
Gained the positions of Associate President of the 
Mission Crusade, President of the Dramatic Society, and 
Editor of the Patcher almost simultaneously, but took 



it right in stride . . . His one concession to Father 
Time ... he resigned as President of the French 
Academy . . . Included in his repertoire French, 
Spanish, Italian, German, Latin, Greek, and a smatter- 
ing of English . . . called "Monsignor" by most of 
the Jesuit faculty for his work in First Legion . . . 
principal of Wheeler I bridge parties . . . Knew more 
students by name than anyone else . . . and they all 
knew him . . . Little Steve, a wonderful friend . . . 
seldom troubled . . . usually ambitious . . . but al- 
ways, a wonderful friend. 






Sodality 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4; Intramural 
Sports 3, 4; Glee Club 3, 4. 

Prepared at Richmond Academy 
Augusta, Ga. 







Louis Le Garde Battey 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

2229 McDowell Street 
Augusta, Ga. 



Lou . . . the gentleman from the South . . . with a 
drawl that made the feminine heart flutter ... A 
transfer from Augusta Junior College, Lou was only 
with us two years . . . yet his friends were legion . . . 
A member of the B. J. F. . . . didn't confine his 
debating to Wednesday nights . . . carried his foren- 
sic training over into his room, where he ably defended 
the South . . . especially beautiful Southern belles 
against all comers . . . Lou was equally ready to 
drop anything for a philosophical argument, or even 



a discussion on Einstein . . . Dependable intramural- 
ite . . . Beaven I counted on him in all sports . . . 
Lou was always ready with a helping hand . . . Sang 
with the Glee Club . . . but was heard at his best 
in the showers with the rest of the gang . . . Lou 
took advantage of every weekend . . . his heart was 
strongly drawn to Philadelphia . . . Principal peeve 
was New England weather . . . Lou . . . sincere 
and earnest in whatever he undertook . . . spread 
Southern warmth on windy Pakachoag. 




Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; North Shore 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Peabody High School 
Peabody, Mass. 



John Ernest Bezemes 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

23 Harris Street 
Peabody, Mass. 



Halfback on the football team . . . outfielder with 
Barry's Batters ... a star on any basketball court 
. . . featured the Ole 'Miss game as a Sophomore 
with his remarkable passing . . . posted an average 
that stood with the best baseball players as a Junior 
. . . then burned up the Northern League with his 
hitting in the summer . . . one of the best natured 
and most admired men of the class . . . Easy-going 
John . . . practiced hard . . . played hard . . . 
always the sportsman . . . Many knew Johnny the 



athlete . . . the faculty knew Johnny the student 
. . . astounded his profs in his philosophy Seminar 
and Oral . . . never let a book rest while there was 
work to be done . . . the pride of Peabody . . . 
proud of his city . . . always had to make time for 
an occasional weekend at home . . . constantly seen 
with Grigas ... an Athlete's athlete ... a real 
student ... a Crusader well worth knowing . . . 
keep going, Johnny, the way you marched on for 
Holy Cross. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4, First Assistant Pre- 
fect; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Dra- 
matic Society 2, 3, 4; History Academy 
1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission 
Crusade 4; French Academy 1, 2 ; Met- 
ropolitan Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Greek Play. 

Prepared at Bishop Loughlin Memorial 

High School 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 







James A. Blakely 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

130 Linden Street 
Rockville Centre, Long Island, N. Y. 



Meet "the Senator" . . . the "David I." of the Cen- 
tennial Class . . . Jim hails from Long Island, "where 
the fairest in the land reside" . . . Orator, debater, 
logician extraordinary . . . spokesman for his section 
since freshman year . . . Saw that the classroom never 
became dull . . . threw questions around like fire- 
crackers . . . what he didn't know he made it his 
point to find out . . . Known as "the Cardinal" in 
Loyola . . . caterer for the Midnight Snack Club . . . 
bane of Fr. Hutchinson . . . Kept fruit juice in his 



room . . . but "clarinet lemonade" was Jim's favorite 
drink . . . Will be remembered long for his im- 
mortal words in a certain class in Junior year . . . 
"Why, Father, I thought it was you" . . . Found in 
the Community Chapel on cold winter mornings . . . 
Vice-prefect of the Sodality . . .serious, but had a 
cheery greeting for everyone ... a future marine 
officer . . . from the halls of Pakachoag to the Shores 
of Tripoli . . . Jim will ride high. 




Intramural Debating 1, 2 ; Tomahawk 
1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanc- 
tuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Wisconsin 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4. 

Prepared at Fond du Lac High School 
Fond du Lac, Wis. 



Howard Henry Boyle, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

25 Champion Avenue 
Fond du Lac, Wis. 



My Melancholy Baby, the Gay Nineties and Ted Lewis 
spell only one thing at Holy Cross . . . Howie Boyle 
. . . Thought everyone knew about Fond du Lac and 
Lake Winnebago . . . argued long and loudly about 
Megalopolis and its doom . . . Steve almost left 
New York . . . posed as president of the Fond du 
Lac Club . . . being its only member . . . Won 
Fr. Biggins admiration by carrying on five-man de- 
bates all by himself . . . Could sit at his desk for hours 
doing meticulous work . . . always had that bottle 
of water there . . . and a slouch hat on his head 



. . . instructor in accounting labs . . . dedicated 
all his notebooks to girls . . . and he had many 
. . . Favorite expressions: "Forgit it" and "Don't 
talk loose" . . . Donned his St. John Berchman's 
server's pin whenever he went to see the Dean . . . 
Tried to get permission to phone his oral in from Wis- 
consin ... his favorite number was somewhere in 
Madison . . . Headed for Worcester every Tuesday 
. . . didn't believe in Saturday permissions . . . 
usually traveled alone . . . quiet and retiring . . . 
but Howie left his mark on class and college. 



Intramural Debating 1, 2, Secretary 2; 
Sodality 3, 4; B. J. F. 3; Tomahawk 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission 
Crusade 4 ; Labor Academy 2 ; Rhode 
Island Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at La Salle Academy 
Providence, R. I. 




John Joseph Bradbury, Jr 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

156 Sharon Street 
Providence, R. I. 



Good-looking, well-dressed, man-about-town . . . the 
quantity and quality of his wardrobe astounded more 
than one innocent onlooker . . . changed into new 
suits and combinations more often than Beau Brummel 
. . . Woman trouble aplenty until senior year . . . 
found what he wanted . . . will never forget the en- 
tanglements of the Providence College game . . . 
liked long weekends so he could go home for steak 
. . . always enjoyed a snack in the evening . . . 
Prolific letter writer . . . went few days without a 
perfumed epistle in his box . . . Concocted numerous 



schemes for making money . . . few of which reached 
fruition ... a great boon to cigarette companies be- 
fore and after exams . . . Famous for incomparable 
laughter . . . Joe possessed important information 
"from the inside" on all happenings of note . . . 
"Wait and see" ... In perpetual argument with Ray 
Curry over love affairs and other such matters . . . 
Ray the optimist and Joe the pessimist . . . intensely 
loyal to all things Holy Cross . . . Joe . . . the 
pleasing personality . . . the likeable, winning way. 




Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary So- 
ciety 1, 2, 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; 
Labor Academy 1, 2, 3; Rhode Island 
Club 1, 2, 3. 

Prepared at La Salle Academy 
Providence, R. I. 



Herbert V. Brennan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

565 Main Street 
East Greeenwich, R. I. 



From the shores of East Greenwich Bay to Pakachoag 
came Herb . . . brought a tint of Southern (Rhode 
Island) hospitality ... his frequent chocolate cake 
in no way lessened his popularity on the corridor . . . 
Last to retire and first to rise preceding an exam . . . 
could solve the perplexing problems of world events 
in true barber shop fashion with Canarie's assistance 
. . . Aided by the U. S. Government, Herb built the 
Naval Station at Quonset Point during his summer 
vacation . . . His valuable experience in the Narra- 
gansett Park Association made him the idol of the racing 



set . . . would haunt the theatres to listen to a big name 
band . . . Took a ribbing about being Jim Denehy's 
right hand man . . . could always get his tardy friends 
through the closed portals of Kimball . . . the only 
man who dared to oppose the tyrannical rule of Red 
Quinn on First Wheeler . . . Early in senior year, 
Herb followed his older brother, "Father George," into 
the armed forces . . . Wherever he may go . . . what- 
ever be his task . . . Herb will bring honor upon his 
Alma Mater and his class. 



Sodality 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Outing Club 2, 3 ; Labor Academy 3 ; 
Western Ohio Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Prepared at St. Vincent Preparatory 
School 



Akron, O. 




Joseph Daniel Brennan 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

112 Conger Avenue 
Akron, O. 



Happy-go-lucky "Doc" . . . charter member of the 
Racy set . . . and of O'Neil's Night Riders, with 
whom the night watchman had many a run-in, or 
rather, run from . . . "Doc's" terrific imagination 
was exercised quite frequently . . . (Originator of 
many novel sayings) . . . Big and husky . . . held 
his own through four years of intramurals and informal 
wrestling matches ... A great amateur cartoonist . . . 
was given to filling his room with lamps and unusual 
stands . . . and to reading books about horses . . . 



Wrote numerous letters and received answers on the 
prettiest baby blue stationery . . . always had many 
tall tales to tell after a trip to New York ... he 
was often there . . . "Doc" worried a good deal be- 
fore exams and more afterwards ... a good mechanic 
. . . often seen in junior year in a pair of coveralls 
tinkering with his car . . . starred on O'Neil's radio 
skits . . . made use of the faculty for his social con- 
tacts . . . remember, "Doc" . . . "Anything for the 
laughs." 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; History Academy 3, 
4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2, 3, 4; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 



Prepared at St. John's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Leo Joseph Bresnahan 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

2A Gilman Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



The Day students' typical Irishman . . . large in build 
. . . ruddy in complexion . . . possessor of the 
heartiest laugh in the class of 1943 ... In the 
antebellum days Leo used to be content with one or 
two activities . . . working behind the main desk 
in Dinand Library . . . or in a downtown market 
. . . Constantly seen in the company of Tom Sullivan 
heading for the Library . . . Always a Sodality man 
. . . elected prefect in Senior year ... in charge of 
Freshman mission collections . . . Tried to wear one 



hat through four years of college . . . would have 
succeeded but for a conspiracy of the paper bag brigade 
in the caf ... As befits his name, Leo was a lion . . . 
a social one . . . never missed a function in four years 
. . . spent his winters dreaming of summer and 
Hampton Beach . . . excellent athlete . . . baseball 
fan who could tell you every score . . . Entering the 
Army Air Corps after graduation . . . you'll carry 
the fame of Holy Cross far, Leo. 



Intramural Debating 2 ; Aquinas Circle 
4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanc- 
tuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Cru- 
sade 4 ; Labor Academy 3 ; Metropolitan 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Cheerleader 4. 

Prepared at Iona Preparatory School 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 




William Joseph Burke 



ACHELOR OF ARTS 

71 Elk Avenue 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 



Debonair Bill . . . wily native of New Rochelle . . . 
came forth to show a scholarly populace that even amidst 
the atmosphere of academic pursuits there still lingers 
the virile enthusiasm of living . . . discriminated 
between work and play . . . giving each its due . . . 
Steadfast, vivacious Bill . . . often seen plunging 
through the snowdrifts in the wan light of dawn on 
his way to serve early Mass ... or coming back to 
school . . . Rules were made for the rabble roost 
. . . Athletic prowess revealed in intramurals and 
especially on the handball court . . . played golf too 



. . . Clubby member of the Met Club . . . and of 
the Sanctuary Society . . . did more than his share 
of labor in the Labor Academy . . . At a crucial 
moment in his life was mistaken for a Yale man . . . 
a member of the "Paddock Group" . . . says he can 
be had at any time . . . Will always be remembered 
by the man who puts in windows . . . veteran of many 
a midnight jaunt with Brennan . . . Adios, "Bee" 
. . . it was a pleasure knowing one who made life 
brighter. 




B. J. F. 3, 4; Intramural Debating 1; 
Dramatic Society 1 ; Purple Patcher 
Business Staff 4; Varsity Debating 4; 
Lecture Debating 4; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Albany Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Poughkeepsie High School 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 



Francis Xavier Burnes, Jr 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

2 Loockerman Avenue 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 



Wherever good fellows get together, there you'll find 
the ever-smiling "F. X." . . . from the lordly Hudson 
to the lowly Blackstone . . . raconteur of many in- 
teresting tales about ye olde "Colonial" in his native 
Poughkeepsie . . . clever, industrious student, never 
lacking an idea or a gesture to explain it ... A 
"mixer" par excellence . . . lent life and color to 
each group he accompanied . . . along with Corrigan, 
Dubord, and Ryan, a member of the famous "back- 
field" of the memorable N. Y. U. week-end in 
sophomore year ... A charter Worcester-to-Albany 
traveler on the B & A . . . Strong believer in the 



Burnes health program, consisting of ten mile walks 
. . . the program lasted one day at the most . . . 
B. J. F. member in good standing . . . spare moments 
were spent in the arduous preparation of a WORC 
"fireside chat" . . . when one was over, he began 
another . . . Advocate of weekends and vacations 
from Washington to Boston . . . Shower-room tenor 
whose talent was overlooked by Mr. Bouvier, to Frank's 
great disappointment . . . Intramuralite, student, var- 
sity debater . . . Frank Burnes, a man of friends . . . 
a friend . . . and a man. 



B. J. F. 3, 4, Marshal 4; Intramural De- 
bating 1, 2; Aquinas Circle 4; History 
Academy 3; Cross and Scroll 1, 2; Var- 
sity Debating 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 

2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 3, 4; Mis- 
sion Crusade 4; Rhode Island Club 1, 2, 

3, 4. 

Prepared at La Salle Academy 
Providence, R. I. 







James William Byrne 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

63 Hilltop Avenue 
Providence, R. I. 



Known better as "Spike" . . . known best for his 
accomplishments on the Hill . . . one of the better 
and more active athletes in the Intramural Leagues 
. . . never missed a game . . . never failed to give 
his all ... A man of many abilities and a generosity 
that exhibited them unselfishly for the benefit of others 
. . . could always fill in as a fourth for bridge or a 
partner in a good fast set of tennis . . . Section A 
student . . . consistently mentioned on the Dean's 
envied list . . . habitually found his way to the 



Library and used it to the best of its capabilities . . . 
B. J. F. debater ... a member of the Sanctuary So- 
ciety's "Dawn Patrol" . . . Roomed his entire stay 
with Joe Bradbury . . . together they praised Prov- 
idence and all that it was . . . No one ever celebrated 
a football victory with more intent than "Spike" . . . 
no one ever took defeat more painfully . . . especially 
at the hands of Brown ... A true Crusader to the 
heart . . . we'll miss you "Spike" and the pleasure 
you have lent us by knowing you. 



*K^r^m* 




Sodality 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; His- 
tory Academy 4; Albany Club 3, 4. 

Prepared at Mount Assumption 

Institute 

Plattsburg, N. Y. 



Donald Henry Byrnes 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

19 Stetson Avenue 
Plattsburg, N. Y. 



Our historian from Plattsburg, N. Y. . . . entered the 
Cross in junior year . . . transfer from Siena College 
. . . possesses the drive that wins . . . doesn't know 
the meaning of the word "fail" . . . student of culture 
. . . shone in philosophy . . . Often found arguing 
with his pal, O'Hara . . . track enthusiast . . . cham- 
pion at repartee . . . haunted the P. O. . . . Quite a 
guy in his home town . . . marcelle wave a great 
attraction to the fair sex . . . five feet plus of blond 
good nature . . . Efficient . . . conscientious . . . 
started and ended every day with a visit to the Chapel 



. . . steadfast Sodalist . . . His success lies in insis- 
tence upon and enjoyment in doing things well . . . 
Conservative clothes . . . business-like appearance . . . 
we know he does more than just look the part . . . 
gave many helpful hints to underclassmen ... in re- 
turn for the Plattsburg Cross and Republican . . . 
patron of Kimball Hall on a Saturday night . . . 
Greatest source of relaxation: his pipe . . . spent his 
summers working in a laundry . . . Gentleman of 
dignity . . . affable . . . good-humored Don . . . 
a true son of Holy Cross. 



Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; French 
Academy 1, 2; Lowell Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Keith Academy 
Lowell, Mass. 




Eugene Francis Callahan, Jr 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

85 Myrtle Street 
Lowell, Mass. 



Lowell's diminutive worry-wart . . . managed to find 
relaxation in the jocosity of Reher and Art Murphy 
. . . rabid Yankee and Bruins fan . . . Reputed to 
be the only man in the class who stuck to One for 
four years . . . quiet . . . in a bombastic sort of way 
. . . industrious, too . . . but closed the books week- 
ends in deference to a trip home . . . From Lowell 
he brought the family product . . . Ice Cream . . . 
for those well-remembered fiestas . . . Found Sock's 
a welcome home for the empty of heart and stomach 
. . . supplied Buster with the antithesis to his ver- 



bosity . . . One of Tommy Sullivan's stalwart pro- 
ponents . . . Accounting was his nemesis for a time 
. . . later became more than slightly proficient in 
it . . . Favored gabardine . . . sported a wide and 
toothy grin . . . Gene . . . worried about "the 
times" and the girl . . . but never without a reason 
. . . Reliable, conscientious . . . one of the most 
cooperative fellows in the class . . . His years on the 
Hill were friendly and fruitful ... his future a certain 
success. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; History Academy 1, 
2; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Worcester Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at High School of Commerce 
Worcester, Mass. 



John James Campanale 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

576 Franklin Street 

Worcester, Mass. 



Mercury of Mt. St. James . . . one of Bart's stal- 
warts . . . came to the Hill as holder of the 440 record 
in the Worcester schools . . . seen daily in the win- 
ter, racing around the board saucer behind Carlin . . . 
grace of form ... A smooth dresser . . . made a 
good advertisement for the clothing store . . . Johnny 
was no stranger at social functions . . . displayed 
the charm and character of a true Crusader . . . 
sported a bronzed countenance gained working as a 
greenskeeper in the summer months . . . Constantly 



seen with le bon companion Tomasiello . . . Mr. 
Keville's right-hand man in the Education Course . . . 
excelled in History . . . argued Philosophy with 
"Hop" Riopel in the locker room . . . found that 
time had not dimmed "Hop's" memory . . . Kept 
the track team in trim with his father's wine . . . 
Aspires to a teacher-coach position . . . Keep up the 
good work, John . . . reaching the tape first in life 
will be just an old story to you. 



Sodality 1; History Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Puerto Rico 
Club 1, 2; West Indies Club 3. 

Prepared at St. Augustine's Military 

Academy 

Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 







Jose Rafael Carreira 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Caguas, Puerto Rico 



Host of the "T and T" . . . camp-follower of Geteen 
. . . with the light of the South in his eyes . . . 
played handball off and on . . . habitue of the caf 
and the infirmary . . . Joe was much more serious 
than he was given credit . . . soundly cynical . . . 
quiet admirer of Father Higgins . . . faithful mem- 
ber of the History Academy . . . made many a sage 
assertion at intercollegiate discussions . . . Main 
Street Lochinvar . . . floor-leader for the post-office 
Spanish forum . . . always had his hair perfectly 
groomed . . . favored long walks and short classes 



. . . had a wide circle of acquaintances . . . advo- 
cate of more frequent P. T. classes . . . Did a grace- 
ful Conga at proms . . . Talked enthusiastically and 
excitedly about anything in his heart . . . good fem- 
inine psychologist . . . told us about Puerto Rican 
girls, and American girls about Puerto Rico . . . 
Liked St. Vincent's . . . smoked with long, deep puffs 
and wide gestures ... a rugged individualist if 
there ever was one . . . didn't like crowds . . . Keep 
the light in your eyes, Joe. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 
1; Purple Patcher 4; Purple 4, Art 
Editor 4; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3, 4, Man- 
aging Editor 3, 4; Cross and Scroll 1; 
Intramural Sports 2, 3 ; Sanctuary Soci- 
ety 2, 3, 4; Boston Club. 

Prepared at Boston College High School 
Boston, Mass. 



Andrew Silvester Garten, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

30 Newport Street 
Dorchester, Mass. 



The boy who beats his chest at open windows and 
scares freshmen . . . Heaven's his destination, where 
he'll probably help Aquinas with his Ontology . . . 
pulled down 100% in the subject . . . Old Faithful 
. . . patient with his roommate . . . listened care- 
fully to third manuscript-readings . . . secret source of 
Coffee House items . . . Almost got a banjo wrapped 
around his head in freshman year . . . left it home, 
with his Boston accent . . . Fed third Beaven on his 
mother's bread for two months . . . takes short walks 
of ten to fifteen miles . . . likes waltzes, roller-skating, 



and tennis ... an artist with water colors or the 
dummy sheet of the Tomahawk . . . Learned scien- 
tific German of summer evenings . . . Likes to dis- 
cuss "life" after dark . . . wakes up cheery . . . 
We'll probably remember him with chest out, shoulders 
back, stomach in, striding resolutely forward, his arms 
stiff at his side . . . Spent more hours in lab than 
many did in class . . . owned a share of the Dean's 
List . . . Firmly resolved to be a good chemist, via 
H. C. and M. I. T. . . . and take it from those who 
know ... he will. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, Vice-Prefect 4; In- 
tramural Debating 1, 2; B. J. F. 3; 
Aquinas Circle 4; Camera Club 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Labor Acad- 
emy 2, 3, 4; Chicago Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 4. 

Prepared at Campion High School 
Prairie du Chien, Wis. 




Thomas Patrick Casey 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

8114 Merrill Avenue 
Chicago, 111. 



Mr. Cheerfulness himself ... a perpetual smile . . . 
a good word for everyone . . . "T," we called him 
. . . short in stature, but high in our esteem ... A 
man of varied interests and activities . . . B. J. F. 
regular . . . capable Intramuralite . . . also a Glee 
Clubber for four years . . . Punctual and dependable 
. . . Vice-Prefect of the Sodality . . . one of the 
"Dawn Patrol" who served early Mass . . . the 
human alarm clock . . . was usually asked to wake 
up half the corridor ... A quiet lad from the Windy 
City . . . Tom never complained . . . until "The 



Doc" came along in Junior Year . . . Roomed with 
the pride of Wauwatosa . . . and so was subject to 
many of that gentleman's brain storms . . . survived 
the ordeal, though . . . Studied long and constantly 
. . . and sought relaxation in weekends with Haley 
. . . won't soon forget that trip to Maine . . . An 
expert at punching the bag . . . maybe Tom had 
his eye on the welterweight crown . . . Showed the 
sights of Chicago to many a visiting classmate . . . 
Best of luck, Tommy . . . and don't lose that friendly 
disposition. 




Intramural Debating 2 ; Scientific Soci- 
ety 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. 4. 

Prepared at Franklin High School 
Franklin, Mass. 



Lewis Joseph Cataldo, Jr 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

103 Washington Street 
Franklin, Mass. 



Big Lew . . . prankster of Wheeler I . . . tormented 
Fallon or any other innocent bystander . . . some- 
times had to take it . . . did that well, too . . . 
Biology was his field ... he took it by storm . . . 
Argued incessantly with Wright . . . boosted home 
town Franklin and the Red Sox . . . Absent-minded 
Lew . . . "I can't remember where I left it" . . . 
posted a reward for a lost watch . . . found it three 
days later in his bathrobe pocket . . . Borrowed a 
towel from a neighboring room in Freshman year 



returned it in Junior year . . . Favorite pastimes: 
fishing, bridge, corridor wrestling, and eating spaghetti 
. . . Took advantage of the fact that his father owned 
a clothing store . . . one of the few who rarely missed 
a Kimball breakfast . . . or a Saturday night movie 
. . . Liked long walks to the hills of Auburn in the 
spring . . . and snowball fights in the winter . . . 
called "Duke," though none knew why . . . Shy 
until you knew him, then a fast friend . . . carry on 
in Med school, Lew. 



Sodality 1, 2, 4; Intramural Debating 2; 
Purple Patcher 4; Tomahawk 1, 2; 
Scientific Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Camera Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 
4; Rhode Island Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at La Salle Academy 
Providence, R. I. 




Charles Wilfrid Chaqnon 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

156 Park Avenue 
Woonsocket, R. I. 



Charlie . . . our "busy little bee" . . . many knew 
him via the air waves . . . utilized an excellent 
collection of records for his nightly broadcasts . . . 
"Station WHCC coming to you from Room 56 Carlin" 
. . . Avid camera fan at proms, rallies, and football 
games . . . the Outing Club claimed him in winter 
. . . skied in New Hampshire, then broke a ski on 
the perilous slopes of Pakachoag . . . Organized the 
"Feather Merchants" in Sophomore year . . . for 
all those five feet four and under . . . Usually found 
with McBain . . . associated with Irishmen so much 



he considered adopting the name "Rory" O'Shannon 
. . . Super-salesman of stationery, records, etc. . . . 
a booming bass who chanted Russian ditties in the back 
of chem lab . . . regular at Sock's . . . liked ham- 
burgers, black coffee, and his pipe the night before a 
big exam . . . devoted an intense study each morning 
to the adventures of Li'l Abner . . . Fiery infielder in 
intramurals . . . witty . . . systematic . . . had 
everything written down ... a little man with a 
big future. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic Society 
1, 2, 3, 4; Tomahawk 1; Scientific So- 
ciety 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Committee 4; 
Aquinas Circle 4; Alpha Sigma Nu 3, 4, 
President 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
B. W. I. Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4. 

Prepared at St. George's College 
Kingston, Jamaica, B. W. I. 



Leonard I. Chang 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

9 Stephen Street 
Allman Town, Kingston, Jamaica, B. W. I. 



"Jamaica, the pearl of the Antilles, the brightest jewel 
in the king's crown" . . . Len's smile was just as 
bright . . . while his melodious voice enhanced the 
charm of the metaphors themselves . . . Came to 
Holy Cross with a background in the classics which 
the rest of us spent Freshman and Sophomore years 
acquiring . . . and proceeded to shine as a Physics 
major . . . brilliant student . . . amazingly erudite 
in Dr. Basch's Physics Seminars . . . Claimed the 
feminine world was his hobby . . . An authority, 
of course, on Jamaica rum . . . with a fine taste in 



clothes . . . and a secret ambition to return home with 
a Crosley with which to putter around the island . . . 
It was a pleasure to argue with Len, even when you had 
to admit you were wrong ... A master of classroom 
innuendo, with a sense of humor ... A facile sketcher 
... in fact, a prospective civil engineer with the soul 
of an artist . . . All of which made the presidency 
of Alpha Sigma Nu an honor well deserved . . . Len 
is perfectly suited to carry the glory of Pakachoag to 
the far corners of the earth. 



[ntramural Debating 1 ; Dramatics 1 ; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; New Haven 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4. 

Prepared at New Haven High School 
New Haven, Conn. 




William Joseph Connellan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

43 Maltby Place 
New Haven, Conn. 



The Elm City's successor to "Knobby" and "Dick" . . . 
his Chewie suffered many night rides through Stafford 
Springs ... his Luckies were martyrs of many 
nocturnal raiders in Beaven . . . through it all Bill 
never ceased to give the boys laughs . . . and to enjoy 
many himself . . . Exerted a powerful influence on 
"F. X." . . . which was returned . . . then both 
conspired against Jack Ryan and Mike . . . but al- 
ways with the purpose of "bestowing a reward" . . . 
man of original opinions . . . well-founded and will- 
ingly expressed . . . especially in Economics, where 



he was never misinformed ... A conservative con- 
noisseur of wardrobes . . . Bill's only extravagance was 
a corduroy coat . . . The B. C. weekends were his 
greatest . . . the fulfillment always equaled the 
anticipation ... in Junior he forgot to bring back 
the car . . . but that was Bill . . . when he could 
get along without excess baggage, he did . . . Tops 
on a dance floor . . . certainly a happy man . . . 
unquestionably a bright one . . . with an optimism 
tempered by good sense . . . keep 'em smilin', Willie. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 
1, 2, 3; Aquinas Circle 4; Irish Cul- 
tural Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Philhar- 
monic 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Bos- 
ton Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. John's Preparatory 

School 

Danvers, Mass. 



J. Edward Conners 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

29 Shaw Road 
Brookline, Mass. 



Some are born with silver spoons in their mouths . . . 
Jay claims he was playing a hot trumpet at birth . . . 
principal devotee of Harry James . . . loved popular 
music . . . wasn't averse to talking about it . . . 
played a mean trumpet himself for both band and 
Crusaders ... his affiliation with the former group 
was most opportune . . . joined in sophomore year 
in time to make the N. Y. U. trip . . . boasted that 
he never missed a Holy Cross dance . . . His stories 
about his troubles getting into the war were legion 



. . . finally landed with the Marines . . . expects to 
win the fracas single-handed . . . Lived off campus 
but knew practically everyone in school ... A hard 
worker outside of class hours . . . held jobs all over 
the city, including one at Case Clothes . . . took a 
terrific ribbing about "gas-pipe racks" . . . Jay . . . 
the eternal talker . . . inimitable "social" animal 
. . . but the characteristic which will be remembered 
longest is his ability to smile ... So long "leather- 
neck." 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 4; Intramural Debating 1, 2, Vice- 
President 1 ; Dramatic Society 1, 2, 3, 
4, Student Director 4; Playshop 1, 2, 3, 
4; Purple Patcher 4; Purple 2, 3, 4, 
Managing Editor 4; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3, 
4, Feature Editor 4; Aquinas Circle 4; 
History Academy 1, 2; Cross and Scroll 
1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Debating 3, 4; Lec- 
ture Debating 3, 4; Intramural Sports 
3; French Academy 1, 2; Metropolitan 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Prepared at Xavier High School 
New York, N. Y. 




Martin Francis Cnnrny, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

45-48 42nd Street 
Sunnyside, L. I., N. Y. 



Ever the artist . . . claimed he lived "in a world all 
his own" . . . always the humorist . . . "rough ex- 
terior but a heart of gold" . . . wielder of a mighty 
pen and a not so mighty Softball bat . . . wrote prize- 
winning short stories about children . . . and his 
Newark boyhood . . . Played "Louis the Blood" in 
his first place one-acter . . . Eloquence carried him 
to the B. J. F. presidency . . . ruled "with an iron 
hand" ... A thin dime away from the Purple 
editorship . . . Feuded with Larson over editorial 
prerogatives and with Kelley's sister over his poetry 



. . . wound up in the latter engagement with an 
onion bulb (he called it tulip) . . . Convinced us 
he had "no left kidney" . . . and that his name meant 
"viceroy" . . . Would reset an alarm five times . . . 
then sleep till noon . . . Wore his favorite plaid shirt 
for long stretches of time . . . said he had a dozen 
exactly the same . . . Talked of "Alma, Palma, and 
Irma" . . . Our lovable Black Sheep . . . always 
just a step ahead of Father Reed and the Purple dead- 
line . . . Carved a reputation on the Hill . . . and 
a niche in our hearts. 




Intramural Sports 3, 4; Philharmonic 3. 

Prepared at St. Mary's High School 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



William J. Conway 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



The bespectacled gentleman from Colorado . . . joined 
us in Junior . . . immediately lent himself to "this 
New England atmosphere" ; would never admit it was 
even slightly comparable to that of the west . . . 
liked the East much more after his first trip to New 
York . . . and returned from Boston to say the town 
was underrated . . . Sociology was his major . . . 
philosophy his "easy subject" . . . Inveterate reader 
. . . would miss a meal for a story . . . Maintains 
his greatest accomplishment was the pledging of twenty- 



five prospective freshmen to the Jim Dennehy Epicurean 
Society and the F. Coleman Nature Guild ... a very 
tactful person . . . often his sobriety carried a humor- 
ous or witty touch . . . "I really like it" . . . Played 
tennis and baseball . . . waited on table . . . took 
a peek at "the Village" on weekends off . . . Bill 
was a man who enjoyed himself with no effort . . . 
Listened intently . . . spoke little . . . gleaned 
much ... a remarkable Westerner who should have 
come East sooner. 



Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Labor 
Academy 1, 2, 3; Hartford Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Connecticut Club 1, 2, 3, 4; German 
Club 3. 

Prepared at St. Thomas Seminary 
Bloomfield, Conn. 




Edward Arthur Courier. Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

239 Blue Hills Avenue 
Hartford, Conn. 



Ed hails from the famed insurance city . . . ever 
proud of his home town . . . defended it against all 
comers . . . Steady, quiet, easy-going ... a consistent 
and ambitious student . . . adept mathematician . . . 
doubled up on Cost Accounting and Auditing in Senior 
year . . . quite a feat for any man . . . staunch de- 
fender of the B.S. Business Administration course over 
the A.B. curriculum . . . Knew how to have a good 
time . . . lively competitor on the intramural field 
. . . ardent sports fan . . . seen often with Hartford 



roomie Bill McKone . . . Heckled the "Spider" about 
"Statia" . . . Everyone was anxious to meet Ed's 
sister . . . Quick-witted . . . appreciative of a good 
joke . . . generally ready with one himself . . . 
Entered enthusiastically into the thick of Kimball table 
talks . . . had something worthwhile to add . . . 
with carefully chosen words . . . Has a winning 
smile . . . keen, intelligent eyes . . . clean-cut 
features ... a cheerful personality which we'll all 
miss ... A sure success in his future endeavors. 




Sodality 2, 3, 4; Scientific Society 3, 4; 
Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 2; 
Philharmonic 1; Choir 3, 4; German 
Academy 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Cambridge High and Latin 

School 

Cambridge, Mass. 



James Laurence Cnyle 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

258 Common Street 
Belmont, Mass. 



Could tell Prokofieff from Schostakovitch at forty paces 
. . . sang first bass in the choir and wiggled his 
ears at Fr. Keating . . . then transferred to the Glee 
Club and wiggled them at Mr. Bouvier . . . Married 
a pipe in freshman year and has lived in conjugal bliss 
ever since . . . had a beautiful cap of Russian fur 
which made him look like Michael Strogoff . . . Beeg 
Jeem . . . deep gruff voice . . . cafeteria fixture . . . 
sedentary ... Is credited with perfect definition of 
a doughnut-hole: the surrounded absence of a part 
of the substance of a thing . . . When someone stole 



an album of records from Jim, he remarked philo- 
sophically that music taste here was on the upgrade . . . 
a very romantic individual at heart, even though he 
swore all his Belmont evenings were spent "cum libro" 
. . . enjoyed sparring gutterals with Mr. Boursy . . . 
Still doesn't know who stole that debate manual from 
his room in sophomore year ... a person to spend 
a quiet evening with over cigars and beer ... or 
just beer . . . He'll probably tune the harps in 
Heaven. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom Com- 
mitteee 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Boston College High School 
Boston, Mass. 




George Albert Coyne, Jr 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

43 O'Neil Street 
Hudson, Mass. 



The man-about-town from Hudson . . . clapper and 
amicable . . . the Saturday night socialite . . . Boston 
or Worcester ... it made no difference to George 
. . . Belonged to that exclusive "caf" set which 
grouped in the corner . . . always outstanding in the 
boisterous arguments which ensued there . . . clever 
. . . witty . . . and never without a hearty grin 
or a laugh . . . his quips always added humor to 
any occasion . . . Generous with his cigarettes and 
car rides . . . Actively interested in all sports . . . 
especially hockey, football, and baseball . . . lauded 



the Yanks . . . George was never bothered by in- 
somnia . . . could sleep anywhere ... at anytime 
. . . and when it came to neatness ... a page from 
Esquire . . . Enjoyed such "hoi polloi" delectables 
as hamburgers and cokes . . . Consistent . . . knew 
how to work as well as play ... an Economics major 
. . . One of the five who composed the Spring Formal 
Committee ... an important factor in the success 
of our big social event . . . Whether it was work or 
play, a man who was distinctly collegiate . . . we'll 
miss you, George. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Classical High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Richard Joseph Creedon 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

50 Brantwood Road 
Worcester, Mass. 



Presenting a man of wide and varying interests . . . 
one of the most critical and well-informed sports fans 
on the Hill . . . rarely misses a Cross team in action, 
whether at home or away, in football or in baseball 
. . . out-of-town games were his favorites . . . Dick 
spent hours worrying about exams . . . always man- 
aged to attain good grades . . . Chief pastime: dis- 
cussing the war situation . . . knew the facts of the 
conflict from all angles . . . approached them phil- 
osophically or sociologically with equal ease . . . 



Crowning ambition: to be successful in the realm of 
Social Science . . . Then life had its lighter side 
. . . Monday afternoons were never a problem for 
Dick . . . they were invariably spent at the Plymouth 
. . . enjoyed himself at social functions . . . had 
such a Delightful companion . . . Known far and 
wide for his camping experiences at "Happy Hampton" 
during the summer months . . . we'll always remem- 
ber Dick as a gentleman . . . with a distinct pre- 
delection for the better things of life. 



Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2, 3, 4; Berkshire Club 1, 2. 

Prepared at St. Joseph's High 

North Adams, Mass. 




Thomas Joseph Cumminqs 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

19 Alton Street 
Arlington, Mass. 



"Scoop" spent a fruitful four years on the Hill ab- 
sorbing Shakespeare, Chaucer, the Classics, and all 
phases of the modern literary world . . . managed to 
make frequent appearances on the Dean's List . . . 
is the envied one of the Fraternity with his regular 
visits to the Hub and to Regis . . . has a singular 
interest in the latter . . . Though usually quiet, Tom 
has his enthusiastic and even explosive moments, which 
come about two P. M., as Father Busam will gladly 
testify . . . Regular intramuralite, but "Scoop" would 
rather write about baseball than play it . . . regularly 



contributed "Cross" news to The Globe . . . The guid- 
ing light in many a session . . . has a likeable sincerity 
and a ready smile . . . outstanding example of the 
virtue of neatness . . . Though definitely the blond 
Adonis, Tom showed evidence of tropical tendencies 
with his regular siestas . . . always seen with "Bud" 
Merritt, his Jimmy Dolan in the Press Box at any 
Purple Contest . . . likes dancing, tennis, golf, and 
sirloin steaks . . . "Scoop" will give a purple tint to 
the Fourth Estate. 




Sodality 1 ; Aquinas Circle 4 ; Cross 
and Scroll 1, 2 ; Tennis 3 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 4; 
Junior Prom Committee 3 ; Glee Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Choir 1, 2; French Academy 
1, 2, 3, 4; Labor Academy 4; Metro- 
politan Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Regis High School 
New York, N. Y. 



Ryan Andrew Cuneo 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

530 East 86th Street 
New York, N. Y. 



Gotham sent us this wise old owl from Regis . . . 
was known as a Big Time Operator . . . could cor- 
respond with five lovelies at once and never make a 
slip . . . Never stopped talking of Hornell, New 
York, and its great attractions . . . then too there 
was New Rochelle . . . Ryan found that New Eng- 
land had points of interest . . . Wellesley, Smith, 
Regis . . . Many a contact was made on Glee Club 
trips . . . Instrumental in putting over the long- 
awaited Spring Formal . . . ardent supporter of all 
the Met Club dances . . . Was very active in all 



fields of intramural endeavor . . . Usually entertained 
a classmate in New York over a holiday . . . "Ry" 
was always a grouper, but suffered a severe setback 
when both Reagan and Beecher left school . . . 
"Blackie" . . . was saluted to the tune of "Deep In 
the Heart of the Congo" . . . Was constantly out of 
cigarettes . . . liked smart clothes and loud bow ties 
untied . . . Always wore a smile . . . always ready 
for a good time . . . Ryan ... a good student and 
a good friend. 



Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission 
Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Labor Academy 1. 

Prepared at Central High School 
Bridgeport, Conn. 




Raymond George Curry 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

1630 Park Avenue 
Bridgeport, Conn. 



Micawber-like in his optimism . . . always looking at 
the bright side of things through rose-colored glasses 
. . . violent contraversialist on anything and every- 
thing . . . Staunch defender of all Connecticut men 
. . . and the honor of the New York Yankees . . . 
argued unendingly with all the small men of the 
class over relative strength . . . Gargantuan appetite 
. . . Ray's capacity for food was limited only by the 
interval between bells . . . second love was sleep . . . 
nothing but exams broke the log-sawing routine . . . 
a gazelle on the basketball court . . . weirdest shooter 



in the intramural league . . . rarest shot came against 
Carlin III . . . Known as "Wild Bull" Curry for 
a night . . . Most faithful man in the class to his 
one and only . . . swore vengeance on all concerned 
for the fake telegram before the N. Y. U. game which 
almost ruined his weekend . . . Father Brennan dis- 
approved the treatment of his sound-sleeping room- 
mate when his bed was half-way out the window . . . 
Sports dispenser at the gym ... a great guy . . . 
Ray, our "Connecticut Yankee." 




Intramural Debating 1, 2, Chairman 2 ; 
Purple Patcher 4, Feature Editor; 
Tomahawk 1, 4; Yacht Club 3, 4; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary 
Society 4; Western Club 1, 2; Chicago 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Purple Patcher 
Dance Committee 4. 

Prepared at Loyola Academy 
Chicago, 111. 



Joseph Thomas Daly, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

2735 North Washtenaw Avenue 
Chicago, 111. 



Joe of the curly hair and carrying voice . . . Chair- 
man of Sophomore debating . . . sincere lover of 
sports . . . Monday morning quarterback . . . knew 
all the football greats in the Mid-West . . . Knew 
more about war planes than any man on the Hill . . . 
would talk about them night and day . . . Joe's am- 
bition is the naval dirigible service . . . Could smell 
out a "session" with infallible instinct . . . favorite 
dish ... ice cream . . . what a coincidence that 
his best pal's father owned an ice cream company . . . 
often seen heading for Pine Manor with Lore or 



McCann . . . made a trip to Washington via Mary- 
mount, New Rochelle, and Trinity . . . Manages to 
make a weekend in New York once a month ... a 
human road map . . . knew his way around every road 
from New Hampshire to Virginia . . . from the east 
coast to Chicago . . . helpful friend of many a home- 
sick freshman from the Mid-West . . . Connoisseur 
of good food, the fair sex, 'sharp' clothing, and boogie 
woogie . . . Here's to you, Joe . . . may your ship 
always come in. 



Sodality 1, 2 ; Intramural Debating 1, 
2; Purple 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Officer 1; 
Football Manager 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 
1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctu- 
ary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 
1; Labor Academy 1, 2; Essex Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Spanish Club 2, 3. 

Prepared at Red Bank Catholic High 
Red Bank, N. J. 




Edward F. Danowitz 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

63 Poplar Avenue 
Red Bank, N. J. 



"Big Ed" . . . photographer's contact man . . . foot- 
ball manager . . . "Dawn Patroller" . . . debater . . . 
poet ... Ed did many things . . . and did them 
all well . . . came from Red Bank . . . "God's 
country" . . . showed us how things are done in 
Noo Joisey . . . for four years, Ed administered faith- 
fully to the football players . . . travelled to Louisiana 
with them . . . still speaks of the delights of the trip 
and still has something tangible to prove them . . . 
loves the sea . . . his poems on it. printed in The 
Purple, won him an award . . . athletic . . . stars 



on the intramural field ... a smashing fullback in 
the annual Purple-Tomabaivk battles . . . nor did he 
forget the spiritual aspects of the Cross . . . member 
of the Sodality' and the Sanctuary Society . . . elected 
the secretary of our freshman class . . . and he 
proved he deserved the nomination ... an executive 
of the Essex Club . . . Serious, as you can see . . . 
withal, kept to the books ... his marks confirmed 
his all-around ability . . . there's no stopping Ed 
... he knows what he wants . . . and he means to 
have it. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debat- 
ing 2; Dramatic Society 3, 4; Purple 
Patcher 4; Aquinas Circle 4; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 3, 
4; Labor Academy 2, 3, 4; Boston Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Maiden Catholic High School 
Maiden, Mass. 



James Vincent Devine 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

23 Fellsmere Road 
Maiden, Mass. 



"Father" . . . Jim's room was once praised in a 
philosophy class . . . the same adjectives could de- 
scribe Jim . . . orderly, spotless . . . neat . . . im- 
peccable . . . unlike his room, is thin, wiry . . . 
alert . . . intelligent . . . serious . . . conversation- 
alist ... a realist with ideals . . . faithful Sodalist 
. . . member of the Labor Academy for two years 
. . . hard worker ... in every field . . . shifted 
scenery and props for the Dramatic Society ... al- 
most went crazy trying to keep pace with Fr. Gallagher 
. . . liked to tinker with things mechanical . . . 



but had a lighter and more social side . . . would 
spend quiet week-ends on the campus . . . planning 
for more important events . . . knew well the Regis 
and Lasell dances . . . and the H. C. social affairs 
. . . as a matter of fact, liked and indulged in every- 
thing worth while . . . plenty of school spirit . . . 
hoarse for days after a football game . . . had one 
long day-dream: to own an ocean going sailboat . . . 
will describe the plans in full detail ... it will be 
well-planned . . . just like his life. 



Sodality 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 
1, 2; Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural 
Sports 1,2,3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3, 
4; Philharmonic 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 
3, 4; French Academy 2; Berkshire 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Lee High School 
Lee, Mass. 




William Henry Diamond 



ACHELOR OF ARTS 

100 Franklin Street 
Lee, Mass. 



The well-dressed gentleman from Lee . . . looks on 
all things with a cosmopolitan view ... is seldom 
disturbed . . . will always be remembered by Lawless, 
Johnson et al for a certain trip to Washington in 
freshman year . . . Bill was given to debate at any 
time or place ... as when he argued with Johnson 
in the back seat while driving down a Maryland 
mountainside at 70 m.p.h. . . . marched on Fitton 
Field with the band every Saturday . . . Clad in even- 
ing clothes, Bill's debonair figure cut a wide swath 
among the fair sex on the Glee Club trips . . . knew 



his way around New York night life . . . Fond of 
movies in Kimball . . . and of brilliant multi-hued 
hat bands . . . Avid chess player . . . deep student 
of military strategy . . . lover of good music . . . 
Once had a long argument with Father Gillis on the 
relative merits of Scotch and beer . . . Took class 
seriously, had consistently good marks . . . Reputed 
to have a particular interest in Waterbury . . . Bill 
knows what he wants from life and has definite ideas 
on how to get it. 




Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Golf 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Classical High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Richard Edward Dolan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

17 Rittenhouse Road 
Worcester, Mass. 



Dapper Dick . . . impeccably clothed at all times . . . 
especially before a date . . . popular, but quiet . . . 
director of many a successful Worcester Club dance 
. . . Favorite saying: "Well, fellows, I have to go 
home and study" . . . we never quite believed him 
. . . Constant companion of loquacious Charlie Glavin 
. . . one of the leaders of the Worcester Club . . . 
competent debater, no matter what the subject . . . 
liked sports of all kinds . . . good tennis player . . . 
beautiful pass receiver . . . dead-eye in basketball 
games . . . Had a phenomenal memory for names 
. . . genial and pleasant at all times, with a hearty 



laugh . . . Was slightly skeptical . . . liked a quiet 
game of cards . . . was never very lucky . . . hand- 
some . . . modest . . . easily amused ... a con- 
stant source of local information . . . believed Wor- 
cester was the greatest town in the world, that it had 
everything . . . Always got to the out-of-town football 
games . . . especially that one at Syracuse . . . spent 
his summers in Rhode Island . . . conscientious about 
studies . . . Liked to read . . . never found it hard 
to concentrate . . . member in good standing of caf 
society . . . our Dick. 



Sodality 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Labor Academy 3, 4, Publicity Director 
3; Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Prepared at Cambridge High and Latin 

School 
Cambridge, Mass. 




George T. Donley, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

32 Market Street 
Cambridge, Mass. 



Our connoisseur of tobaccos and collector of pipes 
. . . left them in the strangest places ... As the 
Cambridge residents of the "golden days," "Cosey" was 
well-acquainted with contemporary literature . . . liked 
modern humorists especially . . . kept a volume 
of the other "Mr. Dooley" . . . but didn't restrict 
his observations to the Philippine question . . . Spent 
much time at the theater . . . preferred "Claudia," 
which he saw more than once . . . Not the noisiest or 
most conspicuous at a party . . . but always enjoyed 
himself . . . spent his summers with Kelley in Maine 
. . . found it "so peaceful in the country" . . . 



"Cosey" loved American cheese on pumpernickel, with 
hot mustard . . . recommended the mustard to friends 
. . . then offered to eat their sandwiches when they 
found the taste too strong . . . Supplemented his ed- 
ucation at Massachusetts School of Art, where he model- 
ed clay potatoes . . . and at Regis, where he invaded 
the dining hall . . . with negligible success . . . 
Handball enthusiast . . . campaigner for "Miller's" 
. . . soundest sleeper in three states ... a man with 
many friends . . . Life sets a fast pace, but George 
will take it in stride. 




B. J. F. 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Tomahawk 1; History Academy 3; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Albany Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Catholic Central High 
Troy, N. Y. 



Paul J. II n i ;i n 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

700 8th Avenue 
Watervliet, N. Y. 



"P. J." . . . the little man with tremendous ideas . . . 
impressive voice . . . ear glued to the radio . . . 
careful conning of newspapers . . . could out-Eliot 
the famed Major . . . with a considerably more pleasant 
delivery . . . his wise-cracks had enough truth in 
them to make them truly humorous . . . We often 
gathered in his room after lights ... At his smoothest 
on the dance floor . . . had an admiring circle at 
the B. C. Victory dance in Junior . . . always had 
an apt, if not correct, answer in Creative Writing class 



. . . where his papers were outstanding . . . can 
laugh at himself . . . which proves how talented he 
is . . . his laugh is sudden and explosive . . . like 
measles, it comes when it is least expected, and is 
contagious . . . Paul gets good marks without ex- 
cessive effort . . . once he has decided upon a plan 
. . . whether of action or passivity ... he cannot 
be deterred . . . His purpose in life: to be success- 
ful .. . lots of us will be surprised if he isn't. 



B. J. F. 3; Tomahau'k 2, 3; Aquinas 
Circle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Philharmonic 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2, 3, 4; Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
German Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Crusaders 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Public Latin School 
Boston, Mass. 







Philip John Dawning 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

1106 River Street 
Hyde Park, Mass. 



The white Count Basie . . . expertly tickled the 
ivories . . . and our funny-bones . . . Never wasted 
his words or his energy . . . molasses flowing uphill 
once beat him in a race . . . was once seen running 
... to avoid a downpour ... A blond Ned Sparks 
. . . whose poker face helped him in Beaven's bitter 
bridge battles . . . the only time he was a chatterbox 
was when he was asleep . . . when large crowds 
would gather to listen and marvel . . . Travelled ex- 
tensively with the Philharmonic . . . Broadway re- 



members him from the N. Y. U. week-end ... a 
member of the band that never did get to play . . . 
one of John E.'s friendly feudists . . . packed many 
a suitcase in sophomore year . . . was the "Professor" 
of the junior physics lab . . . though Phil learned 
about the stick without an end only in the Junior 
orals . . . flashed (except in his own pan) on the 
tennis courts . . . wherever he's going in life, he'll 
arrive at the last moment . . . but he'll arrive. 




Sodality 1, 2; B. J. F. 3; Intramural 
Debating 2 ; Aquinas Circle 4 ; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 
1, 2; Connecticut Club 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Danbury High School 
Danbury, Conn. 



James C. Driscoll, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Georgetown, Conn. 



Your first impression of Jim is that of a tall, wiry, 
prairie-burnt Texan ... his Connecticut accent 
proves your error . . . enthusiastic intramuralite, Jim 
has been the efficient cause of many a black and blue 
spot on the football field . . . ardent Purple supporter 
. . . typical Cross man ... a handsome guy . . . 
frequent visitor to the Carroll Club . . . goes in, how- 
ever, for every outdoor sport there is . . . favorites 
are hunting and fishing . . . ready smile and sin- 
cerity have won Jim many friends on the Hill and 



elsewhere . . . always the first one dressed to go 
someplace . . . and is usually in the process of either 
going or coming ... on the quiet side but none the 
less a man of action . . . witness the Manhattan game 
of '41 when he was the prominent defender of the 
goal posts ... a consistent and steady plugger in 
his studies, Jim will go far in whatever field he chooses 
... a hard player who plays for keeps, we're keeping 
our eyes on Jim. 



B. J. F. 3, 4; Intramural Debating 1, 
2; Purple Patcher 4; Aquinas Circle 
4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior 
Prom Committee, Chairman 3 ; Purple 
Key 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Philharmonic 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 
4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Maine 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Crusaders 1, 2, 3, 
Leader 4; Musical Club, Assistant In- 
strumental Manager 2. 

Prepared at Waterville Senior High 

School 

w/aterville, Me. 




Richard Joseph Dubard 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

80 Silver Street 
Waterville, Me. 



"Dick" . . . "Dewey" . . . "Dublatz" . . . the fair- 
haired boy of many talents . . . Clever, humorous, 
good-natured, and bubbling over with friendliness . . . 
one-man Chamber of Commerce . . . gifted with the 
ability of accomplishing many things within a short 
time ... a sincere student ... a familiar campus 
figure . . . and one of the most popular . . . 
Energetic participator in many campus activities . . . 
Purple Key . . . Philharmonic . . . Crusaders . . . 
Outing Club . . . virtuoso of the clarinet and sax 
. . . Chairman of our Junior Prom . . . made it the 
big night of our four years . . . hard worker . . . 



serious and conscientious about his duties . . . con- 
sistent Dean's List man . . . learned quickly, com- 
pletely, and thoroughly ... a future lawyer . . . 
Avid intramuralite . . . still found time for his many 
social activities . . . "mixer" . . . week-ender . . . 
Temporarily lost his sun-kissed wavy hair as the result 
of an accident in Junior year . . . One of the good- 
natured funmakers of Beaven I . . . imitator and 
comedian . . . kept friends amused for hours . . . 
prosecuting attorney in Beaven mock trial ... At 
ease anywhere . . . gentlemen, humorist, and student 
... a Crusader in every way. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debat- 
ing 1, 2; Aquinas Circle 4; Cross and 
Scroll 1, 2; Intramural Sports 3, 4; Mis- 
sion Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Worcester 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. John's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Kevin M. Earls 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

10 Duxbury Road 
Worcester, Mass. 



There was never anything that he wouldn't or couldn't 
do for his friends . . . Kev maintained his record of 
unfailing good humor and kindness for four straight 
years . . . under his smooth brown hair and twink- 
ling eyes was a limitless source of generosity and en- 
couragement . . . His Chevrolet threatened to run 
Consolidated out of business . . . was never in too 
much of a hurry to give somebody a ride ... in 
turn he was "ridden" about Fran or his job as a Fuller 



brushman . . . but he took it in good spirit . . . 
hard-working student . . . still, found time to put 
his tennis ability to financial advantage and have some 
busy week-ends on Beaver Street . . . worked in a 
shoe store and on Hampton Beach in the summer, en- 
joying both jobs ... a future Ensign in V-7 . . . 
but as long as hard work and ability pay off, we can 
be sure that he will be found among the leaders. 



Intramural Debating 1 ; Purple Patch- 
er 4; History Academy 4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 
2, 4; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2, 3, 4; Metropolitan Club 1, 
2, 4. 

Prepared at Roosevelt High School 
Yonkers, N. Y. 




Cla 



rence E . Em ery, J r 



ACHELOR OF ARTS 

27 Desmond Avenue 
Bronxville, N. Y. 



Bronxville's contribution to the Glee Club where for 
four years he and Dick Johnson waged a debate over 
who was the better tenor . . . Larry restricted his 
practice to long sessions of hog-calling in the shower 
room . . . An analytical mind that grasped quickly 
and completely . . . studies came first . . . when 
work was finished the sky was the limit . . . never 
left anything half done . . . quick-tempered but quick 
to cool off . . . never held a grudge . . . Had a 
caustic and penetrating wit . . . seldom the loser of 
a verbal bout . . . enjoyed a good argument . . . 



Protagonist in the Alumni II water feud whose winner 
is still disputed . . . one of the class' best bridge play- 
ers .. . adroit master of the finesse . . . claimed it 
was intuition . . . Raconteur of many week-end 
anecdotes . . . has a particular fondness for Ports- 
mouth and is a patron of the South Shore . . . claimed 
he acquires a summer tan but no one believed him . . . 
Also goes "a-feudin" on the tennis court, once rolling 
up a credit of thirty frappes ... an accomplished 
student, gentleman and friend. 




Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; Pur- 
ple Key 3, 4; Labor Academy 3, 4; 
Metropolitan Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at White Plains High School 
White Plains, N. Y. 



James Hayes Fairclough, III 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

20 Holly Road 
Waban, Mass. 



"Blades" . . . the winter sports expert . . . recipient 
of many quips . . . Turner swore Jim inspired the 
movie Love On Ice . . . we leave it to you . . . The 
rare fellow who is a natural on any athletic field . . . 
charter-member of the off-to-Boston set . . . one of 
the occupants of notorious 'Too flat" . . . professed a 
preference for blondes . . . such as Madeleine Carroll 
. . . even went so far as to put it on the record . . . 
Sound-effects man and character-player for station MON 
. . . Purple Keyite . . . generous with anything he 



had . . . could not decide between the merits of 
Westchester and Wellesley . . . so he compromised 
by frequently visiting the latter and by extolling the 
virtues of the former's students, along with Burkie 
and Hank . . . An extraordinary artist, as his note- 
book will testify . . . Joined the Marines in junior 
year, with a commission in sight on graduation . . . 
he has only to display those qualities he has shown us 
for four years and the service will be assured of an 
excellent officer. 



Sodality 2 ; Intramural Debating 2 ; Sci- 
entific Society 1, 2 ; Maine Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; German Academy 1, 2, 3. 

Prepared at Cony High School 
Augusta, Me. 




Richard IVetterville Fallon 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

43 Green Street 
Augusta, Me. 



Dick ... to whom Maine was heaven on earth 
. . . anyone who knew him learned the history and 
geography of the State from his constant chatter . . . 
Son of a prominent physician, he followed steadfastly 
the path ahead . . . chief relaxation was playing bridge 
with other pre-meds . . . was the most serious casualty 
in Kimball during our four years ... it took two 
hours for the doctor to sew up his gashed hand and 
wrist . . . Now will agree with us that it is better 
to wait until the doors of Kimball are open before 



trying to go in or ouc . . . Never one to worry . . . 
except about Martha . . . her week-ends home always 
coincided with his . . . Intensely argumentative . . . 
His brother Lou was a senior when we were freshmen 
. . . both displayed a streak of independence ... a 
flare for tempting the powers-that-be occasionally got 
them into at least lukewarm water . . . loyal friend 
. . . frank at all costs . . . but any sting was quickly 
tempered by an unusual generosity. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debat- 
ing 2 ; Irish Cultural Academy 1, 2 ; 
Yacht Club 1 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Out- 
ing Club 1, 2; Philharmonic 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Hartford 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Prepared at Georgetown Preparatory 
School 



Garrett Park, Md. 



Thomas Lawrence Ferry, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

61 Parker Avenue, North 
Meriden, Conn. 



Greeted his friends with a cheerful grin and a hearty 
slap on the back . . . Tom hoped to become a mortician 
... so deep was the desire that it came out even in 
his dancing . . . originated the "Morticians' Waltz" 
. . . Played for four years in the orchestra . . . it is 
rumored that his many excursions to Regis were made 
in an attempt to join their orchestra ... it would 
have been so handy ... A standout on Wheeler I's 
intramural football team . . . Tom's only worry was 
his fast-receding brow . . . the price of intellectual 



advancement ... A member of both the Sodality 
and Sanctuary Society . . . chose to serve his country 
as a V-7 cadet . . . should make a fine officer ... A 
believer in self -discipline . . . kept in good shape with 
daily exercise in the gym . . . conscientious with re- 
gard to his obligations . . . studious and systematic 
in his daily work . . . But most outstanding of his 
attributes were his joviality and loyalty ... he could 
always manage to smile . . . and never failed a friend 
in need. 



Sodality 2; B. J. F. 3; Intramural De- 
bating 2 ; History Academy 1 ; Class 
Vice-President 3 ; Football 2 ; Labor 
Academy 1; Milford Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Prepared at Kents Hill Preparatory 

School 
Kents Hill, Me. 




John Charles Fior 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

68 Clark Street 
Framingham, Mass. 



Called Big Sam . . . very snappy dresser . . . fancy 
suitcoats . . . good-natured . . . always smiling . . . 
sleepy type . . . can fall asleep anywhere . . . good 
mixer . . . very popular . . . vice-President of our 
class for a year . . . hard worker . . . pleasing per- 
sonality . . . spends a lot of time in the library . . . 
Son of Fury . . . hates to be awakened when sleeping in 
the lounge . . . partial to Framingham State Teachers' 
girls . . . worked in library . . . stumped by math 
course . . . played football . . . works at Abner 



Wheeler House . . . owns an Americar . . . con- 
stant defender of Italian contributions to modern civil- 
ization . . . has never lost an argument with Jerry 
McQuillan . . . star high-school athlete . . . devotes 
his time to his books here on the Hill . . . defender 
of Jesuit philosophy . . . favorite hideouts were Hamp- 
ton Beach and Fieldston . . . During his term of office 
got to know most of the boarders . . . had a pleasant 
word for each . . . Loved "big business" . . . maybe 
a future executive. 




Scientific Society 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; 
North Shore Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Lynn Classical High School 
Lynn, Mass. 



Carl Arthur Fischer 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

463 Broadway 
Lynn, Mass. 



Puckish . . . proud possessor of a deep blue suit which 
he insists the man said was green . . . considered it 
one of the seven capital sins to be on time for class 
. . . has a distinct aversion to neckties . . . Had the 
happy faculty of foretelling quiz cancellations, always 
showing up unprepared . . . drove a milk truck one 
summer . . . will tell you all about the dairy business 
if you let him . . . prided himself on his slim waist- 
line until he was measured for a gym suit . . . woke 
up once in freshman year with a fried chicken in his 



hand . . . devised a miracle code for Greek exams — ■ 
two dots meant passive . . . When going on a week- 
end, starts to shower at twelve and gets going about 
four . . . became enamoured of a beautiful girl, let 
her take his car ; she stripped all the gears . . . called 
Dr. Watson by one of the biology profs . . . even 
Carl doesn't know what it means ... is known to 
his intimates as "the late Mr. Fischer" . . . wants to be 
a man in white . . . you'll get there, Carl. 



Tomahawk 1, 2 ; History Academy 1 ; 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; French Academy 1. 

Prepared at Bridgton Academy 
North Bridgton, Me. 




Kenneth D. Fisher 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

631 Nantasket Avenue 
Hull, Mass. 



Ken came to H. C. via Bridgeton Academy with an 
athletic record . . . has lived up to it here on the 
Hill as high jumper on the varsity track team and 
.participant in intramural athletics . . . has a talent for 
fraternizing . . . definitely a grouper . . . invariably 
seen in the "caf" with "Jay" . . . liked the friendly 
atmosphere of Sock's where Pepsi-Cola and toasted 
cheese were intermingled with modern history in viva- 
voce discussion . . . His cozy lodging was the envy of 



many ... his athletic carriage and healthy color 
marked him as the athlete he was . . . Covered plenty 
of mileage in downtown Worcester . . . Ken's ren- 
dezvous with his friend Ouelette did not neglect the 
social side of college life . . . naturally easy-going, 
if his scholastic standing became threatened always got 
down to serious work with full realization of the danger 
. . . may he clear the cross-bars of life as he did those 
of the track. 




History Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; New Haven Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Connecticut Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Ansonia High School 
Ansonia, Conn. 



William T. Fitzgerald 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

23 Jewett Street 
Ansonia, Conn. 



"Fitzie" of the quiet demeanor and the Irish monotone 
. . . bespoke simplicity and conserved energy in every- 
thing he did . . . Managed to "get the stuff up" be- 
fore ten nightly so he could go down and have a bite 
to eat . . . patron of long standing of Sock's em- 
porium . . . ambled down and strolled back . . . 
usually accompanied by his fiery roommate Buster and 
the Metropolites Rocco and Art . . . Always reticent, 
rarely in a hurry, Fitz was a perfect illustration of the 
retiring genus and the alert species ... if you ob- 



served closely you'd see that his tacit evaluation of 
things was not without depth, and that he was ex- 
perienced in many fields . . . Sports especially was 
a subject on which Fitz deliberated thoroughly and 
spoke occasionally . . . Nor was this Ansonian lax in 
his duties toward those he termed "The Fathers" — he 
bore them a lot of scholastic surprises . . . the man 
of taciturnity ... of infrequent but meaningful pithy 
sayings . . . ballast of many a careening boat . . . 
and a friend to be remembered. 



Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 2 ; 
Tomahawk 1, 2; Yacht Club 1; Base- 
ball Manager 2, 3; Golf 4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Greater Boston Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Cheer Leader 4. 

Prepared at Boston Latin School 
Boston, Mass. 




Donald Robert Foley 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

40 Prince Street 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



Last of the Foleys . . . carried on the traditions of 
his brothers . . . established his own with the orig- 
inality that was characteristic of Don . . . Helped 
manage H. C.'s diamond activities in his earlier years 
on the Hill . . . retired to devote time to the teachings 
of Aquinas . . . became very proficient there, too . . . 
One of Larry Murphy's staunch supporters . . . fre- 
quented the Pakachoag fairways often himself with 
consistent accuracy and success . . . ask Greg Wigfall 
. . . Inhabited the "luxury suite" on third Beaven . . . 
converted B. C.'s Bill Naylor to Holy Cross ways 



. . . and did a fine job, too . . . entertained the 
entire building with his humor and wit . . . made 
famous the "Skeeter Song" . . . always obliged with 
a reasonable facsimile of any top radio comic . . . 
connoisseur of the air waves . . . Always found time 
for a comfortable week-end at home with the folks 
. . . and never failed to praise and remind us of 
the good work of brother "J. Edgar" ... A most 
likeable fellow ... an Irishman to the core . . . 
he'll keep hitting them down the middle. 




Sodality 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Debating 2 ; Aquinas Circle 4 ; 
Irish Cultural Academy 4; Intramural 
Sports 4; French Academy 4; Labor 
Academy 4; Holyoke Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Sacred Heart High 
Holyoke, Mass. 



Francis M. Foley 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

23 West Glen Street 
Holyoke, Mass. 



One of Holy Cross' most genial gentlemen . . . with 
hand extended and pleasant Irish smile ... a reser- 
voir of capabilities in many lines . . . Whenever 
Frank sat down under a Mazda, he never got up until 
he had gleaned something worthwhile . . . whether 
it was an Horatian ode or the Summa . . . capable 
upholder of a classical education . . . B. J. F. man 
of no mean ability . . . Drank deep from the beauties 
of the past, yet thoroughly conversant with the affairs 
of the present . . . loyal, competent, endowed with that 
indefinable "something plus" . . . Sartorially splendid 



. . . famed for his array of Arrow cravats and Rogers 
Peet cuts . . . poetically gifted . . . we'll always re- 
member his turn of Martial into the vernacular . . . 
Humorous . . . joined with Lovering in purveying 
mirth a la Benchley ... A storehouse of knowledge 
enabled him to parry with the experts, with ease 
and finesse . . . ingratiating personality . . . pillar 
of optimism . . . Odysseus of good will . . . scion 
of Catholic culture ... we herald Frank as '43's 
Christocrat extraordinary. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 
1, 2; Aquinas Circle 4; History Acad- 
emy 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; Mission 
Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Worcester Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at Northbridge High School 
Whitinsville, Mass. 




John Kevin Foley 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

99 Linwood Avenue 
Whitinsville, Mass. 



Nothing could really upset Jake . . . although that 
second-year Greek course severely tested his optimistic 
view of life . . . active intramuralite . . . better than 
average socialite . . . once or twice he slipped from a 
place on the Dean's List . . . those lapses didn't change 
him . . . still kept his old friends and cheery smile 
. . . Solved the problem of which Foley was being 
addressed in class by letting Don answer the hard 
questions . . . summers found him quick to leave the 
books and head for the Rhode Island beaches . . . 



winter found him heading just as quickly for Auburn- 
dale and with the same reason . . . Tried living on 
tht Hill during his last year only to find that it took 
less time to get from Whitinsville to Kimball than it 
did from Wheeler . . . Proved his business ability 
by selling paper to Sophomore B . . . decided upon 
a business career after graduation and service in the 
Army . . . John's ability and ready wit will always 
keep him ahead. 




Sodality 4 ; Intramural Debating 2 ; 
Dramatic Society 4; Purple Patcher 
4; Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; New Haven 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Hillhouse High School 
New Haven, Conn. 



Joseph Edward Foley 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

588 Ferry Street 
New Haven, Conn. 



"Lou" was a drummer boy . . . also took his turn at 
the piano . . . plenty good . . . Spent most of fresh- 
man year impressing the boys with New Haven, debu- 
tantes and all the rest . . . Liked nothing better than 
an evening with Father Donaldson . . . seen every 
afternoon heading for Sock's with Bill Cull ... we 
called them Pepsi and Pete . . . Used to get beautiful 
letters with fancy-colored writing from "Mammy" . . . 
swears he spent the whole N. Y. U. week-end in New 
York looking after the band members . . . faithful 
reader of the New York News . . . Hopes to follow 



his father in the medical profession ... To Joe every- 
one was a "big time operator" . . . favorite expression 
was "Just out for the laughs" . . . promoted Pop 
Kiernan's athletics in sophomore . . . decided on a 
summer in stock, but Boyer wasn't drafted . . . 
Reputed to be the safest and surest driver on the 
Hill . . . always said his trips to Regis were to visit 
his sister . . . maybe they were . . . Tall, dark and 
jovial . . . Joe will always be remembered as tops 
. . . Good luck, BTO. 



Intramural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic So- 
ciety 3, Treasurer 3 ; Track 2, 3 ; Out- 
ing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 1; 
Junior Instructor, Freshman Accounting 
Lab. 



Prepared at The Canterbury School 
New Milford, Conn. 




Robert Vincent Fullan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

2 Ivy Close 
Forest Hills, L. I. 



Serious-minded gentleman from Long Island . . . 
strong of character and body . . . Continually re- 
calling days at Canterbury, where he prepared for 
college . . . Excellent skier and organizer . . . decided 
asset to the Outing Club . . . frequent visitor to the 
snow-covered slopes of New Hampshire . . . Derived 
his greatest enjoyment from reading and listening to 
classical music . . . Faultlessly dressed, his appear- 
ance was above censure . . . always industrious . . . 
many activities demanded his attention, but there was 
still time for numerous week-ends in New York, Boston, 



or Conway . . . Didn't relax during the summers, but 
took extra courses in Spanish . . . Treasurer of the 
Dramatic Society . . . Had an intense interest in the 
world of economics . . . typical executive . . . Re- 
laxed by sitting through double features at the Worces- 
ter movies . . . Has already obtained his commission 
in the Navy . . . Devotee of the fireplace and low 
music school . . . candlelight dinner on the terrace 
. . . Took great pleasure in being one of the boys 
. . . No one has ever seen him angry or disgruntled 
. . . scholar . . . gentleman . . . Ensign Bob. 




History 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; 
Labor Academy 3, 4; Waterbury Club 
3, 4; Chairman, Waterbury Club Christ- 
mas Dance 3. 

Prepared at Crosby High School 
Waterbury, Conn. 



Louis James Gallulo 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

20 Alder Street 
Waterbury, Conn. 



One of the Waterbury clan at Mt. St. James . . . was 
two years late in joining the bandwagon . . . Lou 
transferred to H. C. at the beginning of junior year 
and in a very short time was one of the boys . . . 
Wherever you see Ed Murphy you usually find Lou 
or vice versa . . . sharpshooter on the basketball 
court despite his size . . . Above average student . . . 
was christened by Professor Powers the best reader in 
the school due to his clear and distinct enunciation 



when asked to read passages from the text in class . . . 
Proud possessor of a '29 Ford which he actually washed 
and polished . . . Has an unusually large list of 
Worcester feminine acquaintances . . . considering 
the length of time he's been here . . . One of Lou's 
best-selling points is his happy smile . . . always wears 
it . . . has won him many friends . . . His plans, 
for the immediate future are a little uncertain . . . 
in the meantime he's preparing for a business career. 





Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3; Intra- 
mural Debating 1, 2; Irish Cultural 
Academy 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3, 4; Mission Crusade 4; Worcester 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at North High School 
Worcester, Mass. 






V 




James Laurence Garrity 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

3 Channing Way 
Worcester, Mass. 



A perpetual laugh is Jim's outstanding characteristic 
. . . One of the leading wits of the class . . . middle 
man in the line of the Garrity family at Holy Cross 
. . . Got away with more in class than most fellows! 
ever thought of doing . . . Quite a man in the Physics 
lab . . . worked dangerously . . . threat of someone 
being blown apart always imminent ... by senior 
year could be spotted from afar off due to his dis- 
appearing wavy locks . . . member of Section A for 
four years . . . Had the B. J. F. roaring with un- 
precedented laughter the only time he made an appear- 



ance on the rostrum . . . Made a gooey debut in the 
theater with the Greek play . . . Never seemed to 
have a worry . . . Carefree, light-hearted, likeable 
disposition . . . has shown his civic pride and in- 
dispensability to the city of Worcester in his official 
post as Air Raid Warden . . . live wire in the day-hop 
room . . . great talker . . . student, friend, humorist 
. . . kept Worcester informed of the activities on the 
Hill through his contributions to the Telegram . . . 
A man we won't forget. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3; Worcester Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at Classical High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Albert Louis George 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

575 Grafton Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Smallest in stature of the Worcester contingent . . . 
highest in ambition and industry . . . managed to 
knock the pre-med course for a loop . . . finished off 
the scholastic side of life with marks of merit in phil- 
osophy ... his "tough subject" . . . "Curly" was a 
constant companion of Rapinchuk . . . ardent foe 
of Joe Foley . . . debating in re the pulchritude of 
Worcester's average girl . . . Admired the profs most 
for their ability to unnerve him at exam time . . . 
and surprise him at the results . . . Rationing saw 



his car garaged . . . and Worcester '43 late for first 
period . . . for generosity was not the least of his 
virtues . . . Most boarders were ignorant of the fact 
that his last name was not his first . . . the only pre- 
med who personally conquered Mr. Charest . . . Prom- 
enade-time gave evidence of his social ability . . . 
never at a loss for work . . . whether it was in school 
or at the store . . . Al made a habit of it . . . 
Medicine will be lucky to embrace a man of his habits 
and demeanor. 



Purple Patcher 4; Tomahawk 1, 2; 
Scientific Society, Secretary 3, President 
4. 

Prepared at Brooklyn Preparatory 

School 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Raymond Peter Ghelardi 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

88 Buckingham Road 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



The physicist . . . with a flair for the unusual . . . 
Physics is for him a study, a hobby and a future life 
work . . . his weird experiments sometimes played 
havoc with our radios, but Science must progress . . . 
Dabbled in many fields — radio, higher mathematics, 
photography . . . the latter won him the appointment 
as staff photographer of the Patcher . . . oppressed 
by his roommate, Hartcorn . . . One of the Powers- 
that-be of the Scientific Society . . . sang in the shower 
room . . . "Racing With the Moon" . . . Disdained 
the comic section . . . Took to softball in senior 



year playing with the now famous Wheeler I scoreless 
wonders . . . Had an infernal machine which, he 
claimed, would print a newspaper via radio flashes . . . 
Got up at 3 A.M. one morning to prove it . . . 
Stubbornly wore his topcoat and gray felt until 
Memorial Day . . . Sported a pipe junior year . . . 
Once said of ye editor, Barone, playing softball, "He 
has a moment of inertia of 100" . . . Serious . . . 
studious, friendly . . . We'll remember Ray for his 
devotion to his chosen field. 




Intramural Debating 2 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 2, 3, 4; 
Springfield Club 2; Holyoke Club 1. 

Prepared at Hebron Academy 
Hebron, Me. 



Albert Blaise Biknis 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

94 L Street 
Turners Falls, Mass. 



Medium height . . . sturdy body . . . round face 
. . . shining eyes . . . straight dark hair . . . de- 
termined not to stay in place . . . picture of the 
diligent student from Turners Falls . . . one of the 
laboring, serious-minded B.S. biology students . . . 
"Gigs" really concentrated on his difficult course . . . 
steady, ambitious . . . constantly striving for his care- 
fully-chosen goal . . . His career comes first in 
everything he does . . . yet we have come to know 
him well ... a happy, friendly sort of chap . . . 
always a good word . . . Kept himself in excellent 
physical condition . . . vigorous player on the in- 



tramural field . . . Genial host at midnight feasts 
. . . his pyrex steamer could cook almost anything 
. . . Never could study until after eleven P.M. . . . 
then would curl up comfortably in his arm chair . . . 
in deep meditation . . . Everyone was welcome in 
his domain . . . Teller of tales . . . appreciative 
listener . . . enjoyed telling of his summer job . . . 
touring the countryside in a bakery wagon ... A 
lad who is contented in his work . . . with an op- 
timistic outlook on life . . . will add happiness to the 
lives of others. 



Sodality 2; Track 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Ayer High School 
Ayer, Mass. 




Charles Peter Gillis 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

31 Shaker Road 
Shirley, Mass. 



Slow of speech . . . fleet of foot . . . Charley's 
Yankee drawl gave his French a peculiar accent . . . 
but it served him well in verbal battles with Coach 
Sullivan . . . unvanquished in argument . . . Charley 
O'Donnell will never forget the four-hour debate on 
the Bowdoin trip . . . Famed for such sterling phrases 
as "Over my dead grave" and "happy and easy-go- 
lucky" . . . Claimed in freshman year that studying 
made him too tired to run more than a 220 . . . but 
Bart made him a quarter-miler ... So the Shirley 



Speedster joined the relay team and saw New York 
. . . found sociability at the "G. A." . . . "with the 
college crowd" . . . Made one bad investment: a car 
. . . found the hills on the way to Framingham too 
long and too steep . . . discarded said car when he had 
to use his best overcoat to keep the radiator from 
freezing . . . But our friendship with you was a 
good investment, Charley . . . keep your eyes on 
the tape ! 




Intramural Debating 1 ; Yacht Club 4 ; 
Intramural Sports 2; Boston Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at Coyle High School 
Taunton, Mass. 



Charles J. G i 1 I n n . Jr. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

52 Broadway 
Taunton, Mass. 



"Chucklin' " Charlie they called him . . . one of the 
best natured . . . and incidentally best-dressed men 
on the campus . . . Arrow collar man and all that 
when he stepped out on a date . . . shows a sea-going 
interest in water craft of all types and is the proud 
skipper of his own boat . . . Found those early morn- 
ing classes almost too much to take ... in spite of 
his Pre-Med course, Charlie is always a ready fourth 
at bridge . . . plays a professional game . . .Super- 
abundance of wit, good humor and friendliness . . . 



Steve will forever be indebted to him for his generous 
offer on the Dartmouth week-end . . . Engaged in 
titanic struggles with Emery down on the tennis courts 
. . . moviegoer . . . can take the girls or leave them 
alone . . . Lost four roommates in four years . . . 
all to the armed services . . . Never effusive in manner 
. . . always friendly and easy-going . . . we'll all 
miss Charlie ... his ready smile . . . and the kick 
he got out of life . . . we wish him the best of luck 
. . . keep smiling, Chuck. 



Sodality 1, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4, Secretary 
4; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Aquinas 
Circle, President 4; History Academy 
1, 2; Varsity Debating 3, 4; Honorary 
President, Class of '46; Alpha Sigma 
Nu 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir 1; 
Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Labor 
Academy 2, 3, 4; Brockton Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Riding Club 1, 2. 

Prepared at Brockton High School 
Brockton, Mass. 




Edward Gilmore 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

271 Plain Street 
Brockton, Mass. 



A shrewd beano player who frequently reaped a goodly 
reward . . . debater of renown whose sincerity and 
strength of conviction will be hard to replace . . . 
lover of the fine art of dancing . . . member of the 
Glee Club for two years . . . sacrificed his musical 
career for a naval one . . . perfect host at dinner 
parties to the extent of serving Turns after the dessert 
. . . attends the races occasionally to test his "intuitive 
vision" . . . member in good standing in the "after 
lights club" of Beaven III where he waged many 
conversational battles far into the night . . . industri- 



ous Mission Crusader . . . His sincerity, diligence and 
generosity made him Honorary President of the Fresh- 
man Class . . . master of the reductw ad absurdum 
argument . . . Made friends easily and, more im- 
portant, kept them . . . meticulous dresser — owned a 
collection of hats that would turn Mamie Reilly green 
with envy . . . had a red-and-white striped sport 
coat two years before the Zoot suit came into vogue 
. . . Dependable . . . sincere . , . consistent . . . 
and an all-around good fellow. 




Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Labor Academy 1, 2, 3; Penn Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Patrick's High School 
Scranton, Pa. 



Robert Patrick Gilroy 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

805 North Main Avenue 
Scranton, Pa. 



Happy-go-lucky Bob . . . one of the biggest and 
heaviest representatives of our freshman class . . . 
Hails from Scranton . . . forsook the surrounding 
Catholic colleges to come to Mt. St. James . . . Dis- 
tinguished member of the Untrustworthy Triumvirate 
with Sartorelli and Quinn . . . has a special laugh all 
of his own ... an ancient ol' rain-hat which is the 
object of everybody's affections . . . Butt of many 
practical jokes . . . envied for his good nature . . . 
always willing to lend a helping hand . . . The letters 
that he doesn't write to the illustrious women of Wor- 



cester have cemented many friendships ... so many 
that when the summer vacation came, he was glad to 
depart . . . Then there was the time Burke told him 
about Yale . . . Member of the Labor Academy 
. . . Secretary of the Pennsylvania Club . . . par- 
ticipant in intramural sports . . . Got his pilot's 
license in junior year . . . C. A. A. . . . often seen 
heading for Grafton Airport . . . prepared for the 
"big job" to come . . . All in all, Bob, we're mighty 
glad you stayed with us. 



Intramural Debating 3, 4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 
3, 4; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Mary's High School 
Westfield, Mass. 




Charles J. Blavin, Jr 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

1 Church Street 
Stockbridge, Mass. 



A man of very cosmopolitan habits . . . fundamentally 
a resident of Worcester . . . stayed in Clinton during 
his four years at the Cross . . . yet his home address 
is in the Berkshires . . . Charlie . . . Man of many 
accomplishments . . . conducted a profitable business 
. . . "ferried" many a Clintonite to school in his 
time . . . Much sought after a few days before foot- 
ball week-ends . . . member of the B. T. O. com- 
bination of Glavin, Sharry, and Staruk . . . cheerful 
disposition . . . Ardent intramuralite . . . excelled 
in baseball . . . proficient ball-handler for the great 



Worcester '43 team . . . Executive aide for the Easter 
Dance of the Worcester Club in junior year . . . was 
never lost in the social functions . . . Inseparable pal 
of one Dick . . . together they followed the football 
team . . . one of the few Cross men seen at Hamilton 
in '41 . . . Took the Penology course to round out 
his education . . . so he claims . . . Standout in the 
Naval Reserve Course . . . among the first to enlist 
. . . inclined towards Naval Aviation . . . Many 
happy landings, Charlie . . . you can't miss . . . 
you're right on the beam. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4; Inter- 
collegiate Debate Secretary 4; Aquinas 
Circle 4; Varsity Debating 3, 4; Lec- 
ture Debating 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 
1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; French 
Academy 1, 2, 4; Maine Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at John Bapst High School 
Bangor, Me. 



Paul II ii in i i! ii Gleason 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

239 Essex Street 
Bangor, Me. 



The gentlemanly acolyte from Bangor . . . our most 
respected Senior . . . seen in the constant company of 
Lovering . . . His industry was acknowledged by all 
his classmates . . . voted the hardest worker in senior 
class . . . the steadying influence in the Gleason-Foley 
combine . . . Fran's reliable counselor . . . Con- 
scientious president of the Sanctuary Society . . . with 
Stanard's assistance, kept the organization going like 
clockwork . . . supplied Mass servers for the sixty-odd 
priests on the campus . . . also ran the Mission Crusade 
. . . under his direction it approached highest peak 
in Holy Cross history . . . Spent hour after hour in 



the library preparing for some exam or other . . . 
. . . couldn't understand how the Frenchmen could 
speak French so well . . . B. J. F. stalwart . . . dil- 
igent manager of intercollegiate debates . . . almost 
went crazy following out Prexy Conroy's orders . . . 
rewarded with a trip to Williamstown . . . Amiable 
target of Bubby's ribbing . . . stood up well under it 
. . . as he does under anything . . . The model stu- 
dent . . . loyal to everything that was Holy Cross 
. . . orator, executive, friend . . . All in all a man 
of whom the Centennial Class may well be proud. 



Sodality 1, 2; Scientific Society 3. 

Prepared at St. Mary's Academy 
Milford, Mass. 




Vincent Paul Gnddard 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

22 Capron Street 
Uxbridge, Mass. 



"Doc" — of taciturnity and good nature . . . measured 
things scientific with industry . . . kept his room- 
mate Jose gasping at his intricate maneuverings with 
the slide rule . . . Perhaps the least ostentatious man 
in the class and the most assiduous . . . never would 
admit that philosophy is a science . . . The Pipe was 
his fondest possession . . . "Doc's Mixture" was ex- 
tolled by those fortunate enough to get there first and 
thus take advantage of his generosity . . . For hobbies 
he preferred hunting and fishing . . . they were the 
only subjects upon which he'd wax eloquent to any 



extent . . . except, of course, physics and math . . . 
A man of the old school . . . consistent . . . optimistic 
. . . and understanding . . . broke all records for 
absent-mindedness in junior when he contrived an elec- 
trical apparatus that resembled the back of a Grand 
Central switchboard . . . then required a consultation 
with a lab instructor to find that the reason it didn't 
produce results was that he had forgotten to turn on 
the juice . . . the world of science will take to "Doc" 
. . . Good luck, Mr. Slide Rule. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; History Academy 1, 
2; Intramural Sports 2, 3; Band 3; 
Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Framingham High School 
Framingham, Mass. 



Edward Francis Graham 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

25 Edwards Street 
Saxonville, Mass. 



Ed . . . Fran . . . noted for his ability to race from 
his native Saxonville to the Hill in forty minutes . . . 
chauffeur of the Framingham crew . . . renowned 
for his prowess in plowing through snow and sleet 
. . . will turn his Dodge in for one of Uncle Sam's 
B-19's in February . . . Spends his idle moments 
passing out rationed sugar at a local grocery . . . 
Familiar figure at those noted sessions in the "caf" 
. . . Conscientious student of philosophy . . . always 
ready to clarify an ethical problem . . . Mainstay in 
accounting class . . . The mere mention of turkeys 



will garner you an invitation to his newest business 
enterprise ... a farm for homeless turkeys . . . 
Makes regular appearances in the social set each sea- 
son . . . Pet yearning: to drive a Greyhound bus 
. . . may be fulfilled someday . . . Plans to enter 
the teaching profession . . . Ardent sports enthusiast 
. . . accomplished second-baseman . . . Performed 
like a Harry James in the band . . . Has a mania for 
brown suits and loud ties . . . Steadfast and strong 
. . . reliability personified . . . one who watched the 
world go by through rose-colored glasses. 



Intramural Debating 1, 2; History Acad- 
emy 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 
4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. John's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 




George Vita Greska 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

37 Houghton Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Meet the future Marine lieutenant ! . . . George plans 
on making a trip to Quantico for a while . . . then 
to Tokyo . . . One of the best students on the Hill 
. . . spent many free hours in a library alcove . . . 
good accountant . . . smooth dancer . . . energetic 
and confident . . . George had a slow, concise, fascin- 
ating way of telling a story . . . always interwoven 
with humor . . . expressed surprise by whistling 
through his teeth . . . conveyed disapproval with his 
eyebrows . . . Wore a serious look . . . until some 



funny incident would make his face brighten up and 

burst into a full smile . . . Social organizer . . . 

helped run numerous dances . . . one of the beauty 

judges at the Bancroft in 1941 . 

well in a difficult position . . , 

him . . . neither did life 

powerful gang in the cafeteria . 

George missed some sleep nights . . . but he never 

made it up in class . . . Always friendly . . . always 

welcome at a party . . . always a Holy Cross man. 



. . . acquitted himself 
Philosophy never fazed 
. . . Member of a 
. . good listener . . . 







Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission 
Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Boston Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at Chelea High School 
Chelsea, Mass. 



John Joseph G r i q a s 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

36 Jefferson Avenue 
Chelsea, Mass. 



From out of Chelsea he came, but his fame went the 
nation over . . . All-America John, hard-hitting over 
the guards or fast around the ends . . . the fullback 
who made the sports writers give notice and take up 
where they left off after Bill Osmanski's reign . . . 
Scored the three touchdowns that beat L. S. U. at 
Baton Rouge . . . led the ground-gainers the nation 
over . . . named by Frank Leahy as the most valuable 
player in the country ... all in his junior year . . . 
three-year star on Fitton . . . just as admirable without 
his football uniform . . . Idolized by every kid in 



Worcester . . . appreciated by those who knew him 
best . . . Next to football his love was for a well- 
stocked trout stream . . . real outdoor man . . . 
Trips to Maine for fish or game were always welcomed, 
and always brought the best of results . . . for Johnny 
never seemed to do anything wrong . . . Studied 
earnestly . . . enjoyed good movies and dropped eggs 
or asparagus tips over steak more than dancing . . . 
quiet . . . considerate . . . cheerful . . . Holy 
Cross' famous son. 



Sodality 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 
2 ; Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Arlington High School 
Arlington, Mass. 




William Paul Guiney 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

51 Poplar Street 
Belmont, Mass. 



"Tiny," man of metamorphosis . . . amazed his 
fellow students by dropping from a sturdy 230 pounds 
to a sylph-like 175 . . . did it for the Marines . . . 
the army tried to draft him . . . the Marines wouldn't 
let him go . . . Pedaled thousands of miles on the 
gymnasium bikes . . . Ran a courtesy bus service to 
Belmont every Saturday afternoon . . . Had a screw 
driver for every possible piece of mechanism . . . 
Took the Biology course on the Hill because he had 
eliminated everything else . . . transferred his affec- 
tions to things electrical when the Marines beckoned 
. . . The Sodality's ideal man to give the May talk 



on "Mary and Our Armed Forces" . . . Weakness for 
weird shirts and ties and, of course, saddle shoes . . . 
Would show up at Kimball with an orange and an 
apple . . . claimed he came just for the conversation 
. . . authority on the cuisine at the Infirmary . . . 
chronic worrier . . . almost convinced himself that 
he'd flunk his Junior oral . . . Defended everything 
in Belmont vigorously ... an enigma inasmuch as 
he had a woman but no woman trouble . . . could 
drive to Nahant blindfolded . . . amiable . . . 
consistent ... a hard worker . . . Bill, a good friend 
who can take it. 




Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 
1 ; Labor Academy 1 ; Worcester Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Peter's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Chester Joseph Gustowski 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

83V2 Ward Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Blond . . . quiet . . . ambitious . . . studious . . . 
that's the Chet we know . . . Came to the Cross with 
an enviable record in athletics . . . three sport star in 
high school ... on the Hill, Chet concentrated on 
his best sport . . . basketball . . . Never one to be 
caught napping . . . brilliant Economics student . . . 
Charter member of Holy Cross' rejuvenated basketball 
era . . . played sparkling ball for the Crusaders . . . 
High point of his college basketball career . . . the 
Rhode Island State game in junior year . . . the 
Cross almost upset the powerful Rams . . . Star of 



the Worcester '43 Freshman basketball team . . . in- 
tramuralites gasped when our Chet popped impossible 
one-handed shots from all angles . . . Keen student 
. . . possessor of a truly analytic mind . . . received 
the maximum from each class . . . Learned early in 
his college career the true Holy Cross spirit . . . 
"follow through in the classroom . . . on the athletic 
field . . . in the gym" ... It has been a delightful 
experience to know him ... a credit to his Alma 
Mater. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Scientific Society 4; 
Track 1, 2; Mission Crusade 3, 4; 
North Shore Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Salem Classical High School 
Salem, Mass. 




Wallace Francis Haley, Jr 



ACHELOR OF ARTS 

35 Pleasant Street 
Salem, Mass. 



In the broad sense of the phrase we introduce our 
"Jekyll and Hyde of the Class of '43" . . . Wally! 
. . . Our quiet and seemingly unassuming colleague 
. . . brought much publicity to his honorable name 
through his reckless exploits ... A take-the-con- 
sequence gambler of varied sorts . . . has yet to win 
a bet, but is an admirable loser . . . Lost on Willkie, 
and had to push a beer can across the Quadrangle 
with his nose . . . The first to organize his own tackle 
football squad for Sunday games . . . "All- American" 



for a day . . . Ran some of our best track men into 
the ground with his burning quarter-mile . . . Mission 
Crusader ... A Section A man from 'way back . . . 
devout member of the Sodality . . . North Shore 
Clubber . . . Generous with those yummy home-baked 
goodies that didn't come from home . . . Three cheers 
for El! . . . the splashing "Gunga Din" of Kimball 
. . . the ledgewalker of Fenwick ... a sincere 
premedic . . . Wally, through thick and thin. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; History Academy 2, 
3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Mission 
Crusade 1, 2; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Library 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Classical High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Edward James Harrington 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

9 South Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



You all know Eddie, the lad with the perpetual dark 
suit . . . and the perpetual bright smile . . . Climbed 
to the honor roll first year . . . remained there ever 
since . . . Always ready to help you in the few 
minutes before class . . . joined the library staff as 
a freshman . . . Eddie was entrusted with its care 
during the summer months . . . knows the location 
of every book in the stacks . . . Day Students' chief 
guide to Boston . . . often led parties of fellow stu- 
dents through the maze of subways and of streets and 



squares . . . baseball fan, he had childlike faith in 
the Red Sox . . . probably his darkest moment was 
when he organized a bowling tournament . . . was 
eliminated in the first round . . . always able to trounce 
his partner, Bill O'Neil, with his wicked cross alley 
ball . . . combining his ability as a mathematician 
and his training in education, he was an ideal tutor 
. . . and more than one student owes a passing grade 
in algebra to the erstwhile librarian, butcher (union) 
and the future teacher, Eddie Harrington. 



Intramural Debating 1, 2 ; Aquinas Cir- 
cle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanc- 
tuary Society 1, 2; Mission Crusade 3, 
4; French Academy 1, 2; Rhode Island 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Fall River Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at De La Salle Academy 
Newport, R. I. 




Edward Philip Harrington 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Highland Road 
Tiverton, R. I. 



Big Ed ! . . . genial and witty . . . with a heart to 
match his big frame . . . No smokes? . . . See Ed 
. . . tided Wheeler I over some of the bad spots 
. . . almost a fixture on the intramuralite fields . . . 
made his presence really felt . . . be it football, base- 
ball or basketball . . . avid Red Sox rooter . . . 
close follower of the national pastime . . . Also a 
frequent spectator of the table tennis games in Wheeler 
on Saturday afternoons . . . faithful sodalist for three 
years . . . stalwart of the Mission Crusade . . . good 
student . . . should do things in the field of economics 



. . . Often seen with McGah and Murphy . . . 
Upheld the honor of the East although outnumbered 
. . . Can we ever forget his closeting of McGah 
thrice in an hour? ... A much envied bystander at 
that embrace me scene in the Statler, B. C. week-end 
. . . Never quite recovered from the shock . . . 
turned socialite in his junior year . . . made many 
appreciated appearances in the city ... Is headed 
for business but signed up with the Navy . . . they 
only have to teach him to be an officer . . . He's a 
gentleman already. 




Tennis 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Band 2; French Academy 1, 2; Metro- 
politan Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at La Salle Military Academy 
Oakdale, L. I. 



John Adam Hartcorn 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

104 Buckingham Road 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Our handsome, young Atlas from Brooklyn . . . loyal 
to the home town . . . sick abed when "Dem Bums" 
lost the pennant . . . Possessor of an enviable physique 
. . . result of religious devotion to his strenuous con- 
ditioning program . . . Alert and probing mind . . . 
had to know the reason for everything . . . wasn't 
satisfied with proximate causes . . . "There must be 
something behind it" . . . haunted Jim Dooley until 
he knew why the Midnight Sun didn't set . . . 
Thoroughness won him admirable grades in the Eco- 
nomics Course . . . One of Raymond's rabid fans . . . 



until both joined forces in a terrific business enterprise 
. . . Ray supplied intricate mathematical problems 
. . . Jack supplied the money to be paid out to the 
genius who could solve them . . . Barone and Whelan 
broke the bank the first night . . . Play-spotter for the 
A. A.'s football movies . . . will long remember the 
trip to Temple . . . somewhat of a social lion . . . 
Plagued Wheeler I with air pistols and water guns 
. . . Lone survivor of the La Salle contingent in '43 
. . . model product of a military school training . . . 
His persistence won't let him quit. 



History Academy 3 ; French Academy 3 ; 
Spanish Academy 1. 

Prepared at Marlboro High School 
Marlboro, Mass. 




Charles Henry Haskell, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

14 Lambert Street 
Marlboro, Mass. 



Tall . . . erect . . . raw-boned . . . debonair . . . 
inevitable homburg and pencil stripe . . . generous 
. . . happy-go-lucky and a rugged individualist if there 
ever was one . . . chit-chat artist of "Cafe Society" 
. . . always willing to take the side of the underdog 
. . . Will take off verbally on any thing from Carl 
Marx to dogwood . . . with a cigar in his mouth 
. . . tilted chair . . . could talk the best of us down 
... a student of music . . . classical, sir . . . had 
definite unprintable ideas on swing . . . tried hard 
to be a sohpist but could be counted on in the pinches 



. . . Wore grooves in the Boston Turnpike . . . 

Faithful Model A and if need be, the uplifted thumb 
carried him to Beantown . . . France is his major in- 
terest ... its history and language . . . tried to 
corrupt Barone in the caf after lunch every day . . . 
sodality man . . . stout fellow in ye History Society 
. . . always good for a loan . . . Important trips or 
dates were telegraphed by his dress . . . the neiv 
homburg . . . neatly pressed suit . . . and a fresh 
cigar . . . Suave — the one word definition of Charley. 




Sodality 1; Intramural Sports 2. 

Prepared at St. John's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



John David Hassett, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

13 Blithewood Avenue 
Worcester, Mass. 



"Red!" . . . the human talking machine . . . never 
ran out of words . . . could make the hours seem like 
seconds . . . always a hearty handshake and greeting 
for everybody . . . never complained about anything 
. . . has a perennially optimistic point of view . . . 
was once an air-raid warden . . . when he heard about 
the 'blackout parties' that were being held in the 
neighborhood he joined the fun . . . The only man 
on the Hill, besides MacDowell, who can sleep through 
a "hot foot" . . . pleasing personality . . . good 
student when he put his mind to it . . . walking en- 



cyclopedia . . . has a sincere appreciation of Nature 
. . . dog-lover . . . has been the victim of many a 
practical joke . . . always takes them in good humor 
. . . is a friend of the give you the shirt off his back 
school . . . witty . . . quick ... an accomplished 
golfer . . . fast with the tennis racket . . . never 
without a twinkle in his eyes . . . dependable and 
straightforward . . . ardent sports enthusiast . . . 
Has a philosophy of life that has helped to cheer 
many a fellow-student . . . the Cross will miss him. 



Sodality 4 ; Intramural Debating 3 ; 
Tomahawk 1, 2, 3, 4, Circulation Man- 
ager 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
French Academy 1, 2; Hartford Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Ellsworth Memorial High 

School 

South Windsor, Conn. 




Thomas Francis Hickey 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

135 Long Hill Road 
East Hartford, Conn. 



"Hick" . . . "Tabasco" . . . true son of the soil 
. . . could talk farming at you for hours on end . . . 
Tobacco growing his speciality . . . Developed a Greek 
god physique working around the farm during the 
summer breathers . . . Had a bout with Scarlet 
Fever in his junior year . . . Came back to breed 
discontent with tall tales of gorgeous nurses . . . 
Drove many a Worcester heart to distraction with his 
hard-to-get routine . . . Holding one of the toughest 
but least publicized jobs on the "Rag" ... it was 
Tom who major-domoed T omahaivk distribution on 



Tuesday nights . . . Was often seen with Higgins 
and Roj Smith . . . Persistently set the alarm clock 
for 5:30 every morning . . . never got up though 
. . . looks eagerly forward to a workout with the 
Marines . . . Pointing toward law but not until skies 
are clearer . . . had the largest collection of law 
school catalogues . . . ever seen in Beaven . . . In- 
tensely argumentative . . . should make a good de- 
fense lawyer ... a good friend ... a man's man 
. . . honest Tom Hick. 




Sodality 1, 2; Tomahawk 1, 2; Scien- 
tific Society 4 ; Cross and Scroll 2 ; Foot- 
ball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
French Academy 1, 2; Fall River Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at B. M. C. Durfee High 

School 

Fall River, Mass. 



Thomas Francis Higgins 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

967 Madison Street 
Fall River, Mass. 



The sturdy one . . . has acquired a weird collection of 
nicknames . . . will answer to "Sam," "Fe-herb" 
and "Jumbo," among others . . . Tommy's big mo- 
ment and one he never gets tired of retelling is the 
time, when, as an aspiring freshman footballer, he 
had to tackle Grigas ... In his own words, "I 
couldn't get out of the way, so what could I do" . . . 
amiable Sam . . . everybody accusing him of some- 
thing he never did . . . Has his philosophic moments, 
however . . . always has an amazing theory of his own 
. . . easy going manner and swell disposition hide 



a keen analytical mind that will take him far in his 
medical profession . . . Likes to play golf . . . only 
when the weather is hot . . . believes in the old 
axiom, "24 hours sleep never hurt anyone" . . . 
consequently looks forward to that inevitable sprint to 
beat the doors at morning Mass . . . often assumes the 
position of referee in the regular Merritt-Cummings 
wrestling bouts . . . his correspondence is watched 
with paternal interest by the "Fraternity" . . . Tom, 
one to count on when things get tough. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; History Academy 1, 

2, 3, 4; Baseball 1; Milford Club 1, 2, 

3, 4; Framingham Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Framingham High School 
Framingham, Mass. 




Thomas Henry Hobin 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

5 Webster Street 
Framingham, Mass. 



Our smiling Irish lad from Framingham . . . nephew 
of the famous Jim Hobin of '36 football glory . . . 
made his own reputation on the Hill . . . Star athlete 
at Framingham High . . . slight stature a disadvantage 
in varsity athletics . . . great competitor in intramurals 
. . . many a bruised muscle bore Tom's seal . . . 
Held down the corner table in the caf with Martell 
and Coyne . . . presided at all meetings at said table 
. . . Consistent student . . . Future V-7 Ensign 
. . . the Chief's favorite pupil . . . constant source 
of amusement for that popular professor . . . that 



distinctive laugh . . . Together with O'Toole proved 
his domestic qualities at Regis . . . both have been in 
demand ever since . . . Quietest biologist Mr. Camp- 
bell ever had . . . Still striving to cure a cold he's had 
since sophomore year in high school . . . forgot to 
wear a sweat shirt for football practice . . . Extolled 
the finer points of Ken's . . . True Irish wit . . . 
kept many a classmate in good humor . . . countless 
students gathered to hear Prof. Hobin's Cafeteria lec- 
tures . . . Life's road won't have many detours for Tom. 




B. J. F. 3, 4; Dramatic Society 2; Play- 
shop 2 ; Aquinas Circle 4 ; Varsity De- 
bating 3, 4; Lecture Debating 3, 4; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary So- 
ciety 1, 2; Band 2, 3; French Academy 
1; Labor Academy 3, 4; Central New 
York Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Augustine's Academy 
Carthage, N. Y. 



John Thomas Hourigan 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

751 Fulton Street 
Carthage, N. Y. 



A hard worker . . . wanted to know why ? . . . upstate 
New Yorker . . . claims he has learned practically all 
there is to know since he arrived freshman year . . . 
for a time he was the silent partner of the trio, Dobbyn, 
Leach, and Hourigan . . . became more articulate as 
a B. J. F. stalwart until one fatal night over WORC 
. . . lost his alarm clock but ignored the round hole 
in his window as a possible explanation . . . fond of 
sports of all kinds . . . and of basketball especially 
. . . never missed a game . . . one of the first to 



sign up with the Naval V-7 program . . . Jack tried 
to absorb all the math offered on the Hill . . . rather 
on the quiet side, but became a feared debater . . . 
many an unwary lad has aroused Jack and found him- 
self impaled on a "quickie" . . . Starting as an intra- 
mural debater . . . elected to the varsity of the B. J. F. 
during junior year . . . sincere, loyal, and dependable 
... a real friend to all who knew him . . . luck to 
him, but we feel he'll make his own. 



Intramural Sports 3, 4; Ohio Club 3, 4; 
Midwest Club 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Vincent's Preparatory 

School 

Akron, O. 




James Henry Jahant 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

136 Clemmer Avenue 
Akron, O. 



Descended into our midst at the beginning of junior 
year . . . from John Carroll . . . genial Jim . . . 
deceivingly quiet at times . . . eyes sparkling . . . 
hearty laugh . . . never seemed to hurry, but beneath 
his slouch and easy-going manner was a remarkable 
determination ... A frequent visitor to New York 
and Manhattanville . . . Dressed with becoming 
abandon . . . continually poised . . . unruffled . . . 
ready with a quip at a moment's notice . . . Favorite 
jokes and sayings could usually be traced back to Jim 
. . . Extolled the virtues of Akron aided and abetted 



by "Doc" . . . Talented on the Intramural field . . . 
entertaining raconteur . . . enjoyed a joke . . . clever 
imitator . . . defendant in a sensational mock-trial 
. . . His idea of a complete waste of time was going 
to the movies . . . very sensible and always knew what 
and what not to do . . . took great pleasure in the 
ordinary things of life . . . which many take for 
granted . . . combination humorist and business man 
. . . and successful at both . . . Will long remember 
New Year's Eve spent at school . . . future Ensign 
. . . amusing . . . likeable Jim. 







Intramural Debating 1, 2 ; Dramatic So- 
ciety 1, 2, 3, Business Manager 3; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Tomahawk 2, 
3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Purple 
Key 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Wisconsin 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4. 

Prepared at Marquette University High 

School 

Milwaukee, Wis. 



David V. Jennings, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

7715 West Wisconsin Avenue 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 



Popular and well-known man-about-campus . . . and 
future Ensign in the Naval Reserve . . . Milwaukee's 
gift to the class of '43 . . . Always immaculate in 
attire and usually soft-spoken . . . preferred to say 
he hailed from Milwaukee, but when pushed into a 
corner, could be forced to admit that his home town 
was Wauwatosa . . . prominent in intramural sports 
. . . mainstay of the Sanctuary Society and Sodality 
... a good man on any basketball squad . . . and 
a faithful one at the early Massses . . . Sang bass in 



the Glee Club for four years . . . and has really be- 
come an institution thereof . . . caused many a 
feminine heart flutter as he toured with the musical 
clubs ... In junior year he was tagged "Clark" . . . 
when he adopted those snappy glasses . . . was 
elected to the Purple Key . . . worthy opponent at 
the bridge table . . . scholar of ability . . . add a 
sense of humor, a large measure of consideration, an 
optimistic outlook on things . . . and you have our 
Dave. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3 ; Intra- 
mural Debating 1, 2; Varsity Debating 
3 ; Lecture Debating 3 ; Basketball 1 ; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2, 3; Purple Key 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Chairman 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Mis- 
sion Crusade 1, 2, 3; French Academy 
1, 2; North Shore Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Prepared at St. John's Preparatory 
School 




Danvers, Mass. 




9S «t 



/ 



• 




Richard G. Johnson 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

13 Shetland Road 
Marblehead, Mass. 



The man with fun in his eye . . . Prominent member 
of the St. John's Prep baseball, football and basketball 
teams . . . "D" confined his athletic activities here on 
the Hill to intramural sports . . . and he certainly 
made good . . . Silver-tongued debater in freshman 
and sophomore years ... he captained the Soph 
B championship team under the watchful guidance of 
Fr. Bean . . . stood out in the colorful B. J. F. . . . 
was selected to the varsity debating squad . . . made 
the Purple Key the middle of freshman year . . . was 



elected chairman senior year . . . faithful collector 
for the Mission Crusade . . . Became an ardent ad- 
herent to the treacherous game of golf . . . now we 
can't keep him away from the links . . . Good natured 
. . . both a man's man . . . and a ladies' man . . . 
played the field . . . Mainstay of the tenor section 
of the Glee Club for four years . . . helped supply 
spark to the concerts . . . amused his roommate and 
was abused by said individual ... a truly representa- 
tive Cross man . . . we're going to miss him. 




Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 3; Labor Acad- 
emy 3; Waterbury Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Con- 
necticut Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Crosby High School 
Waterbury, Conn. 



Thomas Francis Eeane 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

503 Baldwin Street 
Waterbury, Conn. 



"The Tiger" ... or just plain "Tige" . . . the man 
whose baptismal name was known only to a privileged 
few . . . Quiet, reserved and sincere . . . Forsook a 
potentially brilliant varsity baseball career in Freshman 
year . . . became an Intramural star . . . the Mike 
Ryba of the league . . . played any position . . . 
Likewise a touch-tackle standout . . . one of the best 
blockers in the business . . . Loved an argument . . . 
defended the weak side of any topic, just for fun ... a 
good student . . . learned quickly . . . got high marks 



too . . . read every available magazine from cover to 
cover . . . including "America" . . . bought a dog- 
eared tome for a fine price in Sophomore year . . . 
turned out to be a bargain . . . Inveigled a few 
fellows to go walking with him . . . but only once 
... his "little jaunts" usually turned out to be a five- 
mile marathon . . . Loved to sleep late . . . but 
mended his ways upon request in junior year . . . 
Demonstrated in Carlin how a room should be cleaned 
... a good scout was "Tige." 




Intramural Debating 1, 2; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 
3, 4; Outing Club 2, 3, 4; French Acad- 
emy 1, 2; Haverhill Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Haverhill High School 
Haverhill Mass. 




John Joseph Kearney 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

15 Winona Avenue 
Haverhill, Mass. 



"J. J." . . . tall, dark, handsome he-man from Haver- 
hill . . . carefree but dependable . . . gracious man- 
ner . . . dashing smile . . . ruddy cheeks . . . 
and massive frame . . . Worried over nothing, but 
accomplished everything he set out for . . . For four 
years never angry, but gave and took ribbing with a 
constant chuckle . . . lost his sparkling smile for a 
while after an encounter on the Intramural football 
field . . . Proud of his year-around tan . . . Success- 
ful in everything he did . . . sports . . . studies . . . 
learned easily and thoroughly ... a quick thinker 
. . . Firm believer in long week-ends in New York 



. . . where on one occasion he gamboled with nobility 
and models . . . Teller of many interesting tales of 
his summers spent in Maine . . . Has always kept in 
tip-top physical condition . . . entered wholeheartedly 
into the physical training program . . . engaged in 
many spectacular boxing matches with Jack Ryan . . . 
followed by lengthy arguments on who was the victor 
. . . But the greatest battles were verbal ones with 
"Pooh" . . . One of the "gang" on Carlin III . . . 
and one of the avid bridge players . . . "Li'l Abner" 
himself . . . the boy who'll make good. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, Vice- 
President 4; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Dramatic Society 1, 2 ; Purple Patch- 
er 4, Research Editor 4; Purple 4; 
Tomahawk 1, 2, Associate Editor 3, 4; 
Aquinas Circle 4; History Academy 1, 
2, 3; Cross and Scroll 2, 3, 4; Varsity 
Debating 4; Track 1, 2, 3, Captain 4; 
Sanctuary Society 4 ; Labor Academy 3 ; 
Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Greek Play 1. 

Prepared at Milton High School 
Milton, Mass. 



Francis Joseph K e 1 I e y , Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

53 Parkway Crescent 
Milton, Mass. 



Gentleman . . . and scholar . . . Enjoyed the unique 
distinction of having to choose between a scholarship 
for athletics or one for studies . . . Father Dwyer 
called him "that reprobate, Mr. Kelley," probably be- 
cause of his widely publicized bout with pure grape- 
fruit juice of a New Year's Eve . . . Was undoubtedly 
Bart Sullivan's most conscientious athlete . . . sinned 
only by an excess of misplaced generosity . . . wit- 
ness the B. C. meet of '41 when he was so intent on 
letting a team-mate win the 880, he almost failed to 
place . . . Didn't know a finesse from a short-suit 



in freshman, but was a polished bridgideer by soph- 
omore . . . Made a name in dramatics by murdering 
one year and being murdered the next . . . vice- 
president of the B. J. F. . . . Bill Larson's associate 
on the Tomahawk . . . Made his home in Milton the 
mecca of opera-goers . . . Promoted the feud between 
his sister and Marty Conroy . . . was never com- 
pletely happy unless he was reading at least three 
books at a time, all on unconnected subjects . . . 
"Franny" ... far from superficial . . . and always 
anxious to lend a helping hand. 



Intramural Debating 2 ; Aquinas Circle 
4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission 
Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Boston Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at Boston Public Latin School 
Boston, Mass. 




Joseph Gerard Kelley 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

18 Hinckley Street 
Dorchester, Mass. 



Not the worryin' kind . . . saw the sunny side of 
everything . . . Was positive that checkered sport 
coats and checkered sport shirts were a 'sharp' com- 
bination . . . One of the brasshats in Kimball Senior 
year . . . raconteur of note and Munchausen of Beaven 
. . . the bane of Fischer's existence in freshman 
year . . . Refused to get excited about anything . . . 
they say that someone saw him hurry once . . 
Always had an extra cigarette . . . Acknowledged 
champ in the quick comeback department . . . ex- 
cept on one memorable occasion when Fr. Busam and 
Joe had a heart to heart . . . Helped perpetuate the 



Syracuse week-end ... by going sleepless for 48 
hours . . . Come the football season the sheets would 
disappear from someone's bed . . . and Joe would win 
another poster contest . . . Caused many a laugh 
. . . but could buckle down to the books when the 
occasion demanded . . . Wore rain coats at the oddest 
times . . . and had a shuffling gait that defied imitation 
. . . No stranger to the Intramural field . . . Came 
to us from Dorchester by way of Boston Latin . . . 
friendly . . . gay . . . and light-hearted ... as 
regular as they come. 




Sodality 1; B. J. F. 3, 4; Intramural 
Debating 1, 2; Varsity Debating 4; Lec- 
ture Debating 4; Worcester Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Peter's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Joseph Timothy Kenoeally 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

17 Abbott Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Poised, efficient, dignified . . . Joe startled his Section 
A classmates with his dazzling ties and fuzzy hats . . . 
Leasing a seat in the library freshman year, he main- 
tained his strategic position near the reference desk 
and consistently produced the fruits of his efforts in 
class . . . Never missed a musical that came to Boston 
. . . and had more than a spectator's interest in certain 
members of certain casts . . . B. J. F. meetings found 
him clarifying questions and bewildering opponents 
with his dynamic delivery . . . Joe rarely missed 



the Worcester Club social functions . . . Defied the 
scrap metal drive and science by trips to Boston in his 
lizzie . . . His magic act featuring a smooth line of 
patter stole the spotlight annually on Parent's Night 
. . . and proved that he did reach Boston on those 
trips . . . handed out many a "Magic in the Modern 
Manner — by Kenneally" card . . . Squeezed enough 
activity into twenty-four hours to do anyone else for 
a week . . . Confident and self-assured, Joe . . . who 
did magic tricks with time. 



Worcester Club 1 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Classical High School 
Worcester, Mass. 




Robert Richard Kiel y 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

41 Dover Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Composite of test tubes, integrals and Irish wit . . . 
Imperturbable Bob . . . whose theory was "Don't 
worry; it never gets you anywhere" . . . His witty 
remarks brightened many a drab lab . . . Dancing his 
favorite pastime . . . Took quite a hand in Worcester 
Club politics . . . Famed for his four-minute extem- 
poraneous speech in rhetoric class during which he 
said not a word . . . Respected authority on the quality 
of the current band at the Plymouth . . . Wizard in 
Math . . . Good-natured . . . bought countless cokes 
for boarder friends with insufficient funds . . . Expert 



behind the Montrose Dairy counter on week-ends . . . 
"Rode" Charlie Polachi with the greatest of delight 
. . . Member of the five o'clock Chemists' Club . . . 
headquarters, the caf . . . Tried unsuccessfully for four 
years to prove to anti-Worcesterites that Worcester was 
as good as any place . . . better than most . . . Ran 
into hard luck in lab once a year but always came out 
smilingly triumphant . . . favorite sport, basketball 
. . . proved his proficiency in the Barn during the 
winter months . . . Bob . . . with the smile and 
the chuckle on his lips. 




Sodality 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Baseball 1 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 
4 ; Mission Crusade 3 ; Rhode Island 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Stamp Committee 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Raphael Academy 
Pawtucket, R. I. 



Francis Stanley Kleniewski 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

239 Benefit Street 
Pawtucket, R. I. 



Small in stature but in spirit outstanding . . . Father 
Brennan likened him to "Bullet Bill" . . . Lover and 
master of football . . . endowed with a genuine Cru- 
sader spirit which will live long on Fitton's turf . . . 
Not restricted to the gridiron ... his play in the 
back court along with "Moe" McMahon almost brought 
Beaven II a basketball championship in junior year 
. . . People around Pawtucket claim he wields a mighty 
bat . . . Most conscientious academically of all our 
athletes . . . and perhaps of all the class . . . Took 



in more Masses in chapel and more shows in Kimball 
than is usual even for a Crusader . . . Humility and 
friendliness his greatest virtues . . . Always had his 
room full of his "boys" who labelled him "Fat," 
"F. P.," and "Kelly" . . . but his penchant for good- 
natured ribbing helped him outdo the jibes of "my 
illiterate friends" . . . Cull his only headache . . . 
Brilliant and hardworking . . . quiet and diligent . . . 
manly and unostentatiously Catholic . . . Hailed as the 
best-natured man's man to hit the Hill in many a day. 



Sodality 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 
2 ; Intramural Sports 2, 3 ; New Hamp- 
shire Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Magazine Collec- 
tion Bureau 3, 4. 



Prepared at Conant High School 
East Jaffrey, N. H. 




a u 



is A. L 



a n q e v l n 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

River Street 
East Jaffrey, N. H. 



Happy Lou . . . once in a while he got ferocious with 
McMahon . . . but only after he had laughed and 
pondered . . . One of the Campion contingent known 
for their attempts to enlighten Gillis by inverting his 
bed . . . but Lou was always on the other side . . . 
"protecting my roommate, Charlie" . . . Pre-med for 
three years . . . then an English student . . . Father 
Gallagher's favorite object of interrogation . . . News 
from the outside world crept to Lou via the Mon- 
adnock Recorder . . . "Waited on" fancifully . . . 
was the Good Provider for the frequent banquets of the 



Fat Men's Club to which he reluctantly belonged . . . 
"Blackie" never missed a trick ... if one got by him 
he went after it uncompromisingly . . . Lou will never 
forget meeting Fischer at the door of Becker unexpect- 
edly . . . Plain Lou . . . lover of all that was New 
Hampshire ... A philosopher of the homespun 
variety . . . An intramuralite of slow inspiration and 
fast respiration . . . but remarkable for the way he 
"played the game" . . . Time will make him a Scatter- 
good ... a lovable combination of optimism, sin- 
cerity and good-nature. 




Sodality 3; Football 1; Baseball 1; In- 
tramural Sports 3, 4. 

Prepared at Leicester High School 
Leicester, Mass. 



Arthur James LaPlante 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Pleasant Street 
Rochdale, Mass. 



The lad from Rochdale . . . combines physical and 
mental qualities with considerable success . . . the 
former very evident in baseball ... a star performer 
for Worcester '43's intramural teams . . . one-man 
outfield . . . also plays football and hockey . . . 
Advocate of physical training . . . His pet car a rival 
of Bill Morgan's for looks and efficiency . . . An ac- 
complished "boogie woogie" player ... on the piano 
. . . has his own special style . . . Claims he plays 
the piano just like Paderewski . . . with two hands 
. . . Social lion of some repute . . . patron of school 



dances . . . Leaned to flashy ties . . . blinding really 
. . . His hair the color of corn in October . . . his 
personality among the best . . . another popular 
member of the Worcester caf society . . . Used to 
spend many a noon hour trying to convince skeptics 
that great benefit could be derived from the calisthenics 
classes . . . Helped keep the Worcester Club thriving 
. . . With the big broad smile . . . and the magical, 
musical fingers ... a decided asset to a party . . . 
or to just a gathering of real Crusaders 



Sodality 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Debating l, 2; Purple Patcher 
2, 4, Associate Editor 4; Tomahawk 1, 

2, 3, 4, Editor-in-Chief 3, 4; Aquinas 
Circle 4; Yacht Club 3; Varsity Debat- 
ing 3, 4; Lecture Debating 3, 4; Alpha 
Sigma Nu 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 

3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
French Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Associate 
Editor Le Croise 2, 3. 

Prepared at Campion Preparatory 

School 

Prairie du Chien, Wis. 




William Nicholas Larson, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

800 South Alvord Boulevard 
Evansville, Ind. 



Better known as "Chief," but hates to be called so . . . 
Our Horace Greeley who came East and achieved jour- 
nalistic fame as editor of the Tomahawk . . . ordin- 
arily quiet, but when he had something to say, it 
was said definitely and completely . . . Speaks Spanish 
and French fluently . . . Saw so much of Daly that 
he thought he had two roommates . . . peregrinator of 
note . . . has been abroad on several trips and 
plans to go again, with Uncle Sam footing the 
bill . . . Hasn't had much time at home in the last 



eight years . . . Lent more money than the Bank 
of England . . . phenomenally, he got it all back 
. . . Alpha Sigma Nu . . . had so much to do that 
he had to ration his time . . . B. J. F. . . . Patcher 
. . . Sodality . . . Sanctuary Society . . . Le Croise 
. . . yet was a Dean's Lister for four years . . . and 
still found room for after-hour sessions, spaghetti at 
the Blue Goose, Sunday morning golf, and occasional 
tennis . . . Energetic, dependable, conscientious . . . 
all these spell black-haired, brown-eyed Bill. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; 
Class Vice-President 4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 
3, 4; Worcester Club 1; Secretary 2; 
Vice-President 3, 4; Student Librarian 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Peter's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



John Edward Lavin 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

51 Florence Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



The big little man from Worcester . . . known by 
everyone ... a top-notch dancer . . . has a natural 
rhythm resulting from years of snare-drumming . . . 
knows his orchestras and can pick an off-key in any 
number . . . John was a familiar figure behind the 
library desk ... so faithful to his job that he almost 
got into a fight during freshman year when he caught 
someone sneaking out with a book . . . Loves to eat 
on all occasions . . . especially when studying . . . 
Was in turn secretary, treasurer and vice-president of 



the Worcester Club . . . and vice-president of the 
Senior Class . . . The soul of ambition, he tried to 
get the most out of his time . . . enjoyed company, 
and added to every gathering . . . Calm and depend- 
able ... a lover of English literature . . . could never 
remember the scientific words in biology . . . acquired 
a love for cats as a result of seven weeks of studying 
that species . . . clever, popular, interesting . . . 
John, who will take many steps forward . . . but one 
at a time . . . wisely. 



Sodality 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4; Intramural 
Debating 1, 2 ; Dramatic Society 1, 2, 
3, 4, Vice-President 3; Playshop 1, 2, 
3; Purple 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 4; 
Aquinas Circle 4; History Academy 1, 
2, 3, 4, President 4; Cross and Scroll 1, 

2, 3; Varsity Debating 3, 4; Lecture 
Debating 3. 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 

3, 4; Chairman Class Ring Committee 
3; Purple Key 4; Labor Academy 3, 4; 
Metropolitan Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Chairman 
Purple Key Dance 4. 

Prepared at Brooklyn Prep 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Eugene Thomas Lawless 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

1363 Pinson Place 
Far Rockaway, N. Y. 



Originality-plus, ambition super-plus . . . Gene, with 
a finger in every pie and still enough time to see all 
the good movies in town . . . Gene had ideas . . . big 
ideas . . . and many of them . . . Philosophy, sociol- 
ogy, economics, and politics all entranced this dynamic 
Crusader . . . had more library books than texts on 
his desk . . . could talk intelligently and enthusiastically 
on any subject . . . One of the best orators and de- 
baters in the B. J. F. . . . extemporaneous speeches bore 
all the ear-marks of long preparation and assiduous 
reading . . , talented Thespian . . . the George Halas 
of Wheeler I's football team in junior year . . . Cap- 



tained the ring committee and for six months went 
crazy trying to fulfill orders . . . definitely a "sharp" 
dresser . . . Steady passenger in the Deacon with 
Kev and Paul . . . always on the go . . . could be 
found almost anywhere except in his room . . . Col- 
laborated with Paul McCusker in enterprise after enter- 
prise, business and otherwise . . . ably upheld the 
Brooklyn Prep tradition . . . definitely an "innova- 
tionalist" . . . whose middle name is personality . . . 
Gene will literally push his way to the top . . . you 
can't stop him! 




Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 2 ; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary So- 
ciety 1 ; French Academy 1, 2 ; Labor 
Academy 3, 4; New Hampshire Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. John's Preparatory 

School 

Danvers, Mass. 



John Edward Lawlor 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

20 Lexington Street 
Dover, N. H. 



The Dover boy with the lackadaisical gait and the 
"I'm up to something" smile . . . prepped at St. 
John's . . . there he originated a few absolutely new 
institutional tricks . . . introduced them here . . . 
they were the talk of the Hill in freshman . . . usually 
used Mathias or Packy as a decoy . . . Spent much time 
in trying to "break in" Ed Walsh as a cohort . . . 
Roomed next to "Mouse" in junior . . . as a result 
found most of his free time taken up in unsuccessful 



debates . . . Favorite hobby . . . Greek choral odes 
. . . starred in the Greek Chorus in freshman . . . 
vied with MacDougald for honors on rushes in Kimball 
. . . Never entirely awake before noon . . . said 
he wanted to save his eyes for V-7 ... A New Hamp- 
shire boy with a lot of tricks in the bag ... an 
equanimity worthy of applause . . . and "a way with 
the folks" . . . Put all the happiness he got out of life 
in the treasury of the class and the Cross. 



Sodality 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; German 
Club 1, 2; Riding Club, President 4. 

Prepared at Woburn High School 
Woburn, Mass. 




Owen Joseph Loque, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

65 High Street 
Woburn, Mass. 



Ready to smile . . . perpetually pleasant . . . antics 
on third Beaven brought forth Joe's hearty laugh . . . 
Never without a pipe . . . and seldom without a girl 
. . . Always present at football dances . . . Junior 
Proms . . . and Senior Balls . . . Horseman of note 
. . . the original Holy Cross Crusader . . . dressed 
in armor and riding a white steed, he led the never-to- 
be-forgotten Louisiana Hayride . . . and appeared 
similarly accoutred at several varsity games . . . Bridge 
player of note . . . Numbered Claude Thornhill's 
band among his pet peeves . . . Always ready to go 
and usually setting the pace . . . surprised everybody 



at the Junior Prom . . . Spent many week-ends in 
Woburn for a very pretty reason . . . Famous for 
his neckties . . . Tennis player and golfer . . . Pre- 
med Joe . . . decorated the suite with rabbits' brains 
and cats' skulls . . . and tobacco pouches . . . 
Letter- writer par excellence . . . "This is Kay, calling" 
. . . Liked convertibles . . . and always had one 
. . . Had a rugged beard which he kept under con- 
trol . . . with difficulty . . . Spent all his waking 
hours at Eatonhurst . . . Don't ever dismount, Cru- 
sader. 




Intramural Debating 1, 2; Football 1; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Philhar- 
monic 2, 3, 4; Labor Academy 1, 2, 3, 
4; Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Hebron Academy 
Hebron, Me. 



Edmund B. Loughlin 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

72 Bennett Street 
Wakefield, Mass. 



A fine broth of a lad . . . with a tendency for argu- 
ment of the refined type ... an injury in freshman 
year closed his football book . . . his physique had 
boded ill for opponents . . . Reconciled arts and eco- 
nomics . . . with an unbroken succession of week-ends 
in Wakefield . . . successfully ... a violinist of 
note with the Musical Clubs . . . liked "those concerts" 
... Ed was a proponent of midnight soirees in Beaven 
. . . sponsored by the Fat Men's Club ... a charter 
member . . . Drove a bulldozer during the summer 



. . . earned the title of "highest paid man in the class" 
. . . and the sub-title "Goldie" . . . the biggest waiter 
in Kimball . . . always willing to partake of a few 
appetizers before his "big" meal . . . His crowning 
glory, the Prom week-end in Boston with Courter and 
Quinn ... he maintained that he had had a "quiet) 
time" . . . Possessed the rare faculty of getting things 
done well ahead of schedule . . . without noticeably 
exerting himself . . . affable and laughable . . . 
hearty and sound ... a winner through and through. 



Philharmonic 2, 3, 4; Band 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Mt. St. Charles Academy 
Woonsocket, R. I. 




John F. Loughman 



ACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

5 Walbridge Street 
Allston. Mass. 



Phil was usually wrapped around the big sousaphone 
. . . under Prof. Bouvier's direction he shone in the 
bass section of the band and philharmonic . . . Most 
prized possession ... an electric razor which didn't 
interfere with the corridor radios ... In senior year 
unanimously elected president of the Ancient and Hon- 
orable Order of Lab Rats . . . Once kept a pigeon 
for three days until it could fly again . . . always 
finished before the rest of the class in lab . . . Battalion 
leader in P. T. . . . Worked faithfully for four years 
in the infirmary . . . Got a crew cut at regular inter- 



vals . . . letting his hair grow only during the colder 
months . . . Upheld Boston against any city in the 
country . . . Participated in many heated discussions 
with Joe McGah . . . He and Tom Casey were almost 
stranded "somewhere between New York and Wash- 
ington" on the Musical Club trip in sophomore year 
. . . An authority on army life by virtue of four years' 
experience in the C. M. T. C. . . . Air Raid warden 
for the chemistry department . . . Travelled around 
Worcester frequently with Charlie Polachi . . . Re- 
liable . . . and a gentleman always. 







i-i 

•A «l 

;* i urn 

« * I » 

• i ■ 
« » 3 



Sodality 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Debating 2 ; Aquinas Circle 4 ; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Philharmonic 1, 4; 
Mission Crusade 4; French Academy 4; 
Labor Academy 4; Maine Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at Calais Academy 
Calais, Me. 



Joseph Paul Loverinq 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

11 Lafayette Street 
Calais, Me. 



Steady, dependable, loyal ... a real lover of classical 
education . . . penchant for Homer . . . He coupled 
education with the Spartan ideal of a sound body . . . 
another of the Maine boys ... he possessed the 
characteristic independence born of a sense of true 
values . . . Debater and orator, he easily conveyed his 
point in an argument . . . but his friendly laughter 
took all sting of defeat from his opponents' breast 
. . . Chief sports: baseball and basketball . . . Joe 
has a fine ear for music . . . played violin and piano 



. . . Favored classical masterpieces over modern swing 
. . . Lovering of the ever genial smile could always 
be counted upon to provide the fun . . . Constant 
acolyte . . . truly a Gleason standby ... To know 
Joe was a matter of progressive study . . . for here 
was a man of hidden depths . . . Little Calais' first 
representative at Holy Cross . . . was privileged to 
have had an audience with the beloved Pope Pius XI, 
during a tour of pre-war Europe ... As Maine goes, 
if Joe is a typical son, so should go every man. 



Sodality 1, 4; Intramural Debating 1; 
Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Societv 1, 2; Glee 
Club 1, 2; Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Mt. St. Charles Academy 

Woonsocket. R. I. 




J. Edward Lynch, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

44 Cedarwood Road 
Jamaica Plain. Mass. 



Happy-go-luck)' Ed . . . with never a dull moment 
in his daily routine . . . always managed to deliver the 
Globe, make Mass, study philosophy, and arrive at class 
on time ... A member of the Glee Club for two 
years, he gave his all both on stage and on dance floor 
. . . Sacrificing his musical career for a naval one, 
he was the first member of the V-7 group in his class 
. . . Always supported "causes" . . . especially those 
in the form of dances . . . Learned more about 
Worcester in four years than anyone else in the class 



... a lover of nature, Ed frequently took long walks 
through parks and beauty spots ... A witty conversa- 
tionalist, he could elaborate upon and discuss quite sagely 
any subject . . . Possessor of a distinguishing laugh 
. . . Sometimes called "the man with the build" . . . 
which monicker he modestly and freely interprets as "a 
perfect combination of brains and brawn" . . . jokingly, 
of course . . . Wide-awake and industrious, Ed will 
always make his associates step high to keep up. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Purple Patcher 
4; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3, 4, Sports Editor 
3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; Cross and Scroll 
1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanc- 
tuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Sigma 
Nu 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Brockton Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Boston College High School 
Boston, Mass. 



James Patrick Lynch, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

94 Rockland Street 
Canton, Mass. 



Future John Kieran with a penchant for the philosoph- 
ical . . . Astounding number of A's on his record . . . 
all honors and honor societies succumbed to Jim . . . 
Purveyor of matters athletic for the Tomahawk in his 
capacity as Sports Editor . . . constantly hounding 
some coach or athletic director for the latest news on 
the varsity front . . . the dean of the staff . . . 
Carded a history-making 99 in Sophomore Greek . . . 
even surprised the Dean . . . Had a hand in everything 
in Intramuraland . . . nothing from tennis tourna- 
ments to horseshoe pitching contests escaped him . . . 



Always pessimistic concerning exams . . . perhaps the 
secret of his success . . . Weighted down with medals 
collected from various sources . . . including Alpha 
Sigma Nu and Junior Philosophy . . . Constant par- 
ticipator in all forms of Intramurals . . . Ever-op- 
timistic rooter for all Boston teams . . . Jim had the 
most lackadaisical attitude in the class . . . until there 
was something to be done . . . then a galvanization 
. . . Caught unprepared only once ... in Latin . . . 
Etiam Homer us nut at . . . Extremely popular, Jim will 
have many careers from which to choose. 



Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 1, 2 ; 
Tomahawk 1, 2; History Academy 1; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2; Labor Academy 1, 2; Law- 
rence Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Lawrence High School 
Lawrence, Mass. 




John Joseph Lynch 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

17 Durham Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Jack could frown and smile at the same time ... he 
could run and walk at the same time . . . and he 
could worry you if you didn't know him . . . One of 
the Roger Smith gang, whose every member was a 
modest unpredictable . . . "Slats" was Jack's nick- 
name (a hand-me-down, it was said, from his home 
town of Lawrence) ... A quiet demeanor cloaked 
Jack's bent for buffoonery . . . and fooled his closest 
friends . . . In an enjoyable and unobstrusive way a 
rather devilish prankster . . . there was the time Carl 



Fischer found chicken in his pillow case . . . Enthu- 
siastic controversialist when railroads were the subject 
of discussion . . . plans to follow the profession of 
"Casey Jones" . . . "Slats' " hobbies were for the most 
part musical . . . piano was his specialty . . . 
drums his sideline, although we didn't know it until 
lately . . . roomed with "Sully," the nemesis of all 
inherent in "Slats" . . . Jack is a man who will listen 
and learn . . . and use his storehouse of knowledge 
for a successful future. 




Intramural Debating 2, 3; Aquinas Cir- 
cle '4; Irish Cultural Academy 1, 2; His- 
tory Academy 2, 3 ; Track 2, 3, 4; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-President Hartford 
Club 4. 

Prepared at Middletown High School 
Middletown, Conn. 



Joseph Daniel Lynch 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

30 Stow Avenue 
Middletown, Conn. 



A massive frame and a booming voice . . . just 
plain big . . . always singing and happy . . . pro- 
ficient in all sports . . . intramuralite outstanding, he 
never seemed to tire . . . tops on court or diamond 
. . . varsity footballer until injury stepped in . . . 
Equally capable in his studies . . . one of the brain- 
trusts in the Economics section . . . had the knack 
of learning a thing from merely reading it over . . . 
Expert on current events . . . Joe kept abreast of the 
times by reading countless newspapers, magazines and 
books . . . Loved to argue on any subject . . . would 



sit for hours to thrash out an argument in his rafter- 
shaking voice . . . be it music, politics or philosophy 
. . . Working for a commission in the Marines . . . 
Mysterious concerning his social activities, of which 
there were many ... an avid "mixer," took advantage 
of every out-permission night . . . An authority on 
swing music and a collector of records . . . Definitely 
an optimist ... a dispeller of gloom . . . His only 
worry was his thinning hair . . . Joe . . . whose 
interrogative mind will fit him for the business world. 



History Academy 1, 2; Cross and Scroll 
1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Rhode 
Island Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Classical High School 
Providence, R. I. 




Donald Dalton MacDougald 



ACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

294 New York Avenue 
Providence, R. I. 



Meet a canny Scotsman, rosy-cheeked, with a mis- 
chievous twinkle in his blue eyes ... a distinctive 
walk . . . always seems to be in a hurry ... es- 
pecially in Kimball Hall, where he was a whirling 
dervish ... a purple streak went by with the steaming 
aroma of hot food trailing like a comet . . . and that 
was Mac! . . . And when he sat down himself to 
eat . . . ecce ! . . . Showed the benefits in his ample 
girth . . . and the familiar cry "Hot drink down." 
... A man who knew what he was after and pro- 



ceeded to attain it by studious application . . . defend- 
ed the B.S. in Business Administration Course against 
A.B. in freshman year . . . seen often in the library 
. . . and seen oftener sparring verbally with "The 
Mouse" ... A familiar characteristic jokingly at- 
tributed to the Scotch could never be predicated justly 
of Mac . . . for generosity and unselfishness were 
marked in him . . . Best of luck, Mac, and keep them 
smiling as you have on the Hill. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debat- 
ing 2; History Academy 3, 4; Worces- 
ter Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Classical High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Paul Antoine March 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

5 South Stowell Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



The man of many positions . . . Paul would never 
rest easy until he had won the best of them available 
. . . his jobs ranged from furniture salesman to as- 
sistant accountant in the receiving room . . . Freshman 
year, Paul was poetically inclined . . . used to pen 
sonnets with apologies to Keats or to Kipling . . . 
to the great distress of Mr. MacGillivray, S.J., who 
was seeking originality ... A specialist in French 
. . . was often seen with Doctor O'Hara wrapped in 
the mysteries of the Gallic tongue . . . Tall and slim, 



Paul was graceful on any dance floor . . . and showed 
off his charms on almost every dance floor ... A good 
bowler and a better tennis player . . . Used a slow 
drawl to couple witty sayings and a serious countenance 
. . . An interventionist for the past five years, Paul 
was always at odds with the gang in the caf . . . 
almost lynched once when he said that De Valera 
might have made a mistake . . . Paul's ability to talk 
with authority won't hurt his law career. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; 
History Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom Commit- 
tee 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Mil- 
ford Club 1, 2, Treasurer 2; Worcester 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Framingham High School 
Framingham, Mass. 




Richard Thomas Martell 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

3 De Loss Street 
Framingham, Mass. 



Dick's lanky form was seen flying along many a high 
school's cinder track . . . broke dash records in 
champion form . . . turned that champion form to 
his studies when he came to the Cross . . . left 
plenty of time for extra-curriculars . . . both education- 
al and social . . . Future Navy officer via the V-7 . . . 
not the least bit prejudiced against the Army . . . 
at least, the Army nurses . . . Will always remember 
his first visit to the Wild West with Mitchell, McMahon, 
and McCusker . . . Knew dance bands amazingly well, 
probably because his rhythmic feet had danced to so 



many of them . . . Found time to be a civic figure 
while yet a college student, and his challenging voice 
was often heard at the local town-meetings . . . was 
voted the cutest boy in high school . . . The Boston 
Turnpike found him every morning and evening with 
his thumb extended toward Worcester and Framingham 
respectively . . . with Tom Hobin formed the Mutt 
and Jeff combination of the day-hops . . . With the 
rest of the committee, Dick worked hard to make the 
spring formal the success it was. 




Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 2 ; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary 
Society 1 ; Gardner Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 3, President 4. 

Prepared at Murdock High School 
Winchendon, Mass. 



Joseph Albert Mathieu 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

506 Central Street 
Winchendon, Mass. 



The class' prize combination of sobriety and good 
fellowship . . . Joe was one of the quietest . . . but 
those who knew him realized they had a genuine, and 
very entertaining, friend . . . Not much of a ladies' 
man, Joe compensated by being a man's man . . . 
accomplished the herculean freshman year by single- 
handedly white-washing the conversation at table 88 in 
two weeks, by good example ... an occasional glare 
turned the trick ... A 70's golfer, Joe talked and ate 
pasture pool during fall, spring and summer, dreamed 
of it in winter ... A relatively quiet, but eloquent 



participant in the discussions for the betterment of 
mankind on the west side of Wheeler ... A con- 
stant source of amazement to those who don't know 
what concentrated study means . . . starred in eco- 
nomics and philosophy . . . Devoted much year- 
round thought to Bruins and Red Sox . . . Joined 
the Marines in Junior year and with unconscious 
irony hoped they would make a man of him . . . the 
job's already done . . . clean-cut, studious, sincere, 
Joe, a prince of '43. 



Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 
1, 2; Italian Academy 1, 2; Boston Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Chelsea High School 
Chelsea, Mass. 




Peter Joseph Maurana 



ACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

16 Englewood Avenue 
Chelsea, Mass. 



"Big Pete" . . . education majot . . . especially 
interested in all things mathematical . . . Played varsity 
center at Chelsea for three years . . . All-Scholastic 
in his last year . . . came to the Hill with plenty of 
press notices . . . never saved them . . . less egotism 
than a fourth-string "hamburger" . . . The only dis- 
appointment in his college career ... a knee injury 
. . . preventing him from playing . . . and un- 
doubtedly from receiving Ail-American mention . . . 
Pet peeve . . . the mention of the only pass ever to 
have been completed against him during his football 



career ... in the Temple game, sophomore year 
. . . Dislikes women-drivers immensely . . . Acquired 
his private pilot's license during summer of '41 . . . 
ambition is to be a transport pilot . . . now in Navy 
V-7 . . . planning to transfer to V-5 . . . look out 
for twilight, Land of the Rising Sun! . . . Has sound 
ideas when in a serious mood . . . famed for his 
fundamental psych lecture . . . delivered to Hoiah 
on the various instincts of irrational creatures . . . 
. . . Good luck, Pete . . . Keep 'Em Flying! 







Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Purple Patcher 
4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Worces- 
ter Club 1, 2, 3 4. 

Prepared at Marlboro High School 
Marlboro Mass. 



Robert Edward May 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

7 Highland Street 
Marlboro, Mass. 



"Wittle Robby May" ... the Red Skelton of H. C. 
. . . the blond bombshell from Marlboro . . . 
Favorite pastime: arguing with McQuillan in the caf 
. . . ace doodler . . . could always tell you how many 
more calendar days until the closing of the school year 
. . . Performed the greatest exhibition of butchery 
on a cat seen in the lab in the past decade . . . Ace 
baseball and hockey star . . . devoted his time on the 
Hill to furthering the cause of Worcester '43 in Intra- 
murals . . . runner-up for four years in the Intramural 



bowling championship . . . developed muscles in 
senior year by juggling boxes at the local freight house 
. . . Ran a daily contest with Hobin to find out who 
had more hair on his head . . . Frequented the Totem 
Pole . . . has yet to be convinced that Harry James has 
a top-rate band . . . Keeper of complete and extensive 
notebooks . . . Noted for his million dollar bets . . . 
if paid off would surpass the National Debt . . . 
Graduate of the C. A. A. course . . . destined to fly 
a mighty bomber for Uncle Sam's Navy. 



Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3, 4; Band 2, 3; Fitchburg Club 1, 2. 
3, 4. 

Prepared at Leominster High School 
Leominster, Mass. 




Aldo J. Mazzaf errn 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

53 Eden Glen 
Leominster. Mass. 



Those dark, mysterious eyes belie the real "Mazz" . . . 
Likeable, quiet, industrious, one of the best-known 
"day-hops" . . . Handled his '31 Packard like a 
toy ... he got only eight miles per gallon ... so 
rationing taught him the intricacies of Worcester bus 
travel . . . One of the better accounting students, 
he had a penchant for getting those long problems 
correct . . . due to super-tenacity . . . Liked 
logic; it came natural to his orderly mind . . . Al 



was a very persuasive individual . . . once borrowed a 
dime from a total stranger to get to school on time 
. . . amazed the man by paying him back the next 
day . . . ate tremendously ... in spite of his small 
size . . . Played in the school band . . . Showed 
great interest in the tongue of his fathers . . . His 
conscientious character will make him valuable to 
Uncle Sam . . . another Crusader who won't "miss." 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debat- 
ing 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Purple Patcher Photography Editor 
4 ; Aquinas Circle 4 ; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; 
Mission Crusade 4; Boston Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at Maiden Catholic High 

School 

Maiden, Mass. 



William Hearst McBain 



ACHELOR OF ARTS 

105 Elm Street 
Maiden, Mass. 



Came direct from the mighty metropolis of Maiden 
. . . forceful, honest, calm, Bill served as captain 
for Sophomore D's debating team . . . The steadying 
influence in "Red" Quinn's life ... As Father Keane 
in First Legion, a Simon Legree in Jesuit clothing . . . 
Subject to an interesting Emmanuel Influence, BUI sat 
through many periods with that look in his eye, staring 
at the frontispiece of books sent to him from "Goon 
Castle" . . . Had a savage distaste for loud ties and 
carried scissors for removal of same ... by contrast, 



owned a sport coat that would make even Alsab blush 
. . . Took a keen interest in the German tongue and 
learned to love the language dearly under Herr 
Boursy's tutelage . . . Possessed an unquenchable 
wanderlust and was in his element with a steering wheel 
in his hands . . . Bill rued the day he ever took the 
Photography Editor's job on the Patcher ... it drove 
him beserk but he did a marvelous job . . . Abso- 
lutely dependable, refreshingly candid, against whom 
a disparaging remark was never aimed. 



Intramural Debating 2 ; Dramatic Soci- 
ety 1. 2; Tennis 1, 2 : Mission Crusade 
1, 2, 3, 4; Berkshire Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Searles High School 
Great Barrington, Mass. 




Thomas Coakley McCabe 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

26 Russell Street 
Great Barrington, Mass. 



Terry of the racy set . . . with flashy convertible . . . 
collegiate clothes . . . piles of the latest in records 
. . . Had a marvelous time the week-end of the 
Syracuse game . . . Did a lot of skiing around the 
home town . . . Worked hard at the books . . . 
enjoyed a quiet bridge game now and then . . . His 
room, freshman year, was often the scene of a "jam" 
session consisting of Dubord, Hanrahan and Beecher 
. . . Ted was the best conga dancer on the Hill . . . 
his variation kept the crowd interested at the Spring 
Formal . . . Had a Packard convertible once . . . 



he, Daly and McCann pushed it over the Berkshire 
mountains when the battery gave out one hot day 
. . . Introduced Bill Burke and "Doc" Brennan to the 
sport of kings at a Great Barrington fair . . . Ted's 
favorite hobby was drawing sketches of beautiful 
women . . . the boys always wished they could find 
the inspiration of one of those sketches . . . Big 
worn - in his life was whether or not his hair was 
combed . . . one summer he had it clipped . . . the 
Service won't let him worn- too much about it hereafter. 




Sodality 2 ; Intramural Debating 1, 2 
Purple Patcher Activity Editor 4 
Yacht Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Commodore 4 
History Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 2; Wor- 
cester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. John's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Joseph Henrie McCann 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

69 Coolidge Road 
Worcester, Mass. 



Tall, quiet "Mac" would sit for hours and read silently 
or steal away for a little nap . . . Treated whole 
corridors to ice cream and always took care of special 
birthday parties . . . Became Commodore of one of 
New England's finest intercollegiate yacht clubs . . . 
Never stopped raving about Nova Scotia . . . Couldn't 
get into any athletic contest without becoming a casualty 
. . . Drove a big car that was the flagship for many 
trips to Washington and New York . . . was known 
on girls' campuses over the entire route and tried to 



make believe he didn't love it . . . Had a passion for 
loud neckties . . . Staunch member of the history 
society . . . Spent most of his days with Joe Daly 
. . . most of his nights trying to avoid him so he 
could get some sleep . . . Loved to eat at Jake Wirth's 
. . . Opera fan and lover of good music . . . Enlisted 
in Marine Reserves, expects to be in Quantico soon after 
graduation . . . Generous, polished, honest, Joe 
made a host of friends who know he'll be one of the 
finest on land, in air, on sea. 



Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 2, 3, 4; 
Greater Boston Club, Secretary 1, Treas- 
urer 2, Vice-President 3, President 4. 

Prepared at Belmont High School 
Belmont, Mass. 




John Joseph McCarthy 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

7 Oak Avenue 
Belmont, Mass. 



"]■]■" ■ . ■ the boy from Belmont . . . knower of 
everyone and everything worth knowing . . . Rider 
of a thousand and one horses . . . Came to us toting 
a reputation for being a good Samaritan, a student, a 
linguist and a hockey superman . . . Silent Jack, 
Keeper of the Dogs . . . One of those rare people who 
was willing to help and give at all times ... A 
socialite with the best of them and a dining-hall demon 
. . . Punched his way around the Intramural field 
and in the Discipline office . . . Remember his little 



verse, "Rootin' and Tootin','' etc.? . . . Prayed for 
stomach aches on mornings of important exams . . . 
and never stayed in crowded rooms where the "notes 
were unsociable" . . . His best friend: Alsab . . . 
When he had 90 's he won them . . . the lower marks 
the teachers gave him ... a fine distinction . . . 
boasts that never was pulled the practical joke that he 
wasn't "in" on . . . Jack, future stalwart of the Navy 
. . . How can we forget him? 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4, Prefect 4; B. J. F. 
Assistant Debate Secretary 3 ; Campus 
Host 4; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Dramatic Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Playshop 2, 
3, Director 4; Purple Patcher Liter- 
ary Editor 4; Purple 2, 3, Editor-in- 
Chief 4; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3, Editorial 
Editor 4; Aquinas Circle 4; History 
Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Cross and Scroll 1, 
2, 3, 4, Sergeant-at-arms 2; Varsity De- 
bating 3, 4; Oratorical Contest 1; Cam- 
era Club 1; Alpha Sigma Nu 3, 4; In- 
tramural Sports 1 ; Sanctuary Society 1, 
2, 3, 4; Choir 2; French Academy 1; 
Metropolitan Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Greek 
Play 1; German Academy 1, 2. 

Prepared at Regis High School 
New York, N. Y. 



John Robert McCarthy 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

276 Riverside Drive 
New York, N. Y. 



Literary excellence won him the editorship of the 
Purple . . . devotion to the Sodality carried him to 
the prefecture of that organization . . . Became famed 
for his widespread search for the "intellectual girl" 
. . . His jaunty stride a campus highlight . . . liked 
to do commonplace things, such as hitch-hiking in full- 
dress attire . . . Spent Sunday nights pounding out 
editorials for the "rag" . . . Visited Boston for many 
of the operas . . . An incessant reader . . . Together 
with Marty Conroy, wrote and played in the prize- 
winning one-act comedy, "A Friendly Game of Cards" 



in '41 . . . As a Sophomore, almost tangled with the 
football team . . . Carried with him to the Cross the 
notoriety of being former New York director of the 
Deanna Durbin Devotees . . . Vaughn Paul's success 
almost overwhelmed him . . . John wielded racket 
and softball bat with equal gusto . . . Owner of 
Wheeler Vs "miniature library" . . . Evinced a pref- 
erence for flowery shirts and the more drastic combin- 
ations . . . Devotee of Scholastic philosophy . . . 
John's ability to combine pen and Cross will put him 
in the first rank of our Catholic writers of the future. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; 
History Academy 3, 4; Baseball 1; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; French Acad- 
emy 1; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 4. 

Prepared at St. Peter's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 




Robert Vincent McCarthy 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

39 Gates Street 

Worcester, Mass. 



A good-natured, capable Irishman whom you can't 
help but like . . . balanced blend of Irish wit and 
Irish wisdom . . . scholar, athlete, gentleman . . . 
man of many friends and talents . . . chief protagonist 
of the cafeteria debating society ... his argument 
ad hominem overwhelmed . . . held a corner on caf 
humor . . . senior partner of McCarthy and Price 
Consolidated, Masters of Mischief . . . seldom defeated 
. . . never conquered . . . One of the finest athletes 
of the intramural league . . . twirled for a year on our 
freshman nine . . . captain and star of all Worcester 



'43's ball teams . . . his fast ball is feared all over the 
Hill . . . serious student and hard worker . . . 
headed for a teaching career . . . often seen toiling 
away many a long afternoon in the library . . . argues 
philosophy every noon hour . . . quotes Shakespeare 
frequently . . . often complains of how he wore him- 
self out in F. X.'s freshman Latin class . . . Favorite 
haunt — the Greek's . . . slips to Hampton Beach for 
an occasional week-end . . . Symbolic of Crusader 
spirit and Holy Cross ... a sincere and loyal friend 
who will hold the Purple high. 




Sodality 3, 4; Labor Academy 4; Fitch- 
burg Club 1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 
2. 

Prepared at St. Bernard High School 
Fitchburg, Mass. 



Walter David McCarthy, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

56 Forest Street 
Fitchburg, Mass. 



The gentleman from Fitchburg . . . the reserved red- 
head . . . Mr. Esquire's well-dressed college man . . . 
calm . . . capable . . . collected . . . Silent pass- 
enger of the Fitchburg Flying Fortress . . . Conscien- 
tious objector to all debates, public and private ... A 
champion of classicism, Dave conquered with ease the 
poets of Rome . . . had an allusion from the bards 
for every occasion . . . His most startling characteristic 
. . . a tendency towards amazing impulses . . . 
which contradict his usually conservative character . . . 
Took pleasure in doing his work well . . . Dave was 
never known to cram for an exam . . . Liked his 



music on the heavy side . . . one of our genuine 
concert fans . . . Liked his movies too . . . always 
managed to get in one a week . . . He has yet to 
settle a four-year argument with the faculty over 
his first name ... he doesn't like to be called Walter 
. . . Proudest possessions . . . his statistical memory 
and his new figure . . . the latter a product of the 
Muscle Classes ... A Sociology major, he got his 
theory in the classroom, his practice analyzing his own 
amazing impulses . . . Social work gets a capable 
recruit in conscientious, conservative, classicist Dave. 



Intramural Debating 1, 2; Scientific So- 
ciety 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; Irish Cul- 
tural Academy 1 ; History Academy 1, 
2; Cross and Scroll 1, 2; Baseball 1; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior 
Prom Committee 3 ; Boston Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; German Academy 1, 2. 

Prepared at Boston Public Latin School 
Boston, Mass. 




Kevin John McCarty 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

79 Park Street 
West Roxbury, Mass. 



One-man chamber of commerce for Boston in general 
and for Boston Latin in particular . . . his oft-repeated 
slogans "Athens of America" and "universal centre of 
culture" performed the double duty of enraging New 
Yorkers and charming Bostonians . . . Played any 
sport superlatively . . . but baseball was his first love 
. . . Jack Barry liked his pitching in freshman year 
. . . Kev liked the prospect of an M.D. more . . . 
his greatest achievement in intramural pitching was the 
no-hitter against Wheeler I for the league lead last June 



. . . Strong as a couple of oxen . . . wrestled his 
way through freshman year . . .it's doubtful whether 
such victims as Bud Hedges will ever recover from 
those scissors . . . Kev had a phenomenal memory 
. . . made good use of it in classes and gab-fests 
alike . . . added to this memory remarkable powers of 
concentration, and used the combination to keep himself 
in Section A . . . right at the top for four years . . . 
No need of wishing him good luck . . . men like 
Kev make their own luck. 




Sodality 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4, Treasurer 
4; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Toma- 
hawk 4, Business Manager; Aquinas 
Circle 4; History Academy 4; Cross and 
Scroll 1, 2; Varsity Debating 4; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Soci- 
ety 1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 2; La- 
bor Academy 4; Niagara Frontier Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 1, 2. 

Prepared at St. Mary's High School 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. 



Paul Donald McCusker 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

649 Jefferson Avenue 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. 



Super-salesman of '43, Paul came to the Hill with 
several spelling-bee prizes in his trunk, including the 
National Boys' . . . Spent his last two years in the 
constant company of Gene Lawless . . . they split 
their time evenly . . . half was spent making plans for 
diffusing Catholic Action . . . the other half discuss- 
ing the best ways of earning money . . . quick! 
. . . Possessed remarkable powers of resilience . . . 
went from one affaire du coeur to another and never 
profited by sad experience . . . Reportedly the fastest 
typist in the class, his ability stood him in good stead 



. . . Will probably end up as a promoter . . . Paul 
could make a bullfight in the Porter's Lodge pay div- 
idends . . . Became business mogul of the Tomahawk 
and grew familiar with the manager's office of every 
Worcester establishment . . . Considered movies and 
bridge as favorite forms of relaxation . . . was fre- 
quently seen enjoying the latter with Roomie Jim Stan- 
ard and other Wheeler I devotees . . . Carried his 
energy to the "playing fields of Holy Cross" and did 
his best at all times . . . Paul, energetic, intelligent, 
industrious . . . but never too busy for a good time. 



Sodality 1 ; Aquinas Circle 4 ; History 
Academy 1 ; Cross and Scroll 1, 2 ; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary So- 
ciety 1, 2; French Academy 1, 2; Maine 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 1. 

Prepared at Cheverus High School 
Portland, Me. 




Leonard J. M a c D o w e 1 1 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

29 Surrenden Street 
Portland, Me. 



Smiling and effervescent . . . never angry at anyone or 
anything in four years . . . had a liking for teachers 
who gave out few assignments ... at home on the 
football field, the baseball diamond, basketball court 
and even the handball court . . . Strong Red Sox 
rooter . . . ready to visit Fenway Park or Braves Field 
at a moment's notice . . . regular member of the Sat- 
urday afternoon club in Wheeler . . . Rabid fan of the 
track team . . . more specifically of his successive 
roomies Bob McGlone and Fran Kelley . . . Developed 
into a terrific slugger in intramural baseball in senior 



year . . . Ted Williams of the league . . . Restless 
character who was always looking for something to 
do . . . never obtained sufficient sleep to satisfy himself 
despite all the afternoon naps . . . Made a foray into 
the unknown world on return from vacation in soph- 
omore year ... A remarkably pleasant disposition 
. . . had a smile for everyone . . . believed in periods 
of relaxation, especially week-ends . . . Staunch movie 
fan . . . Master of jest, who took them as well as 
he gave them out . . . one of our best friends. 




B. J. F. 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 
1, 2, 3, 4; Chicago Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Fenwick High School 
Oak Park, 111. 



Joseph Patrick McGah 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

1125 North Linden Avenue 
Oak Park, 111. 



Has yet to meet the teacher who can pronounce his 
name correctly ... it always takes- at least three tries 
. . . Joe loved to argue about any subject, but favored 
the Jesuits and Boston College . . . Owner of a high- 
pitched laugh . . . Did his bit to immortalize the '41 
B. C. week-end and thereby garnered the famous 
"Embraceable Joe" tag . . . disappeared completely 
for twenty-four hours in Syracuse, and took quite a 
riding as a result . . . Always seemed to be reading a 
newspaper . . . which explains his amazing knowledge 
of current events . . . Joe could and would quote 



scores of football games played years ago . . . usually 
a spectator at intramural events, but specialized as a 
softball hurler . . . Sported the shortest haircut in 
history in freshman year . . . but it grew back some- 
how . . . Famous for his "comments," Joe only gave 
them upon request . . . they were usually well worth 
waiting for ... A consistent student, Joe got an A 
in his Junior Oral, and was always on or near the 
Dean's List . . . The legal profession will appreciate 
Joe . . . who can talk his way through a brick wall. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3; History Academy 1, 2; 
Tennis 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4: 
Worcester Club 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Marlboro High School 
Marlboro, Mass. 




It ii iii! i I Thomas McGee 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

5 Pleasant Street 
Marlboro, Mass. 



Led a double life through four years of college . . . 
attended most classes at H. C. . . . all social functions 
at Regis . . . looked as if he were going to night school 
there . . . Sandy-haired, hard-working pre-med stu- 
dent . . . Bob day-hopped for sophomore and junior 
. . . then decided he would like the boarder atmos- 
phere again during his senior year . . . occupied 
exactly the same seat in the caf every morning after 
breakfast . . . found that a good time to brush up on 
his philosophy, his knowledge of which edified Father 



Moran . . . the caf saw him at lunchtime, too . . . be- 
tween mouthfuls of the Blue Plate Special, he told the 
"Framingham Travelers" that a good time was had by 
all the previous evening . . . Marlboro member of the 
Worcester Club . . . Biology lab time found Bob 
vitally interested in studying which way muscles run 
and how many bones there are in the little toe of a cat 
. . . he'll make a good doctor in the army medical 
corps or elsewhere. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Tomahawk 2; 
Aquinas Circle 4 ; Cross and Scroll 1 ; 
Basketball 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Mission Crusade 2, 3, 4, First Assistant 
4 ; French Academy 1 ; Niagara Frontier 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Greek Play 1. 

Prepared at Canisius High School 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



Cornelius V. McGillicuddy 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

235 Chester Street 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



The "Buffalo kid" . . . our ambulatory encyclopedia 
of things athletic whose trade-mark was a transcending 
smile . . . An ubiquitous Dean's lister and a varsity 
basketeer for three seasons . . . One May day in senior 
year he took Tom Alberghini for a ride on an eccentric 
Beaven elevator . . . just to prove that "bodies, when 
left unsupported, fall" . . . Rainy Saturdays saw him 
in Jim Lynch' s room waxing poetic over the charms 
of Buffalo or reeling off stories about ball players of 
every generation . . . Connie impersonated with al- 
most professional dexterity . . . Equally proficient in 



soothing losing pitchers and explaining "the matter" 
to a less-informed classmate . . . Untemptable with 
book in hand but invaluable during off-hours . . . 
it was then that his Irish wit shone . . . e.g. "My May 
Talk" . . . Took a stab at almost every subject from 
Demosthenes to trigonometry and truly mastered each 
. . . Argued philosophically . . . and proved statis- 
tically . . . "It's an absolute fact" was his constant 
reminder to would-be skeptics . . . There are two 
Connie Mack's, and they're related at that, but for us 
there's only one. 



Cross and Scroll 1; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Labor Academy 2, 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 4; Waterbury Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec- 
retary 2, Vice-President 3, President 4; 
Connecticut Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Crosby High School 
Waterbury, Conn. 




Francis John McGrath 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

322 Robbins Street 
Waterbury, Conn. 



Meet the youngest of the McGrath contingent . . . the 
one who did all the worrying for the three . . . saw 
to it that the brotherly trio was always an harmonious 
unit . . . took his studies seriously . . . everything else 
in his stride . . . Chose the business field for his 
future . . . neat and well-poised in appearance . . . 
shy, pleasing smile . . . light, curly hair . . . One of 
the "three" most prominent members of the Water- 
bury combine . . . with Father Dowling as moderator 
. . . and the far corner of the caf as a meeting place 
. . . You could find the congenial group gathered 



there almost every Saturday evening . . . Capable 
President of the Labor Academy . . . one of the speedy 
gargons in Kimball . . . looked forward with enthu- 
siasm to vacations at home . . . Waterbury had more 
of a lure for Frank than did the fair city of seven 
hills . . . Seen often at the "K. K." where young 
Connecticut college folk used to dwell ... his spirit 
of brotherhood within his own family has made us 
happy to receive him into the permanent bonds of our 
big family ... the class of '43. 




Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 

2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; La- 
bor Academy 3, 4; Waterbury Club 1, 2, 

3, 4, Vice-President 4; Connecticut Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4. 

Prepared at Crosby High School 
Waterbury, Conn. 



James Joseph McG rath 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

322 Robbins Street 
Waterbury, Conn. 



One-third of that confusing trio ... A Crosby High 
grad from Waterbury . . . Will be one of the 
"Soldiers of the Sea" after graduation . . . solid of 
structure, he'll be a good Marine . . . Not completely 
happy without a newspaper . . . sports page enthu- 
siast . . . walking almanac of sports lore of every type 
. . . Faithful to the last . . . Eleanor Dee's the 
name . . . Knew how to dress . . . always impeccable 
. . . Quieter than average . . . but argumentative 
to the last . . . mostly in the realm of sports . . . 
Frequent Mass-goer . . . respected for his integrity 



. . . His brothers and he were real pals . . . Some-, 
how that's rare ... In years to come: "Did you know 
Jim?" . . . "Sure; a good egg" . . . Describes him 
nicely . . . Much attached to movies . . . never 
missed the good ones . . . True to his nature, what 
he had to say was usually worth while hearing . . . 
because he "put his oar in" only when he had some- 
thing to say . . . Will be remembered for having been 
part of the "Trinity" . . . but even more for what he 
was . . . serious and intelligent. 



Intramural Debating 1, 2 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Labor Academy 2, 3, 
4; Connecticut Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Hartford 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Ellsworth High School 
Windsor Locks, Conn. 







Michael W. McGrath 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

16 Church Street, 
Windsor Locks, Conn. 



We all know him as easy-going Mike . . . never upset 
about anything . . .just seems to plod along . . . 
taking things as they come . . . Not related to the 
McGrath trio . . . but he himself has a brother in 
sophomore and another entered in the fall . . . Says 
he worked as a laborer last summer but it's hard to 
picture him in that capacity . . . Mike's books rarely 
balance due to his excessive generosity to friends in 
need . . . Strong booster of all things related to 



Connecticut and an authority on tobacco farming . . . 
knows his movie actors and actresses . . . seldom did 
a show come to town that he failed to see . . . Likes 
aviation and haunts the huge army airfield in his town, 
keeping us informed of the relative merits of the P-39's 
and P-40's . . . Has been a member of the B.S. Eco- 
nomics group these four years . . . Mike hopes he'll 
rate a commission in some branch of the service . . . 
He'll make the ideal officer for privates. 




Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission 
Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Labor Academy 2, 3; 
Waterbury Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Connecticut 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4. 

Prepared at Crosby High School 
Waterbury, Conn. 



Thomas E. McGrath 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

322 Robbins Street, 
Waterbury, Conn. 



One of three brothers ... all in the senior class 
. . . Tom and Jim are twins . . . Frank's thrown in 
for good measure . . . confusion reigns ... an easy 
way to distinguish . . . Tom is the one who, for some 
odd reason, would sit and listen to "Marie" all day . . . 
we repeat: for some odd reason . . . well set up . . . 
football and track in high school . . . dropped sports 
for the books in college . . . where he set out to master 
the Business course . . . and all the intricacies of 
taxation . . . thinking of future March 15ths, no 



doubt . . . one of Fr. Dowling's bosom buddies . . . 
Likes to out-think the heroes of "rational" detective 
stories . . . and insists on the "rational" . . . creates 
an impression of sincerity . . . confirms the impression 
in his actions . . . quiet . . . generous . . . free 
and easy . . . the sort of man who will take things 
in stride . . . it's a comprehensive stride . . . and 
a regular one ... it can easily cover distances . . . 
or a bright career. 



Intramural Debating 2 ; Tomahawk 2, 3, 
4, City Editor 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; French Academy 1, 2; Gardner 
Club 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Gardner High School 
Gardner, Mass. 




Robert P. M c K e o g h , Jr 



ACHELOR OF ARTS 

121 Lawrence Street 
Gardner, Mass. 



Bob . . . the hard-working pre-medic from Gardner 
. . . conscientious student with his eye on a definite 
goal ... A very capable man . . . spent many a 
long afternoon in the labs . . . will be well rewarded 
for it . . . Made himself right at home in many a 
midnight session . . . Quite a prankster in his spare 
time . . . delighted in setting waste baskets on fire 
. . . frequently seen heading for the golf course 
. . . played a better than average game . . . also 
played a good fast game of tennis . . . Athletically 



inclined but not to extremes ... all play and no work 
makes Bob a dull boy . . . One of the men trying 
to talk the Red Sox into the pennant . . . great Bruins 
fan . . . forever lauding the Berkshire hills and es- 
pecially the home town . . . Seen frequently in the 
company of Logue and O'Brien . . . capable member 
of the Tomahawk staff — in the role of city editor . . . 
behind it all a driving determination for the medical 
profession . . . may his years in that profession be as 
happy and successful as his years with us. 




Intramural Debating 2 ; Aquinas Circle 
4, Secretary; Football 1, 2, 3; Track 1, 

2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; Mission 
Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Hartford Club 1, 2, 

3, 4. 



Prepared at Hartford Public High 
School 



Hartford, Conn. 



William Peter McKnne 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

379 Zion Street 
Hartford, Conn. 



Tall, lean, athletic . . . Bill earned a track and football 
reputation at the Cross ... a hard worker and a con- 
sistent winner under Bart Sullivan in dash and relay 
. . . An unsung hero of the gridiron . . . reported 
faithfully for practice . . . felt the bumps and bruises 
of the gruelling scrimmage but, without complaint, 
missed the glory of Saturday's cheers ... A conscien- 
tious student, Bill's name often appeared on the Dean's 
List . . . thoroughly enjoyed his studies . . . loved 
to tell of amusing class-room incidents . . . clever 



thumb-nail artist . . . witty and friendly-eyed . . . 
Could give as well as take in the frequent "sessions" 
. . . Wore a familiar green sport coat on campus . . . 
walked with casual grace . . . kept himself in top 
physical shape . . . used to lead the boys on Beaven II 
in setting-up exercises . . . ate a dozen times a day 
. . . Read meters for the Hartford utility company dur- 
ing the summer . . . stepped out now and then . . . 
Moderate, sensible, a good sport in every sense of the 
word ... a well-loved member of '43. 



Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1; Ni- 
agara Frontier Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 4. 

Prepared at St. Mary's High School 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. 




William James McMahon, Jr 



ACHELOR OF ARTS 

515 3rd Street 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. 



Bill came to us from Niagara . . . before he knew 
it he had more friends than his home town has honey- 
moons . . . prominent in intramural sports . . . 
excelled especially in basketball ... a baseball player 
of big league caliber ... In junior year, joined the 
ranks of the lab-loving pre-meds . . . "Handsome 
Will" had a nickname for everybody, and nobody ever 
took offense . . . Reason — he claimed he could never 
remember names unless he was the bestower thereof 
. . . Proved himself the perfect host when some of 



the boys went touring through New York State during 
summer vacation sophomore year — witnesses: Jack Mit- 
chell and Dick Martell . . . from all reports, they were 
treated like kings in their own palaces . . . Willy al- 
ways enjoyed a good time, and his motto was "the more 
the merrier" . . . Friendly and carefree in his outlook, 
he always devoted more time to the books than was 
required . . . With the advent of the war Bill became 
a first aider for air-raid emergencies . . . Hail to the 
"happy Doc." 




Purple Patcher 4; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3, 4; Class Ring Committee 3; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; French Acad- 
emy 1, 2; Haverhill Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Tilton Academy 
Tilton, N. H. 



Adrian C. McNamara 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

78 Hamilton Avenue 
Haverhill, Mass. 



"Big Red" . . . displayed mens sana in corpore sano 
. . . used his broad-shouldered athletic frame to good 
advantage on the barrel staves in the snowy hills of 
North Conway . . . has the medals to prove it . . . 
Balanced his sports with the pre-med course . . . was 
often heard to say as he left lab, "Well, the rest of the 
day is ours — the moon won't be out for ten minutes" 
... . Looks forward with enthusiasm to medical school 
and practice . . . Summers found him keeping the 
vacationists at Hampton Beach healthy with the gro- 



ceries of the A & P . . . and keeping himself healthy 
on Hampton's sandy shore amid the laughter of pleasant 
companions . . . laughter caused, no doubt, by dis- 
plays of Red's Irish humor . . . seemed to have a pen- 
chant for traveling . . . "had a time" in such diverse 
locales as North Conway, New York, and Bridgewater 
. . . Only a miracle prevented his bleached bones from 
being found on the roadside on the Bridgewater trip, 
for the expedition was undertaken with capital of $1.50 
. . . How far is Mattapan from Roslindale, Mac ? 



Football 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Clinton High School 
Clinton, Mass. 




Edmund Leo McIVamara 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

228 Main Street 
Clinton, Mass. 



"Big Ed" from Clinton . . . tall . . . dark . . . 
athletic . . . three years a member of the varsity foot- 
ball squad . . . end in Sophomore year . . . tackle 
in junior ... in high school, Ed was fullback . . . 
add it all up and you have a one-man football team 
. . . Two days before the Mississippi game in his 
junior year, he was an end . . . the day before the 
game a tackle was needed ... Ed was given the job 
. . . learned the plays in one day . . . Day of the 
game he started . . . never stopped . . . "Ole Miss" 



knew that he was raw ... so play after play they 
whacked at him . . . but he never gave up . . . they 
did! . . . Since then he has never faltered, even though 
he has been bothered by injuries . . . Majored in ed- 
ucation . . . aspires to be a coach . . . for the past 
few winters has been acquiring experience handling 
fellows by refereeing basketball games . . . Quiet and 
soft-spoken . . . the lad who had classes in caf . . . 
according to Bart Sullivan . . . May you hit the future 
hard and low, Ed. 




Intramural Debating 2 ; Purple Patch- 
er 4; Scientific Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Aqui- 
nas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 
4; Philharmonic 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Metropolitan Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Mattituck High School 
Mattituck Long Island, N. Y. 



Charles Joseph McNulty 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
Laurel, Long Island, N. Y. 



Charlie, the chemist . . . soft-spoken and friendly 
Islander from the land of Laurel . . . diligent worker, 
putting in long hours of lab work every afternoon . . . 
Found time, however, to get down to band rehearsals 
. . . connoisseur of both classical and swing music 
... so rare as a day in June . . . easy-going . . . 
never worried about getting up in the morning . . . 
Member of the Scientific Society ... a "bug" on 
baseball . . . Supreme moment of happiness came when 
he was accepted into the Philharmonic . . . Lost him- 
self for three days during the N. Y. U. week-end . . . 



generally called "Mac" . . . raconteur par excellence, 
teller of tales of all sorts, especially those about his 
beach parties . . . Charmed many with his debating 
technique and is considered among the elite of the Met 
Club . . . sample debate introduction: "Now this is 
one of the many ways in which New York excels New 
England" . . . lab limited his afternoons but "Mac" 
unlimited his nights and week-ends . . . Could be 
found in all "grouping" sessions . . . New Yorkers 
come and go, but there aren't very many like Charlie. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debat- 
ing 2 ; History Academy 3 ; Intramural 
Sports 2, 4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at North High School 
Worcester, Mass. 




Robert Paul McQueen ey 



ACHELOR OF ARTS 

8 Longmeadow Avenue 
Worcester, Mass. 



The ideal combination of brain and brawn ... at 
studies ... at intramural sports . . . or at helping 
a corporation keep track of its assets . . . Infallible 
master of the worksheet, the balance sheet, and the p. 
and 1. statement . . . will make all C.P.A.'s look to 
their laurels after his sojourn with the Marines . . . 
Is looking forward to becoming a jiujitsu adept in 
the latter branch of service . . . if he devotes to that 
subject the concentration he expended on others Bob 
won't be a shavetail long . . . An active participant 
in cafeteria debates ; always began with conclusive prem- 



ises and followed up with a devastating attack of dis- 
cursive reasoning which brooked no further argument 
. . . Proud of his official connections, Bob has al- 
ready signalized the Marines far and wide as the saviors 
of freedom, democracy, and of course the army and 
navy . . . his tag-line: "Without the Marines, the 
country is lost. With the Marines, the Axis is lost" 
. . . Worked hard summers, but still found time to 
make New Hampshire conscious of his presence . . . 
member often of the "beach patrol" ... . Bob will 
keep the situation well in hand. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debat- 
ing 2; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Hudson High School 
Hudson, Mass. 



Jeremiah Edward McQuillan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

7 O'Neil Street 
Hudson, Mass. 



Blonde and robust . . . that's Jerry . . . one-man 
political mob from Hudson . . . winner of numerous 
caf arguments ... a logician and debater all the way 
... he could explain why the Yanks keep winning 
. . . Easy to pick out . . . with his greeting . . . 
used the time at his disposal to good advantage . . . 
systematic and resourceful . . . consistently received 
high marks as an Ec. major . . . Supreme among 
eaters of hamburgers, french fries and coke ... al- 
ways on the look-out for a good spaghetti dinner . . . 



A member of the mixed day-hop contingent at the two 
corner tables in the caf . . . it was there that Jerry 
started the discussions . . . and then left them raging 
... it was there he tried to reform Haskell with 
Barone's help . . . Knew a lot of boarders . . . and 
all the Worcesterites . . . busied himself mentally 
and physically with the affairs of each . . . There's 
sure to be a comfortable niche in the future for a man 
with as many adjectives at his command as Jerry. 



Class President 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2; 
Track 1, 2; Intramural Sports 3, 4; Pur- 
ple Key 4; Outing Club 3, 4; Haverhill 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. James High School 
Haverhill, Mass. 




Vincent Jerome McSweeney 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

5 Columbia Park 
Haverhill, Mass. 



Gentleman, the President of the senior class . . . 
Vin of the laughing eyes and the Irish smile . . . 
quiet and witty . . . Promising freshman football and 
track star . . . laid aside the helmet and spikes for 
the test tube and scalpel . . . Tall, dark, and hand- 
some . . . the proverbial answer to a maiden's prayer 
. . . and yet a man's man . . . knew everybody there 
was to know . . . Teamed with McNamara on many 
a "ride" . . . punched Framingham to a frazzle in 
McCarthy's car . . . traveled the New Hampshire 
hills on a pair of skis . . . starved Bridgewater during 



exam week freshman year . . . Looked exceedingly 
pious in Jesuit garb . . . much to the disappointment 
of a female admirer ... in return gave the culprit a 
few jumpy moments . . . President for four years 
. . . Baseball . . . football . . . track . . . golf . . . 
hockey . . . rabid sports fan and talented intramuralite 
. . . Add to this a touch of Irish wit, a firm determin- 
ation and capabilities for becoming a doctor and there 
you have our President . . . Success is awaiting you, 
Vin ... go get it; and may your happiness be like 
your golf score ... a hundredfold. 




Sodality 4 ; Intramural Debating 2 ; Sci- 
entific Society 4 ; Aquinas Circle 4, Pub- 
iclity Manager; Cross and Scroll 4; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Cru- 
sade 4; Rhode Island Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
German Academy 1, 2, Vice-President 
1, 2. 

Prepared at Providence Country Day 

School 

East Providence, R. I. 



Robert Wayne McVay 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

56 Maynard Street 
Pawtucket, R. I. 



Consistent, hard-working student . . . knows good 
clothes and displays fine taste in his dress . . . scholar 
perfecto; but not to be surpassed in the gayer life of 
dancing and swing . . . ample repertoire of whimsical 
sayings . . . One of the original Alumni "dormitorites" 
. . . did his bit to keep Pepper Martin guessing . . . 
Acted as private tutor to Bro Kilbane freshman year 
. . . managed to join the Gillon-Emery league in junior 
. . . From Pawtucket, R. I., and proud of it . . . Bob 
and the Duke rode high at the turfs . . . Spent most 



of his time in Massachusetts, summering on the shores 
of old Cape Cod, where he was postmaster . . . Dis- 
played a singular combination of the cultural and the 
scientific mind . . . manifested his executive ability 
in the Deutsche Verein, serving as vice-president under 
the immortal Brantl . . . much occupied with feminine 
correspondence ranging from Regis to Rosemont . . . 
H. C.'s contribution to Tufts Med ... a future doctor 
from a family of doctors . . . There is no warmer 
heart in the class of '43. 



Dramatic Society 1 ; Purple Patcher 
4, Circulation Manager; Aquinas Circle 
4; Intramural Sports 4; Purple Key 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 3; Al- 
bany Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Glens Falls High School 
Glens Falls, N. Y. 




Thomas Edward Meath. Jr 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

168 Ridge Street 
Glens Falls, N. Y. 



The man responsible for your receiving a copy of the 
p urple Patcher — our circulation manager . . . tall, 
easy-going, smiling ... A fine mind plus arduous ap- 
plication gave him marks that we all envied . . . 
never too busy to be a friend in need, whether it was 
an idea or coin of the realm to be borrowed . . . Genial 
Tom was aroused only when his somewhat precarious 
hairline was verbally assailed . . . Social element in 
his life wasn't neglected . . . whether it be Glens 
Falls, Boston, Worcester, or New York ... a famous 
trip to the big town in junior year earned him the not- 



very-much-appreciated title of "The Grand Old Man 
of the Gay White Way" . . . Ever-generous with time 
and Chesterfields . . . example of Mr. Esquire himself 
... at all times faultlessly dressed . . . possessor of 
a sport coat which occasioned much debate . . . Con- 
noisseur of note on many subjects, including feminine 
beauty, food, and the faculty . . . Always threatening 
to disrupt Albany Club proceedings . . . Life at H. C. 
held just one grievance for Tom — "Why isn't this 
place co-ed?" 




Irish Cultural Academy 2 ; Intramural 
Sports 2, 3, 4; Labor Academy 3; Con- 
necticut Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Basil's Preparatory 

School 

Glenbrook, Conn. 



Thomas Peter Meehan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

118 Forest Street 
Stamford, Conn. 



Came to us in Sophomore year . . . didn't take him 
long to get acquainted . . . made friends easily . . . 
knew his "way around" . . . soon discovered the better 
places downtown . . . often visited Becker . . . 
Round-faced, red-cheeked, well-proportioned ... a 
good-looking fellow . . . Friendly and energetic . . . 
vitality plus . . . Entered into school activities with 
vigor . . . golf, tennis and intramural enthusiast . . . 
steady patron of the recreation hall . . . Never missed 
a party . . . or a week-end of importance . . . Put 



his "cherry" sedan to good use during the N. Y. U. 
week-end Sophomore year . . . happy host at the G. A. 
... a thrilled spectator at the Syracuse game in Junior 
. . . New York, Boston or Worcester, Tom enjoyed 
himself . . . Worked with as much vim as he played 
. . . Member of the Labor Academy . . . Determined, 
self-assured, ambitious . . . always a witty something 
on the tip of his tongue . . . the blushing boy from 
Stamford has what it takes . . . definitely an asset 
to '43. 



Aquinas Circle 4; Golf 1, 2, 3, 4; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2; Purple Key 4; Metropol- 
itan Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Iona Preparatory School 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 




Joseph W. Mendes 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

24 Glen Eagles Drive 
Larchmont, N. Y. 



Tee one up for the broad-shouldered, easy-going Adonis 
from Larchmont . . . God's gift to the women and 
the country clubs ... To Joe, the Discipline office 
was "out of bounds" . . . and the Dean's office "in 
the rough," but usually he managed to stay right on the 
"fairway" . . . Frequently called "Hank" . . . for 
reasons blurred with age . . . Golf was his specialty, 
but only few can surpass his snagging of the pigskin 
. . . Nemesis of champion roommate Bill Burke on 
the handball courts . . . Joe has also been known to 



do a bit of swimming in the Charles in the wee hours 
of the morning . . . Amiable and talented member of 
the "Off to Boston" group . . . Connoisseur of latest 
gentlemen's clothing . . . Originator of "Dear Pop, 
due to lack of sufficient funds" . . . One of the first 
in the class to be accepted in V-7, Joe has the stuff that 
means promotion . . . With a gallant future in Navy, 
golf and business, the embodiment of fortiter, fide liter 
et feliciter. 




Sodality 2 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Dra- 
matic Society 1 ; Tomahawk 1, 2 ; Ora- 
torical Contest 1 ; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3 ; Glee 
Club 3, 4; Berkshire Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 2, Vice-President 3; Greek 
Play 1. 

Prepared at Pittsfield High School 
Pittsfield, Mass. 



George Harrison Merritt 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

52 Springside Avenue 
Pittsfield, Mass. 



Hailing from the heart of the Berkshires . . . "Bud" 
will extol their merits as long as there are ears to 
listen . . . fiend to the golf craze that swept Beaven 
. . . took up the game seriously and conscientiously 
. . . even to the point of practicing in his room . . . 
Likes all sports . . . one of the steadier correspondents 
on the Hill . . . has been heard to gripe on receiving 
only two letters in the morning mail . . . His tuba-like 
trachea put "Bud" in the Bass section of the Glee Club 
. . . one of Prof. Bouvier's best . . . still blushes when 



someone mentions the trip to Gardner . . . Though 
serious on the surface, his sense of humor and easy 
smile are in evidence wherever he goes ... his room 
was the center of activity for the Beaven I "Fraternity" 
. . . not one to spurn Beaven's scholarly "sessions," 
George still found time to do a little grinding on the 
side . . . frequently on the Dean's List . . . George's 
level headedness and all-round ability make him good 
officer material ... we feel sure that in any capacity, 
"Bud" will show his "merit." 



Baseball 1, 2, 3; Track 3; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3. 

Prepared at Bridgton Academy 
Bridgton, Me. 







Emmanuel A . Merullo 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

49 Byron Street 
East Boston, Mass. 



If Emmanuel can't, who can? ... A lad who does 
better than the next fellow with less effott . . . Came 
from East Boston via Bridgeton Academy . . . Jack 
Barry's regular shortstop in second year . . . "jitters" 
benched him much of third year . . . not a distant 
hitter, "Manny" had his share of hits . . . most of 
them when most needed . . . Brother Lennie is reg- 
ular short stop for the Chicago Cubs . . . "Manny" 
worships him . . . when Lennie fails to hit or makes 
an error, "Manny" does all the worrying . . . Always 



the centre of activity and cause of most of the hilarity 
... At his best on the long baseball trips . . . Got 
used to dashes to Room 216 for the never-ending 
bridge marathon . . . Thinks well of Worcester . . . 
there are reasons therefor . . . Knew all his classmates 
. . . and the intimacies he formed were lifetime ones 
. . . remarkably well-informed on matters athletic and 
on many others . . . Jack Barry and 200-odd Cru- 
saders will remember "Manny" long . . . for good 
sportsmanship and good fellowship. 




B. J. F. 3; Intramural Debating 2; 
Aquinas Circle 4; Metropolitan Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at A. B. Davis High School 
Mount Vernon, N. Y. 



Kenneth A. Milner 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

76 Vernon Place 
Mount Vernon, N. Y. 



Our own George Washington . . . from Mount Ver- 
non . . . New York, however . . . Faithful . . . 
modest . . . affable ... a true Crusader . . . kept 
making more and more friendships ... A good 
listener . . . participated in many an economic and 
philosophical discussion . . . argued with Howie at 
table over Megalopolis . . . couldn't understand where 
"Mr. Berle" put all the spaghetti .... lent a patient 
ear to the mad scientists on the Hill . . . Could ab- 
sorb more knowledge from 12 'til 1 A.M. than the 
average student absorbed from 7 to 11 P.M. . . . Firm 



advocate of a plentiful supply of rest and fresh air 
. . . marked by his ever-present genial smile . . . 
readily on hand to guarantee Gleason's awakening for 
early Mass in junior year . . . they invariably met in 
the washroom . . . one preparing for a long day 
. . . the other for a short night . . . Shook the 
moth balls out of his golf bag in the Spring . . . 
it never gathered dust from want of use . . . Helped 
to make this year's Mission Crusade reach an unusual 
high . . . Spirit of good-fellowship . . . second 
to none. 



Intramural Debating 1, 2; Irish Cul- 
tural Academy 1, 2; History Academy 
1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 1, 2; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Labor Academy 2, 3, 
4; Fall River Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Coyle High School 
Taunton Mass. 







Daniel Joseph Moran 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

708 Robeson Street 
Fall River, Mass. 



Agility, utility, ability, and Moe . . . words of a feather 
. . . the Donald Budge of Holy Cross for four years 
. . . Came and conquered all who dared to test his 
tennis powers . . . His flaming hair, matched with the 
current object of his taste for clothes, made him a 
gentleman from a clothes ad come to life . . . Due 
to his ingenious scheming, had the largest wardrobe in 
the school . . . Danny boy . . . ran unmolested on 
the intramural gridiron and matched his skill with the 
best in handball ... a golfer in his own right ... a 



Sodality man and an intramural debater . . . Cast 
his pearls of knowledge to us through the T omahaivk 
. . . and the Irish Cultural Academy . . . Famous 
member of the "King of Sports" group, and rightly 
so . . . Tedious worker in J. J.'s dog kennel . . . 
known hereabouts for his kindness to dogs and his 
ability to teach them to do tricks . . . Eat, drink 
and be merry, Moe, for tomorrow you shall be an 
Ensign in Uncle Sam's Navy . . . success should come 
your way . . . it's the Crusader's way. 




Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; French Academy 2; Labor Acad- 
emy 2; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Cape 
Cod Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Cambridge Latin School 
Cambridge, Mass. 



George Bernard Moran, Jr 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

1011 Pleasant Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



An infallible record-book of matters athletic . . . 
with emphasis on Holy Cross sports history . . . Bud 
could talk for hours . . . and frequently did . . . 
about track records or H. C. immortals . . . Claimed 
that he civilized Dan Doyle . . . and coined the 
word "appleknocker" just for Dan's benefit . . . The 
Jimmy Dolan of Holy Cross, he served as spotter at 
the football games for Al Heifer . . . and occasionally 
aired "intelligent post-game comments" . . . or so 
Bud called them . . . Was always conservatively well- 
dressed . . . with the ever-present cigar . . . The 
Freshman representative of the "racy" crowd . . . An 



inveterate football week-ender . . . who never missed 
a game away from home ... or the accompanying 
festivities . . . Between periods Bud could be found 
in Ed Walsh's or Joe Murphy's room . . . Soft- 
spoken . . . with a certain amount of reserve . . . 
Remembered little things . . . and had pet names for 
many of his professors . . . Summered on the Cape 
. . . One of the youngsters of the class . . . whose 
dry wit broke up many an argument . . . And don't 
worry, Bud . . . the meals in Kimball weren't really 
as bad as we said they were. 



Sodality 1 2, 3; Aquinas Circle 4; Base- 
ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 
4; Mission Circle 1, 2, 3, 4; Worcester 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Hudson High School 
Hudson, Mass. 







William J. Marqa 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

52 Florence Street 
Hudson, Mass. 



n 



Puzzling to us at first because of near-identical brother, 
Ed of '42 . . . tall, blonde, athletic . . . played foot- 
ball, baseball, hockey . . . catcher on the Varsity 
squad . . . had a knack of helping a pitcher loosen 
up . . . always the hustler . . . Majored in Education 
. . . received good training for his profession by 
helping out his classmates . . . consistent . . . liked 
to engage in school activities . . . His car a pet hobby 
. . . always kept it shining . . . many a day-hop 
owes his prompt attendance at first-period classes to 



Bill . . . gas rationing cramped his style, however 
. . . One of the "sharpies" of the class ... a good- 
looker and a smart dresser . . . unusual in that he knew 
many more boarders than the majority of day-hops 
. . . loved to sit in the caf . . . at a "special table" 
during the noon-hour . . . much talk and many laughs 
... a great hand at rallies and such . . . dances and 
and other social events too . . . personality Bill . . . 
a fine athlete, a well-rounded gentleman, a nice person 
to know. 




Football 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 1 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 
4; Glee Club 4; North Shore Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at Winthrop High School 
Winthrop, Mass. 



Kevin Burke Mulcahy 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

26 Enfield Road 

Winthrop, Mass. 



"Mul," the speedy left fielder from Winthrop . . . 
whose powerful hitting was a great factor towards the 
later success of the Crusader nine last year . . . All he 
needed was a chance to show his ability . . . for when 
Captain Nahigian was graduated, Kev stepped in and 
did even better . . . batted over .400 . . . fielded like 
Terry Moore . . . Perhaps the best-all-around athlete 
at the Cross . . . played magnificently at left half on 
the football team and also starred in basketball . . . 
Reached his football peak at the mud-soaked Colgate 
game Junior year . . . but baseball is Kev's first love 



. . . Frequently seen at the Pakachoag golf course 
challenging anyone . . . admits modestly that golf 
is not his game . . . Kev owns and pilots his own boat 
during the summer . . . has had much experience on 
the sea . . . even sailed to Florida once . . . His real 
ambition, to play big league ball . . . Outstanding 
in his studies . . . with a retentive memory that kept 
amazing everyone . . . All-around Kev ... If you 
want to know how a game should be played, just ask 
him. 



Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2. 3, 4; Mission Crusade 1, 2. 3. 4; 
Metropolitan Club 1, 2. 3. 4. President 
4. 

Prepared at Chaminade High School 
Mineola. L. I. 




Arthur John Murphy 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

84-42 Chapin Parkway 
Jamaica, L. I. 



Two big-town accents . . . two blonde heads . . . 
Rocco and Murph were around ... we could always 
tell certain days on the Hill by Murph ... if you 
looked twice at a sharply-dressed individual, and if it 
turned out to be Art, then it was an out-permission 
night ... A trunk-piling, baggage-smasher in fresh- 
man year along with the two T. J.'s and Dewey . . . 
wrestler of no mean ability . . . smoked Father Martin's 
cigars regularly . . . was dumped out of bed early one 
morning in Alumni . . . three hours later, he was 



still sleeping on the floor, position unchanged . . . 
Seemed to have had all the senior professors for some 
subject in freshman or sophomore year . . . they never 
failed to ask him first-year religion questions ... re- 
cruited another Murphy to join the Lido outing club 
to replace the loss of Marty . . . husk) 7 stalwart on the 
intramural football field . . . Proved to us that he 
wasn't overweight when he passed the Marine physical 
exam . . . will train for a commission after graduation. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Debating 1, 2; Aquinas Circle 4; 
Varsity Debating 3, 4; French Academy 
1, 2, 3, 4; Holyoke Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Michael's High School 
Northampton, Mass. 



David Collins Murphy 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

81 Bates Street 
Northampton, Mass. 



"D. C. G." . . . raven hair, deep voice, quiet manner 
. . . Dave's booming bass was familiar to all fre- 
quenters of Leonard Hall ... it was as a debater that 
he first saw the sidewalks of New York in freshman 
year with Conroy and McCarthy ... as lecture debate 
secretary carried on futile correspondence with parish 
clubs for months . . . finally got results . . . Dave 
was very inoffensive-looking in class, but threw wasp- 
like retorts at the "prof" on occasion . . . witness the 
"mediam Minervam" sally with Fr. Dwyer in soph- 
omore year . . . Marvelled in Fr. Brennan's Amer- 



ican Literature . . . Dave's notes were a reference 
source for half the class . . . decided to investigate 
Ellen Glasgow's "vein of iron" . . . disciple of Eddie 
Gilmore . . . emerged as a social butterfly under the 
latter' s tutelage . . . known as the acrobatic acolyte 
after sprawling over the floor of Community Chapel 
with a missal on top of him . . . Had minor vices 
. . . would promise Whelan to report for softball 
practice . . . then fail to appear . . . verily, a David 
to tangle with life's Goliaths. 



Sodality 1 ; Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 
4: Track 1. 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3. 



Prepared at Seton Hall Preparatory 

School 

South Orange, X. J. 




Edmund Dennis Murphy, Jr 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

12 Chippewa Street 
Lowell, Mass. 



Captain Ed . . . leader of the Purple gridiron warriors 
. . . he keynoted their success by his own brilliant 
play ... a "dream" end . . . fast, tireless, pass- 
snatcher in his own right, with the head and heart of a 
true football player ... Ed scorched the cinders with 
Bart Sullivan's track team during the off-season . . . 
Often considered a great pitcher . . . but that was the 
other Ed Murphy . . . Roomed with "Pappy" Roberts, 
another first-rate end, until Walt left for the Air Corps 
. . . "Murph" signed up with the Marine Corps Re- 
serve . . . Enjoyed frequent trips home to Lowell 



. . . never tired of praising it . . . An Irishman 
through and through ... in name, appearance, and 
disposition ... Ed knew the songs and stories for the 
right occasions, and was not averse to listen to new 
ones . . . Made numerous friendships, and kept them 
the right way ... by doing his share . . . Thought 
not at all of personal safety as he rushed into the thick 
of battle ... A true leader with his mind on his 
job and his eyes to the future . . . the Marines are 
lucky. 




Intramural Debating 2; Baseball 1, 2, 3; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. 

Prepared at Williamsburg High School 
Williamsburg, Mass. 



Edward Joseph Murphy 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

23 South Main Street 
Haydenville, Mass. 



Quiet and handsome "Murph" . . . the "slim Hayden- 
ville hurler" . . . according to the sportswriters . . . 
on Jack Barry's great baseball teams . . . Steadiness and 
a beautiful curve his chief assets . . . Lost one game 
in two years of pitching ... to Yale, 3-2 . . . Re- 
lieved Ernie Ford against the Red Sox and set "Terrific 
Ted" and all the rest right back on their heels . . . 
Loves the game of baseball . . . would pitch forever 
if he had his way . . . Considerate . . . appreciated 
suggestions from teammates and fans alike . . . Slow- 
moving, almost to the point of laziness . . . endowed 



with limitless endurance . . . Roomed with Joe 
Potenza . . . thus got the catcher's viewpoint . . . 
"Murph" was district marble champ years ago in 
Springfield . . . Played intramural basketball for the 
champion Campion team . . . thrilled the throng with 
his long set shots . . . Sincere . . . more mature than 
most of his fellows . . . and extremely reliable as a 
friend . . . just as reliable in his studies . . . "Murph" 
has set many a young girl's heart throbbing . . . but 
claims he's true ... to his mother . . . We know he 
isn't kidding. 



Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 
4; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Peter's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 




Francis James Murphy 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

501 Cambridge Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



The boy with the build . . . short, husky, good-natured 
. . . "Turk" didn't like to be rushed . . . lived within 
a stone's throw of Kimball, but found the 8:30 class 
difficult to make . . . ardent Intramuralite . . . blocks 
on Freshman Field . . . set-shots in the gym . . . 
Softball or baseball pitcher . . . moderation was his 
keyword . . . both in play and in work . . . after 
three years, admitted his favorite expression "I ain't 
squealing" had no significance . . . C. M. T. C. train- 



ing made Frank a platoon commander for physical train- 
ing . . . the benefits of which he reaped during the 
week and tossed away over week-ends . . . helped pick 
the Queen of the Christmas Ball . . . plans to become 
a Marine officer ... his men will probably like him 
enough to let him lead the attack . . . and he'll do it, 
too . . . smiling all the time . . . because that's the 
kind of fellow he is . . . tough, but nice ... if you 
don't like "Murph," there's something wrong with you. 




Aquinas Circle 4; Golf 2, 3, 4, Captain 
4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission 
Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Central New York 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4. 

Prepared at La Salle Academy 
Providence, R. I. 



George Lawrence Murphy, Jr 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

307 Hartford Place 
Utica, N. Y. 



"Laughin' Larry," mainstay of the golf team for three 
years ... in Sophomore year he returned from a week- 
end with a new title — New England Intercollegiate Golf 
Champion . . . the cup was almost as big as he was 
. . . practiced indoors and outdoors at every opportun- 
ity .. . always happy to help others with their game 
. . . Great admirer of Sammy Snead . . . opened up 
the new Utica golf course at the end of Sophomore 
year by an exhibition match with Gene Sarazen . . . 
A frequent visitor to Boston . . . Larry looked for- 
ward eagerly to long week-ends and golf matches . . . 



Well versed in matters pertaining to any sport . . . 
avid reader of newspaper columns . . . Always chuck- 
ling and happy, even if he himself were being ribbed 
... A swing addict, Larry liked to predict what new 
songs would become hits . . . Had friends everywhere 
and was popular with all . . . Worked hard for a 
commission in the Navy . . . Impeccably dressed at 
all times and an authority on what to wear ... A 
wide grin ... a curly thatch of blond hair ... re- 
sourceful in the classroom, in the ballroom, on the 
fairways. 



Scientific Society 3, 4, Treasurer 4. 

Prepared at Coyle High School 
Taunton, Mass. 




Joseph li n ni| h Murphy 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

23 Cedar Street 
Taunton, Mass. 



The corridor diagnostician . . . never wearied of talk- 
ing about fatal diseases, and how easy it is to catch 
them . . . Used to kid George Brand in the well- 
remembered room on second Carlin . . . Seemed to 
be always going to or coming from lab . . . Well- 
poised on a date . . . The first word in Joe's vocab- 
ulary was always "Why?" . . . his mind couldn't 
help but probe . . . Told jokes with a curious intensity 
and a quick laugh . . . Treasurer of the Scientific 
Society, expert on the medical application of the 
electron-microscope and lover of philosophical wrangles 



. . . Contributed his shirt to the Charlie O'Rourke 
dummy which dangled from an Alumni window before 
a B.- C. game . . . Startled Father Glavin once with 
one of the most preposterous objections ever raised in 
cosmology . . . Likes to drive a Packard, but doesn't 
always miss the trees ... A handy man with a rifle, 
he was our modern minute-man . . . Well-read in 
scientific texts and a devotee of science fiction . . . 
An operation-watcher of long standing was Joe . . . 
should go far with a scalpel. 




,% 



4(^Htev 




B. J. F. 3, 4; Intramural Debating 1, 2 
Purple Patcher 4; Tomahawk 1 
Aquinas Circle 4; Cross and Scroll 4 
Varsity Debating 3, 4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Chicago Club 1, 2, 3, 
4. 

Prepared at Fenwick High School 
Oak Park, 111. 



Joseph Patrick Murphy, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

505 North Elmwood Avenue 
Oak Park, 111. 



Joe . . . the quiet lad from the Midwest . . . soft- 
spoken and reserved . . . witty and light-hearted . . . 
Definitely a man's man . . . star intramuralite for 
four years in each and every sport . . . true sportsman 
and a true gentleman . . . with a love for things 
athletic . . . Knew his baseball to a decimal point 
. . . could name the home town of every big leaguer 
. . . Definitely prejudiced in favor of the Cubs and 
Blackhawks . . . the home-town teams . . . Talented 
debater . . . one of the unsung heroes of the B. J. F. 
. . . also a star freshman and sophomore debater . . . 



Moved to the library so the groupers could group in 
his room . . . Supplied the corridor with two daily 
papers and enough stamps for everyone ... In return 
was nicknamed "Pete" . . . Definitely averse to his 
roommate's Eastern twang . . . even now "Pete" claims 
it's a "horse" and not a "hoss" . . . Spent his Christmas 
vacation on the Florida shores . . . his summer on the 
shores of Lake Michigan . . . One of our friends we 
shall never forget . . . student . . . athlete . . . 
gentleman . . . The Cross can well be proud of him. 



Sodality 1; History Academy 3, 4; In- 
tramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Berkshire Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Drury High School 
North Adams, Mass. 




James Francis IV a n 1 e 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

127 Pleasant Street, 
North Adams, Mass. 



Far and away the most easy-going member of '43 
. . . nothing ever got him ruffled . . . everything 
amused him . . . The fellow whose eyes danced with 
sunshine even when he was serious . . . Tall and 
good-looking . . . commanded attention wherever he 
went . . . possessor of one of the most powerful 
physiques in the school . . . but to see him, you 
wouldn't think he could win a squabble with a stiff 
breeze . . . due to his shambling walk . . . The 
story's told that one or two misjudged Jim completely 



in this regard . . . Tabbed, together with roomie, "Mo" 
McMahon, as the easiest twosome in the class to know 
. . . Formed the direct antithesis to "Mo," who could 
play basketball all day long . . . Jim liked sleep much 
better ... A fellow who got real joy out of living 
. . . and out of being with his friends . . . that's 
what made him so well-liked . . . Didn't take much 
argument to get Jim to leave the books and have a 
good time . . but didn't neglect the texts too often 
. . . Happy-go-lucky Jim . . . friend of all. 




Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; French Acad- 
emy 1, 2; Connecticut Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Ansonia High School 
Ansonia, Conn. 



Andrew Natnwich 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Silver Hill 
Ansonia, Conn. 



"Handy Andy" . . . triple-threat, rated with the better 
backs the nation over . . . loved football and played 
it best 'when the chips were down' and the going 
toughest . . . for what he lacked in size he made up 
in courage . . . his kicking against Colgate and his 
running against B. C. as a Soph will long be remember- 
ed after "34" is hung up . . . The injury in the final 
minutes of the Syracuse game was disastrous ... a 
later mishap proved more disheartening . . . Made 
numerous trips to Hartford on "official business" . . . 
always came back a better and a happier man . . . 



had a wonderful "business partner" . . . Played 
Varsity baseball for Jack Barry until his gridiron mis- 
hap . . . performed well as an intramuralite with the 
champion Campion quintet along with the "Horse" 
and "Pappy" ... a natural athlete ... a nature lov- 
ing "Nutmegger" . . . Gave the books the best he 
had and won over them handily ... so shall he do in 
whatever he undertakes . . . Keep playing the game 
Andy . . . you'll never fall short of that last pay-off 
stripe. 



Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 3, 
4; Outing Club 3, 4; Labor Academy 3, 
4; Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Monsignor Coyle High 

School 

Taunton, Mass. 




William Fieldon Naylor, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

33 Dennis Street 
Attleboro, Mass. 



A new-comer to the ranks in junior year . . . trans- 
ferred from our arch-rival, B. C. . . .his former 
associations did not prevent him from cheering for his 
new alma mater at the memorable battle in Fenway Park 
. . . Was taught the Holy Cross songs in a royal man- 
ner the night of his arrival on Mt. St. James . . . 
Ardent believer in physical culture . . . ready to accept 
all challenges for duels in strength . . . made one bet 
with Kev McCarty once too often . . . was a little 
the worse for his experience . . . Regular participator 



in all intramural sports . . . Made an unsuccessful 
venture into the business world with the cleaning con- 
cession . . . finally gave it up . . . Ran into trouble 
the week-end of the B. C. game in junior . . . Was 
highly pleased when he received an unexpected gift of 
several books from an admirer . . . unfortunately, 
circumstances forced him to return them . . . Suffered 
quite a ribbing over his hitting ability in baseball . . . 
In the short space of time he has been here Bill has 
become a real fixture, a true Holy Cross man. 




Intramural Debating 1, 2; Aquinas Cir- 
cle 4 ; Cross and Scroll 2 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1; 
Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Metropol- 
itan Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Brooklyn Preparatory School 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Thomas H. Neaqle 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

84 Cypress Street 
Floral Park, L. I. 



Our husky friend from Floral Park, L. I. . . .a clean 
living fellow . . . finds time for a friendly game of 
football every now and then . . . Pet peeve: classical 
study . . . His idea of time well spent: a long con- 
ference with one of his prefects . . . Lover of life 
in general . . . plays a good game of tennis . . . 
participates in all active sports ... no more loyal 
rooter for the Brooklyn Dodgers on Mt. St. James 
. . . just extol the virtues of the St. Louis Cardinals 
. . . Tom is off on a rampage . . . Avid reader of 
the sport page and Dorothy Dix . . . has been 



burning up the phones ever since he met a certain 
young lady from Worcester in sophomore year . . . 
Definitely on the serious side . . . Really hit his 
stride in junior year . . . became the general con- 
sultant on all matters economical ... a mathematical 
and business mentality . . . Gave his time to philos- 
ophy also . . . will long be remembered for his 
excellent lecture to the Aquinas Circle . . . Army En- 
listed Reservist . . . sturdy, strong, and willing . . . 
A good product of the education he has received. 



Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Hartford Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Cheshire Academy 
Cheshire, Conn. 




Thomas J. j\[ e I i q o n 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

120 Liberty Street 
Meriden, Conn. 



Tom or Chuck . . . wash-room warbler . . . awarded 
Dixie cup and title of "The shower crooner" . . . 
sharp chiaroscuro when Tom strolled across campus 
with roomie, Tomas' . . . laughed more with each 
other than any other roommates on the Hill . . . 
though Tom could do more "chin-ups" . . . with 
his powerful chest (of which he was not ashamed) as 
a result . . . provided most of the literature for 
Frankie's customers . . . could look mighty serious 
when he wrinkled his forehead and lifted that right 



eyebrow . . . carried the seriousness into the class- 
room, with steady application to the books . . . chief 
hope: a good job in Meriden . . . with practical 
experience as time-keeper for Kimball workers . . . 
better than "Sal Hepatica" for that logy, down-in-the- 
dumps feeling . . . would not back out in any "dis- 
cussions" ... in the caf and his room . . . Tom's 
always ready to lend an ear to the other fellows' 
troubles . . . with the result that he won't have many 
himself. 




Aquinas Circle 4; Tennis 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Soci- 
ety 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; Boston Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; German Academy 2, 3- 

Prepared at Boston College High School 
Boston, Mass. 



Frederick William O'Brien, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

465 Beacon Street 
Boston, Mass. 



Stately and proud Beacon Street sent us Freddie . . . 
turned out to be the self-styled "mighty mite" . . . 
mighty on the tennis courts and the fairway ... en- 
thusiastic (before December 8) for Der Deutsche 
Verein and other things German . . . except German 
measles . . . which he contracted the eve of the Spring 
Formal . . . showed he had chosen his profession 
well, when he diagnosed correctly his "Pink Plague" 
. . . would like some day to see "M.D." after his name 
. . . promoted "Punchy's" affaires de coeur . . . Once 



called "the boy with the dreamy eyes" 
. . . but his dreaminess ended there 



. and he was 
. loved music 

ardently . . . surprised everyone, including himself, 
when he purchased (fully) a record-player on the in- 
stallment plan ... he kept it busy . . . also kept the 
fairer sex supplied with correspondence . . . was two- 
way . . . Together with the other O'Brien felt the 
blow of tire rationing ... his weightier side shown in 
his pre-med schedule ... he followed it successfully 
. . . because he's deadly serious about that. 



Sodality 1; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 
1; Chicago Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Western 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Spanish Academy 1. 

Prepared at Fenwick High School 
Oak Park, 111. 










James Donnell DBrie 



n 



ACHELOR OF ARTS 

37 Washington Boulevard 
Oak Park, 111. 



Jim was always in pitching . . . whether it was base- 
balls, footballs, snowballs, or Father Brennan's English 
course . . . intramural luminary in all sports . . . 
with one consuming ambition ... to win a charm 
. . . almost made it with the Wheeler I footballers 
. . . Had an anthology of tales about friends who 
were football greats . . . and a list of injuries that 
would stagger a veteran . . . Pitched freshman ball 
and later made an intramural record that turned Jack 
Barry you know what with envy . . . Wore out six 
recordings of Day In, Day Out in freshman, when he 



referred to it as "our song" . . . sang with the Glee 
Club . . . and was seen frequently in Boston, Bridge- 
port, New Haven and New York . . . fair enough 
for a mid-Westerner . . . Jim thought seriously of 
going into the tire and rubber business, but found the 
stakes were much too high . . . Almost tried out Fen- 
wick's fire ladder one night when he thought he was 
trapped by flames ... a little rubbing alcohol had 
done the trick . . . called Speed, Punchy, and Navy 
... a nice person to know under any name. 




Intramural Debating 1, 2 ; Aquinas Cir- 
cle 4 ; Irish Cultural Academy 2 ; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Knights of Co- 
lumbus 2; Choir 2, 3; Labor Academy 
3, 4; Connecticut Club 1, 2, 3, 4; New 
Haven Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Spanish Academy 
1, 2. 

Prepared at New Haven High School 
New Haven, Conn. 



John James D Connor 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

180 Yale Avenue 
New Haven, Conn. 



"Oke" . . . "Oakie" . . . tall, broad-shouldered 
frame and curly red hair marked him in any crowd 
. . . despite the color of his hair, a most easy-going 
man . . . never fretted or worried . . . Roomed with 
fellow "city-zen" Smitty right through the years . . . 
typical New Haven wit ... it enlivened nights in 
Kimball . . . Beachcombed the Connecticut shore in 
the summer time . . . found Indian Neck an ideal 
spot . . . 'twas there that New Haven's best sororities 
were located . . . Never averse to a party . . . 
whether in New Haven or Worcester . . . there was 



the B. C. week-end in junior year . . . Fr. Reed never 
could understand how "Oakie" got to Natick and then 
wound up in Boston . . . Handled himself well on 
the intramural field . . . "Oke's" only physical tragedy 
on the Hill ... a severely scorched epidermis . . . 
the result of an expedition to Coes Pond in the hot 
spring session of '42 . . . Mourned the departure of 
Cullum and Jim Dooley for the armed services . . . 
Heckled Scavullo in class . . . "Oakie" . . . like 
"My Gal Sal" ... an all-'round good fellow. 



Aquinas Circle 4; Irish Cultural Acad- 
emy 2 ; Intramural Sports 1 ; Sanctuary 
Society 1 ; Labor Academy 4 ; Mission 
Crusade 4; French Academy 1, 2, 3; 
Springfield Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Le Croise 
1, 2, 3, Circulation Manager 3. 

Prepared at Cathedral High School 
Springfield, Mass. 




John C. II II it n ii i' I I 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

52 Craiwell Avenue 
Springfield, Mass. 



John often had a worried look on his face . . . and 
a rumpled mop of hair ... a sure sign that an exam 
was in the offing ... an A.B. Honors man . . . 
burned more than his share of midnight oil . . . easy- 
going . . . reticent . . . with a shy Irish smile . . . 
Poet Laureate of Section B in freshman year ... a 
skeptical Scholastic at times . . . John loved to argue 
on matters philosophic . . . heavy beard ... a math 
shark . . . disciple of Gus Sonnenberg . . . Arthur 
Murray taught him dancing in a hurry . . . when he 



and Foley tripped the light fantastic . . . unofficial 
champ of the Morse Code class ... an infrequent 
visitor to Freshman field . . . made his presence felt 
tho' via vicious blocking . . . associated with Le Croise 
. . . and an active member of the French Academy 
. . . had a habit of asking pointed questions in class 
. . . received a few pointed answers as a result . . . 
V-7 Ensign in Uncle Sam's Navy . . . don't shoot 
'til you're spoken to . . . and we know that you'll 
succeed. 




Sodality 1, 3, 4, First Assistant Prefect 
4; Intramural Debating 1, 2; History 
Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; French 
Academy 1, 2, 3. 

Prepared at Mooers High School 
Mooers, N. Y. 



John £. D'Hara 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Mooers, N. Y. 



Literally a man of the campus . , . John was only 
seen down-town when catching or leaving a train . . . 
quiet and shy . . . always seemed to be hurrying 
somewhere ... a hard worker . . . liked to relax 
on the tennis courts . . . covered the court like a 
professional . . . faithful member of the Sodality 
. . . Took an active part in History Academy functions 
. . . history medal winner, junior year . . . terrific 
altercation when the Worcester Draft Boards claimed 
him as a Worcesterite . . . Familiar figure in the 
Library . . . traversed the steps at precisely the same 
time every evening . . . 10:30 found him in his room 



writing letters . . . these were well expended efforts 
. . . perhaps the reason for those regular letters from 
Mooers, N. Y. . . . tooted a saxophone in the football 
band . . . frequent rally performer as guitarist for 
Mouse's "Concord Corn Cobblers" . . . Many who 
know his reserved nature would have been surprised 
if they had traced the unearthly screams emanating from 
third Beaven junior year . . . wants to be a history 
teacher . . . hopes to do graduate work at Columbia 
some day ... a conscientious, sincere person, John 
will make a good prof. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3; Intra- 
mural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic Society 
3; Track 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 
4 ; French Academy 1 ; Labor Academy 
3; Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Boston Latin School 
Boston, Mass. 




Adrian Paul DLeary 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

518 East Broadway 
Boston, Mass. 



Ade, from the south side of Boston . . . and proud 
of it too . . . combined a sturdy ability to take it with 
his good-natured Irish humor . . . one time air-raid 
warden . . . merely condoned his roommate's vital 
activities . . . caught up on his sleep Saturday after- 
noons . . . resting for a wild round of social dancing 
at ye Carroll Club . . . Natural habit of leaving doors 
open ... a rapid-fire novel reader, holding records 
for all books . . . Recipient of numerous and varied 
nicknames . . . small of stature . . . big of heart 
. . . ability in track questionable . . . target of many 



a crack and dig . . . leading orator in Public Speaking 
class with the unforgettable discourse on the banana 
man . . . Man of short cuts in work . . . pencil al- 
ways in hand while reading for the purpose of under- 
lining . . . spoke handily in Religion class . . . cut 
a neat figure on the basketball court . . . could even 
get ahead on the outside reading assignments . . . 
blossomed forth in bow-ties for a brief period . . . 
pipes always brightly polished . . . devised a system- 
atized system . . . Political instinct of South Boston 
apparent ... a good thing in a small package. 




Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Ohio Club 1, 
2, 3; Western Club 1, 2, 3. 

Prepared at La Salle Military Academy 
Oakdale, Long Island, N. Y. 



Michael G. Weil 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

1290 West Exchange Street 
Akron, O. 



The last for a while of that long line of O'Neils at 
Holy Cross . . . has made as deep an impression as 
any of them . . . many nicknames, prefers "Smooth" 
... a definite big time operator . . . had a different 
car every time you turned around . . . flies his own 
plane . . . came down in Syracuse once . . . had to 
leave the crate there . . . took special delight in 
diving over the school when the boys are trying to sleep 
. . . ran the Beaven radio station from "Foo Flat $:1" 
. . . studies hard and is majoring in Physics . . . wore 
a coat in first year until it literally fell right off him 



. . . Had the Freshman prefects baffled with his in- 
genious radio switch . . . nearly drove Fr. Shortell 
crazy with the record "Dolores" . . . Spent vacations 
in New York, Akron or Florida . . . Distance meant 
nothing to "Smooth" . . . loved pranks, practical 
jokes and all general fun-making . . . crawled the 
Fenwick ledge with great agility . . . loathed con- 
vention . . . instructor in the Air Corps . . . you'll 
make your mark on the world, Mike, just as you have 
on Holy Cross. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 
1 ; Purple Patcher 4 ; History Acad- 
emy 2, 3, 4, President 4; Intramural 
Sports 2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 2, 3; 
French Academy 1, 2; Worcester Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at North High School 
Worcester, Mass. 




William Callistus ' IV e i 1 , Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

274 Lincoln Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



We almost lost "Bill" on those windy mornings in 
back of Kimball . . . but he hung on and the class 
of '43 gained a popular and able student . . . cul- 
tivated an easy-going manner . . . saw to it that he 
was never caught with his preparation at half-mast 
. . . his short serious appearance belied his subtle 
wit . . . rocked many a class with his quickies . . . 
rolled off Lincoln Heights each morning alone . . . 
wound up on Middle River Road with a full load and 
McQueeney worrying about the gas . . . debater . . . 



held to immovable opinions . . . once got a 100 
from Fr. Hutchinson in Philosophy . . . contributed 
his talent to the library staff in between visits down- 
town for "swing" records . . . never bought any . . . 
just listened . . . interested in foreign affairs . . . 
thought Regis a pretty place too . . . so he joined 
the History Society . . . was chosen head of the day 
students' branch of the society, senior year . . . These 
four years were easy for Bill . . . and we think the 
future will be easy for him too. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Debating 2 ; Aquinas Circle 4 ; 
History Academy 2, 3,4; Varsity De- 
bating 3, 4; Lecture Debating 3, 4; 
Class Vice-President 2 ; Alpha Sigma 
Nu 3, 4; Ring Committee 3; Mission 
Crusade 1 2, 3, 4; Senior Collector 4; 
Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Radio Debate 
Manager 4. 

Prepared at Clinton High School 
Clinton Mass. 



John James D Toole, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

467 Main Street 
Clinton, Mass. 



Spent more time at school than most of the boarders 
. . . and knew everyone in the class . . . loved to 
read . . . had a vast fund of knowledge on current 
events . . . was known to attend extra classes just 
for the sake of learning . . . won a debating charm 
as a Sophomore . . . later advanced to the B. J. F. 
varsity . . . chairman of radio debates in senior year 
. . . made the long trip from Clinton every day . . . 
but was never late for class . . . chiseled an occa- 
sional meal in Kimball . . . loved to work, and had 



permanent possession of a chair in the library . . . 
his industry was rewarded by an Alpha Sigma Nu pin 
. . . Class Vice-President in sophomore . . . and 
Ring Committeeman in junior . . . always had some- 
thing on the fire . . . wide awake . . . with a hearty 
laugh . . . practically lived in 117 Wheeler with 
Murph and the Redhead . . . had a reserved table 
in the caf every morning where the week's festivities 
were discussed ... a V-7 candidate . . . and a man 
the Navy will be proud of. 



Football 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1. 2; Law- 
rence Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Lawrence High School 
Lawrence, Mass. 




Lea L. Duellette 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

3 Willoughby Street 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Our handsome "He-man" from Lawrence . . . real 
ability on the gridiron . . . resembled brother, Hank 
. . . always alert . . . played football with his head 
as well as his body . . . Stockily built . . . determined 
. . . was easily set apart from the other players . . . 
peculiar strut . . . southpaw passes . . . was hit so 
hard against Providence once that he was unconscious on 
his feet for several minutes ... no one knew about it 
. . . Played first base for the Freshman team . . . 
gave it up to devote all his time to football . . . and 



to his studies . . . Model student . . . never unpre- 
pared in class . . . conscientious worker . . . be- 
lieves in doing a thing well . . . and in doing it 
himself . . . Quiet type . . . Lost his best friend in 
Holley . . . both were seen constantly together on the 
campus and down-town . . . Maintains he is one of 
those rare specimens known as women-haters . . . 
though very popular with the fair sex . . . still visited 
Clinton frequently . . . His sincerity- and honesty will 
mean a great deal in future life . . . good luck, Leo. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; 
Football 1 ; Baseball 1 ; Intramural 
Sports 2, 3, 4; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 
4. 



Prepared at Hopkinton High School 
Hopkinton, Mass. 



Paul Metivier Fhipps 



ACHELOR OF ARTS 

21 Ash Street 
Hopkinton, Mass. 



The genial lad from Hopkinton . . . our candidate to 
replace Charles Atlas . . . juggles ice around his home 
town all summer . . . just to keep cool . . . All- 
around athlete . . . backbone of Worcester '43 in all 
intramurals . . . handles himself like a big-leaguer 
on the diamond . . . played football for the Hop- 
kinton Stone Throwers . . . basketball with St. John's 
Holy Name Champions . . . Broad and tolerant un- 
derstanding of the odd world about him ... ex- 
pressed in his deep sense of humor . . . Favorite 
topic of conversation: the virtues of everyone . . . 



especially of a certain young lady . . . Interested 
student of philosophy . . . member of the Aquinas 
Circle . . . Perfect fit for the Marine Officer's Train- 
ing program ... a strong-armed man with plenty 
above the shoulders . . . Always ready to hear your 
troubles ... or have his own heard . . . makes 
them sound very pleasant . . . extremely generous 
. . . Nothing false about Paul . . . never a goody- 
goody . . . modest as he is firm and sincere . . . 
Faithful Sodalist . . . true Holy Cross man . . . true 
United States Marine. 



Intramural Debating 1, 2 ; Intramural 
Sports 3, 4 ; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Classical High School 
Worcester, Mass. 




Charles Alfred Palachi 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

334 Millbury Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Good time Charley . . . full of pep . . . good- 
natured . . . Spent many extra hours at the Cross 
... he and his big Packard were inseparable . . . 
together they made many mysterious trips to Boston 
on Saturdays . . . took delight in country driving 
. . . Pearl Harbor put an end to that . . . attended 
any and all H. C. social events . . . affectionately 
called "Toto" by his friends . . . neat . . . looked 
fastidious even in his lab coat . . . knew lots of 
people both in and around the Cross . . . keeper 



of the funds of the Chemists' Club ... a job which 
fitted his business-like mind . . . sported a crew cut 
when we first knew him ... it disappeared after a 
short time, but why? . . . was unchallenged as he 
swept into the position of vice-president of the "Lab 
Rats" ... a man of high ideals to which he strictly 
adhered, in spite of his cavorting . . . just enough 
seriousness to temper his love for a good time . . . 
will always remain a good friend. 





Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Soci- 
ety 1; Italian Academy 1, 2; Milford 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Medway High School 
Medway, Mass. 



Joseph He nry Fatenza 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

164 Village Street 
Medway, Mass. 



Presenting "Little Joe" ... all 220 pounds and 75 
inches of him . . . the biggest fellow in the graduating 
class . . . plays football, as you might have guessed 
. . . hailed as another Joe Delaney . . . but an injury 
has hampered his career since sophomore year . . . 
unconscious for a half -hour after playing brilliantly in 
the heat of Louisiana . . . also quite a baseball player 
. . . caught for the frosh ... as member of the Med- 
way Legion team, Joe landed in the play-offs in a tourna- 
ment in Boston ... a rather serious fellow . . . 



though he could and did appreciate a good joke . . . 
liked to discuss philosophy with "Fuzzy" behind 
Wheeler Hall ... sat next to "Bubby" in American 
Literature class . . . which he enjoyed more than any 
other course on the Hill . . . caught scarlet fever in 
junior . . . and tried valiantly to pass it to all the 
faculty . . . succeeded in infecting only one member 
. . . takes everything "in good time" . . including 
wars . . . hopes to be Lieutenant Joseph Potenza, U. 
S. M. C. 



Intramural Debating 2 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 3, 4; French Academy 1, 2, 3, 
President 4; Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Mt. St. Charles Academy 
Woonsocket, R. I. 







Hichard Poulin 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

1047 Beacon Street 
Brookline, Mass. 



The door swings open ... a breathless figure comes 
bounding in . . . the latest news is told . . . and out 
he goes . . . 'Tis "Pooh" . . . friendly, likeable 
. . . with a dashing manner about him . . . one of 
the keenest fellows in the class . . . present at every 
"session" . . . would oppose "Si" and "J. J." in ar- 
gument often into the wee hours ... a pre-med 
major and a student who knew what he was after 
. . . had many tales to tell of his preparatory days at 
Mt. St. Charles ... an authority on all things French 
. . . history . . . language . . . customs . . . 



associate editor of our Le Croise and president of 
the French Academy . . . amazed all with his ability 
when taking the strength tests . . . possessor of many 
nicknames, which only attest to his popularity . . . de- 
livered his points while bouncing about the room and 
gesturing with a cigarette in his hands ... an author- 
ity on events of the sporting world ... his heroes 
were the Red Sox . . . always ready to help out a class- 
mate ... or, with a chuckle, to enter into a fun-loving 
escapade . . . "Pooh" will long be remembered by 
his classmates as a wonderful fellow. 




Sodality 2, 3, 4; History Academy 4; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Worcester 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Peter's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Paul Thomas Price 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

19 Freeland Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Noble offspring of South Worcester and Saint Peter's 
. . . small . . . active . . . friendly . . . Henry- 
Clay of the cafeteria ... a rebel at heart . . . would 
defend or denounce any thesis . . . uphold any ob- 
jection . . . junior partner of McCarthy and Price 
Consolidated — Masters of Mischief . . . had a beard 
which showed Bolshevistic tendencies . . . rabid intra- 
mural fan . . . publicity agent for the Worcester '43 
ball teams . . . Noisiest forward of the intramural 
league . . . wielded an uncertain willow on the 
diamond . . . constant heckler of McCarthy's pitching 



. . . jitterbug of Fitton Field . . . worked harder 
than Grigas on every touchdown . . . Liked his music 
on the dreamy side ... an artist of note . . . the 
notes being interspersed with dive bombers and charg- 
ing halfbacks ... an Economics major . . . had a 
talent for facts and figures . . . breezed through his 
majors with little difficulty . . . favorite haunt — Asta's 
Spa . . . where he settled international arguments over 
a "coke" . . . V-7 candidate . . . future ensign of 
the fleet ... a true man among the men of the sea 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debat- 
ing 1, 2; Aquinas Circle 4; Irish Cul- 
tural Academy 1, 2; Tennis 2, 3 ; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary So- 
ciety 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3; Pennsylvania 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Cathedral Preparatory 

School 

Erie, Pa. 




James Matthew Quinn 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

421 Arlington Road 
Erie, Pa. 



The Irishman from Erie ... a top-ranking tennis 
player on the Hill . . . was good football material 
in freshman year until an injury forced his retirement 
. . . also played one of the best games of golf in 
Beaven . . . just edged out by Father Bean in the 
senior tournament ... a steady and thorough worker 
. . . plans to follow the footsteps of his father in 
the law profession . . . Still found time to keep up 
with certain interests at Trinity . . . could almost be 
said to commute regularly to Washington . . . Liked 



the combination of a good book and a pipe . . . hit 
the top of the Dean's list ... a connoisseur of good 
humor ... a habitual punster . . . really enjoyed 
hearing and telling jokes . . . Loud exponent of the 
merits and demerits of various dance orchestras . . . 
showed marked preference for Will Bradley . . . has 
signed up with the Leathernecks for the duration . . . 
a ready smile, a quick and keen wit, plus a solid, well- 
rounded personality will make Jim as welcome every- 
where as he was on the Hill. 




Sodality 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 
Ring Committee 3; New Jersey Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Horace Mann 
New York, N. Y. 



John Joseph Quinn 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

185 Cambridge Avenue 
Englewood, N. J. 



"Jawn, the Joker" . . . did more towards raising the 
morale of his classmates than any other factor in the 
school . . . those nightly sorties from top Alumni 
. . . inflicted woe on any and all who lingered long 
beneath his window — without an umbrella . . . faint 
resemblance to Ronnie Cahill in dining hall ... to- 
gether with "mah friend" augmented the fellows' re- 
laxation during meals . . . despite his impish pranks, 
found more than enough time for his studies . . . 
really wore out the philosophy books . . . gave tne 



school's electricity bill an upward zoom during exams 
. . . Member of the varsity football team for three 
years . . . "We want Quinn" . . . impregnable on 
the defense . . . with typical furor defended "Jersey" 
and "The City" just across the George Washington 
Bridge . . . the Yanks and "Joltin' Joe" were among 
his favorite topics . . . this 210 pounds of joviality 
and student will be missed . . . "Red" can't fail, if 
he meets life with the same spirit and drive that he 
did philosophy and the opposing guard. 



Sodality 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 1, 
2; Purple Patcher 4; Purple 3, 4, 
Exchange Editor 4; Aquinas Circle 4; 
History Academy 1, 2, 4; Intramural 
Sports 1 ; Philharmonic 1 ; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2; French Academy 1, 2, 3; 
Springfield Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Le Croise 
2, 3. 

Prepared at Cathedral High School 
Springfield, Mass. 




J. William Quinn 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

127 Piney woods Avenue 
Springfield, Mass. 



The imperturbable Mr. Quinn . . . nonchalance per- 
sonified . . . "Emily Post" of the Centennial Class 
. . . knew the social niceties . . . matched it with 
a complete knowledge of what the well-dressed college 
man will wear on all occasions . . . renowned for his 
versatility . . . musician, chemist, cartoonist, litterateur 
. . . his writings appeared in every undergraduate 
publication . . . the only member of the class to ac- 
complish this feat . . . Mr. Originality ... re- 
member the Graussensnaf and the Tasmanian Wolf 
Skin} . . . had trouble figuring out family trees in 



History . . . master of the descriptive definition . . . 
Seen daily in Chem lab . . . convinced that the el- 
ements were set against him . . . sun-worshipper 
. . . pillar of Purple strength against the Tomahawk 
in the annual grid classic . . . combined the Arts, 
Pre-Med, and Chemistry courses . . . never missed a 
detail . . . Enlisted Reservist . . . "I can hardly wait" 
. . . could shower, shave, shampoo, and dress for class 
in three minutes ... he and Whelan drove Steve 
crazy with their clarinet duets . . . extraordinary wit 
. . . his variety of talents can't miss recognition. 




Sodality 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; Intra- 
mural Sports 3, 4; Worcester Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at South High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Joseph Paul Quinn 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

34 Stoneland Road 
Worcester, Mass. 



Senor Jose . . . one of Worcester's better historians 
. . . one of the country's better diplomats ... al- 
ways on the go . . . always explaining something 
with wide sweeps and subtle gestures of his hands 
. . . A great jitterbug . . . excellent imitator of 
the stage and screen stars . . . the judge with the 
tape measure at the Worcester Club dance . . . Ef- 
fervescent in conversation . . . explained national 
crises and local gossip in a high, excited voice ... de- 
fended the beauties of Worcester against many a boarder 
. . . Possessor of the largest suspenders on the Hill 



... all green and a half-inch thick . . . Could see 
humor in the darkest of situations . . . even when 
the joke was on himself . . . Protected Steve from 
Greska's ribbing . . . thought George was too tough on 
him . . . Good bowler . . . Intramuralite . . . giving 
his all for Worcester '43 . . . preferred his com- 
panions to athletics . . . Perpetual smoker ... al- 
ways found in a haze of blue . . . One of Fr. 
Cahill's faithful Sodalists ... a friend to everybody 
. . . admired by all. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 
1 ; Tomahawk 1 ; Scientific Society 1 ; 
Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir 1; Mission 
Crusade 3; French Academy 1, 2; North 
Shore Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; 
Greek Play 1 ; Freshman Reception Com- 
mittee 4. 

Prepared at Lynn Classical High School 
Lynn, Mass. 




Edward Thomas flafferty 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

173 North Common Street 
Lynn, Mass. 



Our Lochinvar from Lynn . . . the singing pre-med 
. . . saw the lighter side of life . . . and enjoyed it 
. . . Mornings roomie Carl was up with the first 
Cloister bell . . . while Ed slept on . . . making 
a Dagwood dash for class . . . usually late, but made 
up for it once there . . . Astounded Father Busam 
and Mr. Malumphy by inventing new organs for the 
human body . . . The pre-med schedule wasn't enough 
for Ed . . . pestered the Dean to let him take extra 
courses . . . which did not, however, interfere with 
his social life ... a fine tenor . . . who thrilled fair 



maids on Glee Club tours . . . or so he said . . . 
Could jitterbug as well as he could walk . . . and 
liked it much better . . . Impetuous Ed . . . spent 
an extra night in New York with Johnson to show 
the big city to Detroit visitors . . . then hitch-hiked 
home with six cents in his pocket . . . Also took up 
golf with Johnson . . . Dick plays a good game now 
. . . Ed just plays . . . Many doctors write auto- 
biographies . . . we'll look forward to Ed's ... it 
will be a tale well told . . . signifying success. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3; Intra- 
mural Debating 2 ; History Academy 2 ; 
Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. John's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Stanley D. Hapinchuk 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

90 Endicott Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



The Borgia acolyte . . . the dashing elan of his Russian 
ancestors coupled with good old New England industry 
. . . Combined his passion for caf society and his 
ambition for a medical career by making the caf his 
study-hall . . . between cokes he could always force 
a hearing for his version of Reader's Digest humor 
. . . Rumored to possess a rare jewel, the numismatist's 
delight, a nickel with two heads ... he modestly 
denies it . . . Pet theme: the superiority of Russian 
to Polish weddings (just a quibble) . . . Suspected 



of being a Bolshevik or something because of his red 
tie and the bombs he used to build in chem lab . . . 
Skilled at boring from within and general agitating 
. . . But can, when in an eloquent mood, make the 
most touching appeals on the campus . . . "Rap" 
is really loved, even by those, who have never won 
a toss from him . . . generous of spirit and deeply 
reverent beneath his gay exterior ... a good student 
... it took a hundred years but we produced him. 



Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; French 
Academy 1, 2 ; Labor Academy 3; Met- 
ropolitan Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Xavier High School 
New York, N. Y. 




Raymond Robert Ruber 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

333 West 14th Street 
New York, N. Y. 



"Rocky," the Greenwich Village kid ... six feet and 
three inches of joviality . . . Bill Fitz, Art Murphy, 
"The Wop" and "Rock" formed the "Mob" . . . 
They owned a couple of cars during their stay . . . 
almost got to Stafford Springs in the old Plymouth 
. . . Ray's stalwart body plugged many gaps in intra- 
mural football tussles . . . The leading softball pitcher 
for Wheeler I ... as could be expected from a real 
Yankee fan . . . Often seen dividing his attention be- 
tween the New York "News" and a card game . . . 



Was on the "Boards" . . . Always very partial to 
courses in English Literature . . . Frequented Sock's 
at any and all hours . . . Thought that Heaven 
had come to earth in the form of New York City 
... To him that little old town had not a sour note 
. . . Saturday nights found him in town . . . sharped 
up and raring to have a great time . . . Spent his 
money freely . . . but sold his car at Winter's arrival 
rather than buy a roof for it . . . Good things also come 
in big packages. 




Intramural Debating 2 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Windham High School 
Willimantic, Conn. 



Michael Davitt Riordan, Jr 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

165 Lewiston Avenue 
Willimantic, Conn. 



Polished representative of the Nutmeg State . . . 
Equally at home in the laboratory or downtown with 
the boys on Saturday nights ... a sub-par golfer 
. . . Occupied top position on the famous Beaven 
Golf Team . . . travelled in the direction of the 
Pakachoag Golf Course as soon as the snow melted 
. . . Scorned staying up late the night before an exam 
. . . Claimed the sleep did him more good . . . Spent 
many afternoons reading . . . another favorite pastime 
... A good dancer . . . expert on boogie-woogie 



and the newer trends in swing . . . Consistently high 
in the Chemistry course . . . Spent a torrid week-end 
in New York in junior year . . . Played a good game 
of basketball in the intramural contests . . . Had a 
tough time controlling his straw thatch . . . An avid 
sports fan . . . Supported the New York Yankees 
against the horde of Red Sox adherents ... A witty 
conversationalist . . . congenial and a good sport 
. . . Inquisitive and tenacious nature will stand him in 
good stead in his chosen profession. 



Sodality 2, 3, 4; Tomahawk 1, 2; Labor 
Academy 2, 3, 4; Southern Connecticut 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Bulkeley School 
New London, Conn. 




Daniel Roche 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

115 Main Street 
Old Lyme, Conn. 



Bully of Beaven . . . those who attempted to usurp 
Dan's title were frowned into submission . . . always 
happy ... in spite of the fact that he almost never cut 
a class . . . Consistent in studies . . . homespun phil- 
osopher . . . raconteur . . . Dan's room was always 
the center of activities in a blackout . . . Bud Casson 
taught him the airplane spin . . .he's been an expert at 
it ever since . . . rarely off corridor during the week- 
end . . . Used to drop in at Southbridge once in a 
while . . . favorite subject was Spanish . . . wanted 
to travel through South America just to improve his 



proficiency in the tongue ... A good bowler . . . 
had a famous exhibition bout with the "Mouse" one 
warm spring evening . . . smokes the largest pipe on 
campus . . . likes to play solitaire . . . and casino, 
with Tom Meehan . . . Interested in radios . . .used 
to tinker with a large outfit . . . Spent summers driving 
a taxi . . . covered quite a bit of New England that 
way . . . There was a movement under way to make 
Dan the college's official air raid warden . . . he's in- 
terested in insurance ... a man with endurance. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 
2; Scientific Society 2, 3, 4; Purple 2; 
Philharmonic 1, 2, 4; French Academy 
2; Fitchburg Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 4. 

Prepared at St. Bernard High School 
Fitchburg, Mass. 



Walter Francis Roche 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

1091 Water Street 
Fitchburg, Mass. 



Walter . . . man of many moods and mysteries . . . 
clever . . . talented . . . deep, but not unfathomable 
. . . unpredictable at all times . . . Master of the 
extemporaneous speech . . . can speak ad infinitum 
on any given subject . . . Played a most unorthodox 
violin for the Philharmonic for two seasons . . . Proud 
possessor of the "Trained Memory" . . . can recite 
with gestures "Gunga Din" ... his classic, Hugo 
Baskerville . . . Has started many of our wildest and 
best rumors on their way ... A hard-working pre- 
med ... no experiment ever left unfinished . . . 
often concocted some "devil's brew" which exploded 



... a periodic reader of huge medical books . . . for 
professional reasons resents the name "Butch" . . . 
Spends his leisure time in the Caf . . . notorious 
story-teller . . . constantly working out someone's 
chem problems . . . Reads all the latest books . . . 
has already started a medical library of his own . . . 
Loves to play the charging Crusader on his noble 
steed, "Tubby" ... Is often seen touring the hills of 
Fitchburg a cheval . . . Headed for Tufts medical 
after graduation . . . His success there will be as it 
was here . . . well-earned and complete. 



Intramural Debating 2 ; Scientific Soci- 
ety 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; Irish Cul- 
tural Academy 2 ; Class Secretary 4 ; In- 
tramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 2, 
3, 4; Labor Academy 2, 3, 4; Maine 
Club 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Deering High School 
Portland, Me. 




Peter James Hoqers 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

398 Brighton Avenue 
Portland, Me. 



Came to us at the beginning of Sophomore year . . . 
St. Anselm's had him first ... It wasn't long before 
he made a name, academically and for his ready wit 
. . . Unusually conscientious about his work . . . 
frequently Saturday night would find him at his desk 
in the "wee hours" . . . Many have him to thank for 
their transportation to the Syracuse game . . . his 
beachwagon was piled high with enthusiastic rooters 
and baggage . . . Maine never had a more rabid and 
sincere booster . . . since the Glee Club's Portland 



trip his claims have been substantiated by satisfied cus- 
tomers . . . His career as a C. P. A. will have to wait 
until the Marines let him go . . . "Pete" . . . usually 
clowning . . .with one of the heartiest laughs in the 
class . . . serious only when in class or studying . . . 
Took business away from Railway Express before va- 
cations . . . with the help of that beachwagon . . . 
He'll make a good Marine officer . . . dependability 
and intelligence always pay off . . . Watch for Captain 
Rogers ! 




B. J. F. 3, 4; Intramural Debating 1, 2 
Purple Patcher Business Manager 4 
Tomahawk 1, 2; Varsity Debating 3, 4 
Lecture Debating 3, 4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Purple Key 4; Mission 
Crusade 2 ; Albany Club Treaurer 1, 
Secretary 2, Vice-President 3, President 
4. 

Prepared at La Salle Institute 
Troy, N. Y. 



John Edward Ryan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

146 Maple Avenue 
Troy, N. Y. 



A hearty smile and a deep chuckle . . . Unruly hair 
and gesturing hands ... a good word for everyone 
. . . friendly, unruffled and easy-going, but always 
determined ... A keen mind and a subtle humor . . . 
Student, debater, orator, business man and politician 
. . . Business manager of the Patcher and enthu- 
siastic participant in campus activities ... a thing done 
by Jack was done well ... A leader in "chinning" 
sessions . . . Ready to listen to the troubles of fellow- 
students . . . also ready to go out of his way to help 
. . . Tiresome trips home were always enlightened by 
his company . . . Third member of the inseparable 



trio in Freshman year with "Fitz" and "Doug" . . . 
Stalwart member of the Albany Club . . . Could 
always fix up a date . . . Will long remember the 
unexpected, early-morning awakening in Sophomore 
year after a night in Boston . . . Exponent and defender 
of his singing and boxing victories over J. J. Kearney 
in Junior year . . . The condition of his hair his only 
worry . . . Up to the minute on current events . . . 
Learned quickly and thoroughly . . . Conscientious 
about his duties . . . everyone's friend . . . Ensign 
Ryan of the Supply Corps. 



History Academy 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Italian 
Academy 1, 2; New Haven Club 1, 2, 3. 

Prepared at New Haven High School 
New Haven, Conn. 




Pet 



e r 



J. S 



a l a n o 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

24 Franklin Street 
New Haven, Conn. 



"The Count" . . . who made our life on the Hill a 
pleasant one . . . the boy we laughed with . . . 
never at . . . knew and known by everyone . . . 
A close follower of the national pastime, "Pete" was 
one of the few Giant rooters . . . had great plans 
for the team . . . especially "Youn-g-g-g-g of New 
York" . . . quite a ballplayer himself ... in fresh- 
man year, singled against B. C. with the bases loaded 
... an intramuralite of high standing . . . Withal 
a good student . . . struggling pre-med . . . chem- 
istry, biology and physics labs knew him well . . . 



"Sharp" dresser . . . who very naturally made friends 
with many of the opposite sex during his days — 
and nights — at Holy Cross . . . quick to tell about 
his life and times . . . equally quick to laugh or 
wisecrack . . . had a share of McSweeney-Reher & Co. 
. . . probably will make the world laugh itself into 
good health . . . and collect high fees . . . "Pete" 
recognizes an opportunity when he sees one . . . 
he used to study at night on third Carlin because the 
rattle in the shower room kept him awake. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 2; 
Band 2, 3, 4; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Prepared at Douglas Memorial High 
School 



East Douglas Mass. 



Peter P. Salatiello 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Grove Street 
East Douglas, Mass. 



One of the hardy few to weather the "chem" course 
. . . Always unruffled . . . even when the going 
seemed toughest . . . never worried about the most 
difficult exams . . . seldom late for class in spite of 
the fact that he had to come 15 miles . . . Efficient 
and competent . . . casual in manner . . . Sincerely 
mad about chemistry . . . spent many hours dabbling 
with test tubes and other intricacies . . . Quiet re- 
garding his social life, but got around with the best 
of them ... A connoisseur of music, popular as well 



as classical . . . Played with the band and always 
turned in a fine performance . . . could never do too 
much for band or school . . . Good-natured . . . 
plenty of spirit . . . always ready with a problem to 
while away idle hours . . . Not a genius, he worked 
for his marks . . . made out very well indeed . . . 
The world of chemistry needs men like "Pete" . . . 
who want to learn . . . and once having learned, do 
not forget. 



Intramural Debating 2 ; History Acad- 
emy 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; French 
Academy 2; Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4; L? 
Croise 2. 

Prepared at Chelsea High School 
Chelsea, Mass. 




William Arthur S a r t d r e 1 1 i 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

460 Eastern Avenue 

Chelsea, Mass. 



The second "r" in Bill's last name is never pronounced, 
at least in these parts . . . though the name is familiar 
enough . . . Where did we see it? . . . every term 
on the Dean's List . . . every fall on the football 
program . . . brains and brawn . . . social reformer 
on second Wheeler in Junior year . . . after lights, 
for the boys' own benefit . . . also shone on Saturday 
nights, with midnight snacks ... It took a week's 
exile to make him wear his coat in late June . . . 
one of Kimball's pitching stars . . . also caught for 
the same club . . . expects to see the world after 



graduation . . . via V-7 . . . Ready at any time to talk 
about Chelsea and its inhabitants . . . particularly one 
... a Bull and a Bear . . . the first on the gridiron 
. . . the second in studying . . . studies came first 
. . . Bill came to the Cross for an education . . . 
he's taking one away with him . . . somewhat of an 
"Old Faithful" . . . ready to spring into the game 
. . . or to answer a question in metaphysics . . . took 
Fr. Stockman's jokes well . . . and usually had some 
to give back. 




Sodality 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 2; 
Aquinas Circle 4; Sanctuary Society 3, 
c 4; Choir 2, 3, 4; Italian Academy 1, 2, 
3 ; French Academy 1 ; Metropolitan 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Bishop Loughlin Memorial 

High School 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Francis Paul Scavulln 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

2212 Avenue M 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Brooklyn's Student Prince . . . would have lost his 
citizenship, if it had been discovered that he didn't 
care what the Dodgers did . . . busy every second . . . 
if he had no afternoon classes, he'd sign up for a 
course downtown ... a man of many and varied 
accomplishments . . . Life Scout . . . master coun- 
sellor in a summer camp . . . Red Cross graduate 
. . . expert at shorthand . . . Began his day by 
serving an early Mass and ended it by serving a late 
supper . . . once dished up onion on white for the 
corridor and no one could speak to anyone for a week 



. . . took in all Kimball's lectures and movies . . . 
the Brooklynite in him did come out . . . Fritz had 
the best tan in the Fall and the flashiest socks in the 
Spring . . . one of Fr. Keating's song-birds . . . 
Always picking up knowledge on the side ... a man 
who worked at the books and finally discovered that 
they were working for him . . . full of factual knowl- 
edge . . . though slow to display it . . . Frank had 
far to go to equal his older brother's record . . . wie 
think he's done it. 



Intramural Debating 2 ; Purple Patch- 
er 4; Class Treasurer 1, 2, 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary So- 
ciety 3, 4; Purple Key 4; Mission Cru- 
sade 3, 4; Labor Academy 2; New Jer- 
sey Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 1 ; Chair- 
man Purple Patcher Dance 4. 

Prepared at Columbia High School 
South Orange, N. J. 




Roland Payne Schambach 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

20 Elm Court 
South Orange, N. J. 



A handsome smile ... a good word ... a slight 
drawl . . . that's "Rol," with a long "o," Schambach 
. . . Class treasurer for four years . . . Exponent of 
the good-neighbor policy . . . Just ask Maria, that 
real South American beauty . . . "Rocky," a leader of 
his class and a leader on the field of sports . . . Played 
a great game of football . . . liked golf too . . . A 
happy addition to any party or Saturday night gather- 
ing in town . . . Staunch member of the Orange group 
of the Jersey Club . . . helped to pay for the 1941 
Christmas dance . . . too bad he didn't get there . . . 



Without a doubt one of the best-natured men in school 
. . . Respected by his classmates . . . Another V-7 
man . . . Slaved on Navigation through Senior year 
. . . Had his troubles before the Junior Prom . . . 
but things worked out . . . Did up all the exclusive 
spots in New York with "Howie" one vacation . . . 
they never recovered financially . . . Served Father 
Donaldson every morning at the crack of dawn . . . 
Close friends called him Payne . . . See you in Tokyo, 
"Rol," with a long "o." 




Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Lowell Club 1, 2, 
3,4. 

Prepared at St. John's Preparatory 

School 

Danvers, Mass. 



James Peter Scondras 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

287 Dutton Street 
Lowell, Mass. 



"The Chief" . . . only three-sport letter-man in the 
class . . . batted clean-up and .470 for Jack Barry 
. . . spun, twisted, ran, passed and kicked for Joe 
Sheeketski . . . passed, dribbled, sank plenty of 
baskets for "Moose" Krause . . . and through it all, 
remained the same pleasant, joking, modest, rather 
quiet "Jim" . . . one of the fastest men on any of the 
teams . . . there wasn't a varsity sport that Jim didn't 
shine in . . . practically won a pennant for Glens Falls 
. . . didn't smile when he was playing . . . took each 



sport seriously and put his heart into every movement 
. . . maybe that was why he was so good . . . Cut 
a smooth rug every Saturday night . . . quieted down 
a bit when he lost his best friend, Frankie Calabrese, 
to the Army . . . though he still enjoys practical jokes 
. . . even when they're on him . . . one of the first 
to get in the Marine Reserves ... if they want a 
hard, clean and certainly courageous fighter, they've 
got him in Jim. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Purple Patcher 
4; Tennis 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3, 4; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Classical High School 
Worcester, Mass. 




Francis Peter Sharry 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

121 Granite Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



"Dudley" . . . sleepy in the day time but wide-awake at 
night . . . tall, well-groomed . . . and husky long 
before the physical exercises began . . . maintained 
his brother's brilliant record in intramural sports . . . 
and outshone it at tennis . . . Superman of the serve, 
slice and slam ... if classes had been held on the courts, 
"Bat" would have headed the Dean's List . . . as it 
was, he starred in philosophy and sociology ... in his 
completely awake moments (after 10 p.m.) did field 
work in the latter science . . . never missed a Cross 



social event, or a "name" dance band downtown . . . 
partial to talent from Katherine Gibbs . . . firm hater 
of "stooges," grilled Americans, and walking . . . 
after it knocks, Opportunity will have to wait while 
"Bat" strolls over to open the door . . . "Bat" intends 
to lob his way through life, if it's easy . . . but if it 
starts getting fresh with him and tries to ace the boy 
. . . watch his steam . . . "Bat" plays and workSj 
hardest when the other fellow has the lead . . . and 
when he starts slamming, there's no stopping him. 




Sodality 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at South High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Daniel Joseph Shea 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

27 Hitchcock Road 

Worcester, Mass. 



Possessor of an unassuming demeanor and an appealing 1 
smile ... as well as a thatch of curly hair to top his: 
six-foot frame . . . Insisted he was not losing the* 
hair, that it was merely a high forehead which made it : 
appear so . . . One of the better-known Worcesterites 
. . . took his fun in stride . . . In a manner remin- 
iscent of Frank Morgan at his best, Dan could lend an 1 
aura of veracity to the most fantastic stories . . . spent 
many hours in caf and library discussing the world' 



situation . . . Academic forte was accounting . . . 
has been known as "the sarge" since the day he was 
picked to lead a platoon in physical training . . . Dan- 
claimed the instructor could not miss his qualities of 
leadership . . . Affiliated with H. C. before most of us 
had heard of it, was a batboy for Crusader nines while 
still in grammar school . . . has a litany of Purple 
diamond heroes at his fingertips . . . amiable, easy- 
going Dan ... a fellow who cannot miss. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 
2 ; Aquinas Circle 4 ; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 1, 2; Boston 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Prepared at St. Philip's Preparatory 
School 



Boston, Mass. 




George Joseph Shea 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

66 Rosewood Street 
Boston, Mass. 



George . . . the short lad with the long stride . . . 
which carried him silently but surely through four 
years on the Hill ... an anomaly ... a quiet "black 
Irishman" . . . but like still water, he ran deep . . . 
always friendly . . . knew everyone's name . . . and 
greeted him . . . Something of a practical philosopher 
. . . watched the world go by . . . garnered the 
wheat . . . discarded the chaff . . . the steadying 
element of the Shea-Diamond combination . . . kept 
"Wild Bill," his roomie, out of mischief ... on 
occasion . . . One of Fr. Foran's boys . . . kept the 
pamphlet rack filled ... A baseball player and fan' 



of note . . . sizzled in intramurals . . . though he 
met Cleveland, New York and Chicago fanatics on the 
Hill, stuck by his Hub favorites . . . others insisted 
he was stuck with them . . . Movie fan . . . haunted 
Kimball on Saturday evenings . . . reported to have 
been seen downtown twice in four years . . . report 
unconfirmed . . . Scholastic loves included English 
and Education . . . until the war shifted the emphasis 
from Shakespeare to Naval Science . . . Charter mem- 
ber of V-7 ... it took us four years to discover his 
worth . . . the world will be more perspicacious. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3, 
4; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at North High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



John Joseph Shea 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

28 Dallas Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Second down! Three yards to go! "Jack" was seen 
every football Saturday walking along the sidelines 
at Fitton Field and waving frantically with both arms 
. . . trying vainly to correct the scoreboard . . . used 
to keep the sportswriters advised on the distances and 
penalties . . . when not chasing footballs, doubled as 
a talent scout . . . always watching out for the welfare 
of the college . . . the strongest supporter of the 
Telegram . . . where he worked on the midnight shift 
. . . with the natural result that he did his dozing on 



a divan in the Porter's Lodge . . . steady Carroll 
Clubber . . . deserted by most of his pals in Senior 
year, when they joined the armed forces . . . but he 
got on . . . probably will take over John Kieran's 
place, if he can learn a little Shakespeare . . . already 
has all the stories . . . always willing to tell them 
. . . and always to a large audience . . . Favorite 
sport was tilting back in his chair and philosophizing, 
while smoke curled from his nostrils . . . contented. 



Aquinas Circle 4; Cross and Scroll 1, 2 ; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Labor 
Academy 3; Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Boston College High School 
Boston, Mass. 




Thomas Francis Shea 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

43 Kenwood Street 
Dorchester, Mass. 



One of the "babies" of the class, but lanky and rugged 
. . . with mischief in his eye Tom followed his 
brothers' footsteps on the Hill ... In first year he 
was just plain Tom . . . but by virtue of a misguided 
purchase of footwear, he won the monicker of "Nigger- 
boots" . . . those "yaller" shoes, however, ensconced 
a pair of mighty feet, for Tom was one of the best 
punters on intramural fields . . . Master garcon in the 
infirmary for many moons . . . "Well, boys, what was 



served in Kimball tonight? I had . . . " . . . Along 
with buddy Jack Lawlor, Tom had a penchant for coal 
trucks which prompted him to prefer personal taxi 
service one night in junior year . . . Super super- 
market saleman on Dorchester's Gallivan Boulevard in 
the summer time . . . Can always be found near Ed 
Walsh, a brother V-7 boy . . . Together they promise 
they will navigate in the best circles . . . Anchors 
aweigh, Tom . . . let's see you sail to the sky! 




Sodality 1 ; Intramural Sports 2 ; Wor- 
cester Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Fitchburg Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Leominster High School 
Leominster, Mass. 



Charles Edward Sheehan 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

111 Eighth Street 
Leominster, Mass. 



A friendly smile . . . blond unruly hair ... a slow 
easy gait . . . green coat and red tie . . . there was 
no mistaking Charlie . . . Came thirty miles to college 
every day, rain or shine . . . then slept through many 
a class . . . Took a leaf from the grasshopper's book 
and confidently advised friends to "put off until to- 
morrow what you don't have to do today" . . . yet 
always made out well when the marks were given out 
. . . mathematical whiz . . . historian in spare mo- 
ments . . . the grand and glorious past of our country 



proved interesting . . . Indeed, Charlie was a great 
lover of books . . . but never studied in the library 
. . . often found in the caf, doing a math problem 
or talking to a friend . . . Constant companion of 
"Mazz" . . . never wore a hat . . . claimed the fresh 
air made one's hair grow . . . Charlie's heart was 
drawn to the great outdoors . . . spent many an after- 
noon hunting and fishing . . . versatile and competent 
... a man of subtle humor . . . but serious when the 
occasion demanded it . . . Good luck, Charlie. 



B. J. F. 3, 4; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Tomahawk 1; Aquinas Circle 4; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Prepared at B. M. C. Durfee High 
School 



Fall River, Mass. 




Joseph £. Shelley, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

61 Ward Street 
Fall River, Mass. 



The world's greatest booster for the U. S. Marines 
. . . "Take my money, take my life, but don't insult 
the Marines" . . . Submitted to a crew cut once a 
year . . . then we knew that summer had arrived . . . 
A well-informed man with opinions which were vig- 
orously substantiated . . . ask Joe Kelley, who nearly 
lost his life by calling the Marines "a subsidiary or- 
ganization" . . . Joe was impetuous . . . wanted 
to take on the whole Brown cheering section at a 
basketball game . . . Invaded the middle West after 
sophomore year . . . was puzzled when Chicagoans 



asked for an interpreter . . . The fairer sex held a 
definite appeal for our Fall River friend . . . and 
vice-versa . . . Played basketball with abandon . . . 
liked baseball . . . got a three-months jump on every- 
body in physical training . . . and maybe his platoon 
didn't feel the effects . . . Roomed with "Big Ed" 
and supervised the latter's reducing program . . . 
Remembered for that old grey sweater . . .Time 
. . . and Spanish spoken with a French accent . . . 
Be seeing you, Joe ... on the shores of Tripoli. 




B. J. F. 3 ; Intramural Debating 2 ; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Philharmonic 
1, 2, 3; Band 1, 2, 3; Niagara Frontier 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Batavia High School 
Batavia, N. Y. 



Hichard Hinch Shults 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

26 Lewis Avenue 
Batavia, N. Y. 



A good mixer and a better mixture . . . some scholar 
. . . some athlete . . . some swing . . . some Phil- 
harmonic . . . some reticence . . . some oratory for 
the B. J. F. . . . plenty of seriousness ... a dash 
of a joke-book . . . shake well with laughter . . . 
the result is easily taken . . . either as "Dutch" or as 
"Little D" . . . intense purpose and drive . . . had 
a more rigid schedule than the N. Y. Central . . . 
The master of bridge strategy . . . concentrating 
on each move . . . pulling tricks out of thin air . . . 
. . . one of Beaven's best with a racquet . . . ping- 



pong paddle or cue . . . teamed with "Big D" in 
extra-curricular activities . . . and in sacrificing for 
physical training . . . He's a good man . . . ask his 
profs . . . ask Prof. Bouvier . . . took chemistry 
in that wicked Sophomore year and smiled right 
through . . . Had an interesting time on a B. J. F. 
radio program . . . but it was soon forgotten . . . 
constant companion of "Benjy" and "P. J." . . . down 
in the caf . . . The boy from upper New York who 
discovered that Worcester wasn't such a big city 
after all. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; B. J. F. 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Debating 2 ; Purple Patcher 
Sports Editor 4; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Feature Sports Editor 4; Aquinas Cir- 
cle 4; Varsity Debating 4; Lecture De- 
bating 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior As- 
sistant 4; French Academy 1, 2 ; Albany 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Prepared at Catholic Central High 
School 



Troy, N. Y. 




Benjamin John Singleton 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

113 9th Street 
Troy, N. Y. 



"Benjy" . . . the Bill Cunningham of the class . . . 
talented and conscientious . . . attained more than 
campus recognition with his "Purple Pennings" . . . 
familiar campus sight in his conservative attire . . . 
friendly and obliging . . . the originator of the Campus 
Finance Bureau . . . intellectually curious: never will- 
ing to accept the word of professor, textbook or 
weather man, until he has tested its veracity . . . plans 
someday to write the Great American Novel, from the 
background of newspaper reporting — and he might 
. . . Ben is at peace with the world, sprawled out with 



a best seller or a book of verse . . . Reserved except 
when among his best friends . . . then his laugh is 
the most rollicking and his quip the funniest . . . 
never speaks a word of deprecation . . . does every- 
thing with zest and spirit . . . "B" is a man of many 
sides and all of them admirable . . . Knows human 
nature and likes it . . . Makes it a point to know 
thoroughly what he is talking about . . . tall and 
good-looking ... if those things don't make him a 
successful writer, nothing will. 




B. J. F. 4; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Dramatic Society 1 ; Varsity Debating 4 ; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary 
Society 2 ; Glee Club 3 ; Italian Acad- 
emy 1, 2, 3; French Academy 2. 

Prepared at Abraham Lincoln High 

School 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Vincent T. Sireci 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

1425 Dahill Road 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Our true-blue Brooklynite . . . Roman nose . . . 
sunny smile . . . for those who backed "Our Bums" 
... Sir Echo . . . enthusiasm was his argument for 
anything worthwhile . . . Never seen walking to a 
meal ... or running to a class . . . not that he 
wasn't apt scholastically . . . one of the few who 
could really handle Dr. Peragallo's assignments . . . 
Spent hot summers "in town" working at the cool 
New Yorker Hotel . . . and windy winters in a suede 
jacket . . . reluctantly discarded it on week-ends 



. . . then the Polo coat saw service . . . One of the 
four "Quiz Kids" . . . along with "Mouse," Roche 
and MacDougald . . . the last claimed him as a pro- 
tege in the waiting-on department . . . considered a 
verbal battle with Tomasiello the most satisfying end 
to any day . . . nothing serious . . . although sincere, 
still had a streak of humor in him . . . Born an 
optimist . . . blessed with the ability to capitalize on 
the breaks . . . Vin made many friends in his time 
on the Hill . . . he'll continue to do so. 



Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Tomahawk 1 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3, 4; Labor Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; New 
Haven Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Connecticut Club 
1. 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at New Haven High School 
New Haven. Conn. 




James Thomas Smith 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

55 Lilac Street 
New Haven, Conn. 



"Rusty" . . . the New Haven lad with the cowboy 
gait . . . quietest of the Elm City aggregation . . . 
One of the class' most serious accountants . . . acted 
as somewhat of a muse in enlightening the A.B. boys 
in the subject . . . Led a well-rounded life on the 
Hill . . . sparked a couple of baseball teams nearly 
to intramural charms . . . hustled more than a few 
rushes of steak, etc. . . . practiced oratory at Labor 
Academy meetings on Tuesdays . . . M. C.'d "Packy's" 
after-lights lectures on Alumni I . . . oftentimes ran 



McKone ragged on the eye-chart contests . . . Never 
forgot or neglected "the matter" . . . "after all, what 
are we here for?" . . . Roomed with "Oakie" for 
four years . . . lost "Specks" in freshman year . . . 
Cheerful and dependable ... his good time was life 
. . . rather than particles ... a logical red-head 
. . . with a penchant for mirthful mischief . . . but 
always with an eye toward his goal . . . accounting 
and law . . . that goal will be achieved . . . for 
"Smitty's" an earnest and deserving Crusader. 




Intramural Debating 2 ; Purple 3 ; Aqui- 
nas Circle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 
4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; New 
Hampshire Club 1, 2. 

Prepared at St. John's High School 
Concord, N. H. 



Robert William Smith 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

232 North Main Street 
Concord, N. H. 



"By the way, did I tell you that you were a gentleman?" 
. . . thus did "The Mouse" back out of the room 
after borrowing a cigarette, book, or what have you 
. . . flattery, but effective . . . Holy Cross' original 
die-hard . . . as a freshman "Mouse" wasted no time 
in spreading his name and fame . . . even the faculty 
was forced to take notice . . . specialized in pyro- 
technics . . . gave charming renditions on the sweet- 
potato . . . inseparable buddy of "Dan," though they 
too had their moments . . . Has sworn off cigarettes 



daily for the past four years, usually weakening about 
8:29 A.M. . . . scholar of no mean talent . . . writer 
of Purple poetry . . . ever an innovator and oppor- 
tunist . . . "Bob" saw more practical applications of 
chemistry than those suggested by the textbook . . . 
and applied them . . . holds all sorts of unofficial 
records . . . weight-lifting is his forte . . . cherished 
the John L. Sullivan mode of fisticuffs . . . Naughty 
. . . but nice ... a country boy who never could 
get used to city life . . . witness his corn-cob pipe. 



Sodality 4; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; French 
Academy 2; Metropolitan Club 1, 2, 3, 
4. 

Prepared at Xavier High School 
New York, N. Y. 







Roger Frederick Smith 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

107 Chapel Road 
Manhasset, N. Y. 



"Roj" . . . the boy from the big city with the face 
of an especially naive Kalamazoo-an . . . proud of his 
home-town, as he should be . . . proud of his high 
school, as he has every right in the world . . . proud 
of the Dodgers, as . . . well . . . Never seen frowning 
. . . took the stiff Pre-Med course in his own way 
. . . but found time for relaxation . . . could always 
see his way clear to a round of golf . . . there were 
premonitions of marital trouble: every night "Roj" 
talked in his sleep . . . Had one great passion: auto- 



mobiles . . . loved to tinker around and keep them 
in perfect condition . . . got as much pleasure from 
polishing a car as he did from riding in one . . . 
"Rog's" wit was not bitter . . . but was abundant . . . 
his laugh was a compliment to anyone's feeble jests 
. . . his smile a boost to anyone's troubles . . . Looked 
with favor and longing towards Rosemont, as he did 
towards a medical career ... we know he'll be suc- 
cessful. 




Intramural Debating 2 ; Scientific Society 
1, 2, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Pennsylvania Club 1, 2, 3, 4; German 
Academy 1, 3. 

Prepared at Allentown Preparatory 

School 

Allentown, Pa. 



Lawrence Thomas Smyth 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

111 North 8th Street 
Allentown, Pa. 



"Larry" . . . hearty in laughter and pleasant in con- 
versation . . . but when it came to studies, he was 
all seriousness and work . . . tall . . . well-dressed 
. . . always good for a touch when someone was 
broke . . . Ardent member of the Scientific Society, 
where he picked up all that might help him when he 
gets his M.D. . . . usually seen with Jim Nagle after 
5 P.M. lab on his way to the P. O. . . . argued phil- 
osophy with "Mouse" over a cup of tea in the caf 
. . . liked to play tennis and showed a powerful fore- 



hand . . . His ears always perked up when someone 
mentioned the Quaker State . . . Larry wasn't much 
for bull sessions but if he did get in on one, he always 
let it be known what side he was on . . . although 
looking like a scholar behind his horn-rimmed glasses, 
(and really being one) he still managed to get plenty 
of social life . . . and athletic life in the intramurals 
. . . Larry is the "backbone of the community" type 
. . . He's usually quiet . . . and it takes a great deal 
to get him aroused . . . but when he is . . . watch out ! 



Sodality 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 2; 
Purple Patcher 4; Mission Crusade 
1 ; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Classical High School 
Worcester. Mass. 




Paul Eli Soulliere 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

21 Beeching Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Serious, hard-working, attentive to the duty at hand 
. . . that's Paul . . . driver of the day-student band- 
wagon . . . shining light of the economics course . . . 
hit the Dean's List in freshman year and found he 
liked it there . . . Scholastic philosophy held no terrors 
for Paul . . . merely applied common sense to the 
intricate theses . . . discovered Dinand Library on 
his first day at the Cross . . . has been a faithful 
visitor ever since . . . browsing through economic 
reviews . . . picking up stray bits of knowledge wher- 



ever he could ... he applied ut cognoscant to him- 
self . . . and found it worked . . . backed the ex- 
clusive Worcester club . . . devoted the fall to Fitton 
football and the winter to Elm Park skating . . . upset 
only when an exam was in the offing . . . has never 
been known to miss an opportunity . . . and he won't 
miss the big one when it comes a-knocking ... a 
fellow who's worked as hard as Paul is able to recog- 
nize the knock . . . stalwart member of Fr. Cahill's 
branch of the Sodality. 




Intramural Debating 2 ; Dramatic Soci- 
ety 2 ; Aquinas Circle 4 ; Cross and 
Scroll 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 
4; Track 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 
4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; Master of 
Ceremonies 4; German Academy 2, 
Secretary; Ohio Club 1, 2, 3, 4; West- 
ern Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Ignatius High School 
Cleveland, O. 



James John Stanard, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

624 East 94th Street 
Cleveland, Ohio 



"Smiles" Stanard . . . the Ipana Kid from Cleveland 
. . . who never could bear the Eastern pronunciation 
of "hoss" . . . growled out his "r's" . . . Quiet 
humor . . . infectious grin . . . though it turned a 
little ghastly when he lost a tooth . . . Combination 
of athlete and scholor . . . star blocker for Wheeler I 
. . . star student in Section A . . . had a flair for 
the sciences . . . with a firm foundation in Greek, 
Latin . . . combined the sciences and the arts . . . 
President of the Cross and Scroll . . . also Master 
of Ceremonies of the Sanctuary Society . . . served 
faithfully for four years . . . Smooth dresser, with a 



fondness for plaids, and dazzling neckties ... A 
social lion . . . who insists upon formal introductions 
. . . Enjoyed shocking "Wee Willie" . . . literally 
. . . intensely serious bridge-player . . . always will- 
ing to correct a fellow player . . . often rather roughly 
. . . joined in Wheeler's midnight banter . . . with 
his own stories of the railroads and the potentialities of 
the Indians . . . Appeared in best form the night of 
the Prom . . . splendidly mirthful . . . Uncle Sam 
will be able to use "Jim" . . . he'll do anything . . . 
and do it well. 



Sodality 1, 2; Football 1; Baseball 1, 
2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Labor 
Academy 4; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Classical High School 
Worcester, Mass. 




Edward Francis Staruk 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

42 Spofford Road 

Worcester, Mass. 



Our own Tex Rickard . . . all-around athlete at 
Classical . . . unfortunately a trick knee kept him 
out of Cross sports . . . man-about-town . . . com- 
pactly built and forever attired in varying hues of 
gabardine . . . smoked as many pipefuls as others did 
cigarettes . . . boyhood pal and manager of the famous 
"Stutz" Modzelewski . . . played Damon to Dick 
Creedon's Pythias . . . though they almost separated 
because of their arguments on matters political, literary, 
and military . . . breezed into class in January with a 



blistering sunburn . . . too much sun lamp . . . Held 
down scores of jobs . . . from greenskeeper at Pak- 
achoag to Y. M. C. A. instructor . . . enthusiastic 
. . . with everyone else, is confident of his own 
ability . . . quietly so . . . but rightfully . . . It's 
rumored that Billy Rose took lessons from Ed . . . 
promoted a basketball game in "Stutz's" honor in Junior 
year which won the envy of professional promoters 
. . . that was Ed's taste of the business world and he's 
anxious for more. 




Tomahawk 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Outing 
Club 1, 2, President 3, 4; New Hamp- 
shire Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Laconia High School 
Laconia, N. H. 



Frank Dennis Sullivan, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

94 Baldwin Street 
Laconia, N. H. 



"Sully" . . . the boy from ski-land . . . slaloming 
his way to a trophy in freshman year . . . complained 
of the noise on First Alumni . . . so he took "Quiet" 
Kearney to 3rd O'Kane . . . together with Kearney, 
kept "the home fires burning" on 3rd Carlin . . . 
liked the pretty smoke . . . Conscientious in his pre- 
med work . . . also in his presidency of the Outing 
Club . . . spending his summers on Lake Winni- 
pesaukee . . . and shooting swell golf (ask him about 
the 9 on the par 3) . . . Definitely prefers brunettes 



. . . shifted his allegiance from New Hampshire U. to 
Marymount . . . can hold his own in any session . . . 
which reminds us that "Si" is a Braves' fan (they do 
exist) . . . another example of his daring: when he 
ran up the H. C. flag the night before the B. C. game 
. . . much to the consternation of the B. C. campus 
. . . these are only sidelines . . . Sully burned his 
share of the midnight oil . . . also his share of the 
chem lab . . . Sully has his moments . . . ever ready 
for action . . . he'll find plenty of it in the Navy. 



Sodality 1, 2; B. J. F. 3; Intramural 
Debating 1, 2; Aquinas Circle 4; Irish 
Cultural Academy 2; Yacht Club 1, 2; 
Tennis 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; French 
Academy 1, 2; Lowell Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Keith Academy 
Lowell, Mass. 




Paul F. Sullivan 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

280 Beacon Street 
Lowell, Mass. 



"Sul" . . . volatile but diplomatic . . . the Irish mix- 
ture . . . sharp but smooth . . . distinguished by a 
distinctive walk . . . the now famous "Lowell hop" 
. . . also unparalleled exhibitions of shadow boxing, 
and a propensity for reshaping his friends' hats . . . 
not to mention renowned and terrifying nightmares 
to which Beaven I bore witness . . . Favorite recre- 
ational activity: verbally prodding Higgins . . . un- 
usually observant and possessed of a fine memory . . . 
mention of a band ... a movie ... a clothing style 
. . . or a public personality ... all brought remarks 



from "Sul" . . . Fiery tongue in the B. J. F. and 
in private discussions with roommate "Slats" Lynch 
. . . but charming with the fairer sex . . . specialized 
in double-talk . . . His stronger preferences were for 
year-round week-ending with Cummings and Driscoll 
. . . likes tennis ... as well as the Carroll Club, the 
Totem Pole, and Kimball's Starlight . . . Quick in 
manner, scrupulously neat in dress . . . "Sul" sat in 
Section A ... a consistently good student . . . who 
knows where he is going . . . and will get there. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; French 
Academy 1, 2; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 
4. 

Prepared at St. Stephen's High School 
Worcester, Mass. 



Thomas Edward Sullivan 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

61 Plantation Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



"Tomasheen Dhu" . . . the dark-haired Irishman . . . 
knew more Gaelic than any man on the Hill and would 
defend Kerry to the end from the insults of the eastern 
Irish . . . for three years Tommy was a senior partner 
of the team of Sullivan and Sullivan . . . schoolmates 
for fifteen years, a great confusion for professors . . . 
a consequent benefit to Tom and Andy . . . Combined 
the paradoxical qualities of diplomacy and astonishing 
frankness to keep peace in the cafeteria . . . formed 
many friends by his sincerity . . . During junior year 



Tom was president of a short-lived friendly greeting 
club . . . Tom was a staunch believer in the maxim 
"better late than never" ... so for three weeks he 
entered geometry class just before the slip was collected 
. . . Took advantage of his athletic build in all sports 
. . . smooth and frequent dancer . . . consistent 
Sodalist . . . interested in radio ... yet still found 
time to run the desk in the library reading room . . . 
Keep that Irish light in your eyes, Tom. 



Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 1, 
2, 3, 4; North Shore Club 1, 2, 3. 

Prepared at Peabody High School 
Peabody, Mass. 




John Joseph Sweeney 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

25 Walsh Avenue 
Peabody, Mass. 



"Jack" . . . youngest and one of the biggest of the 
class' football players . . . comes from little Peabody 
. . . he and Johnny Bezemes carried that school to 
the eastern Mass. football title . . . only inexperience 
kept him from the first team . . . his youth, (not his 
talent, courage or aggressiveness), was against him 
... no less talented and courageous off the gridiron 
. . . but considerably less aggressive . . . which 
is why we like him . . . Took Joe Zeno's place in 



Fr. Biggins' philosophy class . . . "Pepper's" nemesis 
in the Alumni Dorm . . . easily deals with scholastic 
and social problems . . . always has a big grin . . . 
goes out of his way to please a friend . . . his 
theory with trouble is "divide and conquer" . . . 
and when you're as big as Jack, you can conquer . . . 
or, at least, divide . . .he's three and a half years 
older now . . . but he still looks like a big kid ... a 
swell big kid . . . and that's what he is. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Worcester Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Fitchburg Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Bernard's High School 
Fitchburg, Mass. 



Martin Bernard Sweeney 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

89 Snow Street 
Fitchburg, Mass. 



Man of action . . . slender, sociable, ever smiling . . . 
pilot of the Fitchburg Flying Fortress . . . always on 
the run . . . the proverbial ant could take lessons from 
Marty . . . even managed to tend a store in his 
spare moments . . . One of those rare individuals 
who reads the book and sees the movie too . . . scholas- 
tic interests centered on sociology . . . took volumes 
of notes . . . burnt midnight oil before an exam 
and worried himself into high eighties . . . spent 
long hours in heroic effort to master the mysteries 



of Greek metrics . . . Came Saturday afternoon and 
Marty would work harder than the team to score a 
touchdown . . . came Saturday night: a dancer de 
luxe . . . Constantly feuded with McCarthy and 
Price about their high school alma maters . . . can 
by now withstand any scorching jibe . . . Soph C 
will never forget that trip to Nantasket in Marty's 
truck . . . Loudly disclaims any relationship closer 
than tenth cousin to Bill; but is proud of the name 
anyway . . . our sociable sociologist. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Debating 
2; Purple Patcher 4; Aquinas Circle 
4; Track 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3, 4; French Academy 1, 2; Fitchburg 
Club 1, 2. 



Prepared at St. Bernard's High School 
Fitchburg, Mass. 




William Charles Sweeney 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

47 Smith Street 
Fitchburg, Mass. 



The witty member of the gruesome twosome . . . 
maidens stopped praying after they met tall, dark and 
handsome "Bill" ... his smiles and good humor 
were never suspect . . . because Bill was sincere . . . 
presided over the caf contingent of the Fitchburg 
Grange . . . kidding Roche about his "artistic" friends, 
and cousin Marty about "the smart Sweeney" ... he 
and Joe Miller emerged bloody but unbowed from 
many a verbal battle . . . never forgot his short spin 
in Haskell's car (shall we say?) . . . but even made 
a joke out of that . . . for all his kidding, had a 



serious side . . . regular Sodalist . . . Dean's List 
. . . star of intramurals . . . did almost everything 
and did it well ... a dreamer's eyes and a doer's 
mind . . . could find a laugh in a punctured spare in 
war time . . . though he'd find a way to get another 
tire ... no back-slapper . . . but liked by everyone 
. . . there should be a reason . . . there is . . . 
Success formula: never complain, never belittle, always 
work, always have a ready smile . . . formula patented 
by Bill Sweeney. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4, Second Assistant 
Prefect 4; Purple Patcher 4; Toma- 
hawk 2, 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; Cross 
and Scroll 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 

1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Student Manager 

2, 3, Student Manager 4; Sanctuary So- 
ciety 1, 2, 3, 4, Senior Assistant 4; Mis- 
sion Crusade 1, 4; French Academy 1, 
2; Springfield Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 
2, Vice-President 3, President 4. 

Prepared at Cathedral High School 
Springfield, Mass. 



John P. Swords 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

42 Granville Street 
Springfield, Mass. 



"Big John" from Springfield . . . gained twenty 
pounds in freshman year . . . like Topsy, just "growed" 
. . . finally was forced to take drastic measures to stunt 
the process . . . the big boss of Intramuraland . . . 
functioned as a Judge Landis, schedule-maker, pub- 
licity man, and referee . . . least appreciated in the 
last capacity . . . also found time to star for his 
corridor team . . . the steadying, domestic influence 
in the Lawless-Swords partnership . . . although he 
grew less domestic as the years rolled by . . . would 
imperturbably read or study through a gabfest . . . 



with one ear cocked, of course ... a firm believer in 
frequent afternoon siestas . . . but always got his 
work done ... as his Dean's List position shows . . . 
Assistant Sodality Prefect . . . served Mass faithfully, 
though he could never find a cassock long enough . . . 
Sons of Springfield flocked to his room to read the 
hometown newspaper . . . suffered as a Red Sox 
fan . . . his "Spanish castle" is a life like that of 
Ted Husing . . . John . . . the boy with the big 
frame . . . and a disposition to match it. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 2; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Crusade 
1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Worcester Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at High School of Commerce 
Worcester, Mass. 




Anthony Nicholas Tomasiello 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

14 Merrifield Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Connoisseur of languages and food . . . with an 
amazing capacity for both . . . dynamite at the table 
or on Le Croise . . . "Tony" won our admiration in 
freshman year by out-arguing the "Fitchburg farmers" 
in two different languages and three or four assorted 
dialects . . . trudged up the Hill for struggles with 
the football squad "just to work up an appetite" . . . 
never had the opportunity to show his wares in a real 
game . . . but always ready, willing and able . . . 
gobbles up French as he does spaghetti . . . strangely 



serious (for Tony) with his studies of la langue de la 
belle, etc. . . . one of the few students in freshman 
who found out for himself what happened to Cyrano 
de Bergerac . . . knew all the angles downtown . . . 
election time would find him putting the "right man" 
in Worcester's City Hall ... a future French teacher 
who knows quite a bit that isn't in the books ... if 
he makes his class work as hard as he did, he may not 
be liked . . . but that won't faze Tony . . .he's out 
to do a good job. 




Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 1, 2 ; 
Aquinas Circle 4; History Academy 1, 
2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Knights of Columbus 1, 2; Italian Acad- 
emy 1, 2, 3, 4; Labor Academy 1, 2, 3, 
4; Hartford Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Cheshire Academy 
Cheshire, Conn. 



r a n c 1 s 



Ho 



ceo T ii iii ;i :; i i! I I ii 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

49 Yale Parkway 
Meriden, Conn. 



The barber of the Hill . . . Frank's shop was always 
crowded with student customers . . . kept many a 
Purple football hero in good trim . . . Typical of his 
trade . . . dexterous worker . . . seldom at a loss 
for words . . . talked and gestured excitedly about 
war, big business, and next year's football prospects 
. . . Effervescent Frank ... a wonderful tonic for 
the blues . . . his only worry was the draft . . . 
caused him and roommate "Chuck" no end of despair 
. . . but it did not last long . . . Knew how to be 



serious at the right times . . . industrious and am- 
bitious . . . humble about his ability in studies, but 
quietly gained himself a worthy record . . . Took 
time out on Saturday nights to enjoy festivities at the 
Eden with "Chuck" and the gang . . . whom he 
amused with clever imitations of certain profs . . . 
Lively intramuralite . . . member of the Italian 
Academy . . . Hair-cutting is only a sideline . . . 
plans to enter the business field . . . where he should 
go far . . . this jovial boy from Meriden. 



Irish Cultural Academy 1 ; Yacht Club 
2 ; Class Secretary 2 ; Tennis 2 ; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Purple Key 1, 
2, 3, 4; Outing Club 2; Glee Club 1; 
Albany Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Mary's Academy 
Amsterdam, N. Y. 




R 



l c h a r 



d E. T 



uroer 



ACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

4 Trinity Place 
Amsterdam, N. Y. 



"Dick" . . . the fellow who started the "V" cam- 
paign . . . with his hairline . . . looks very, very 
serious, if you don't know him . . . then you know 
that he's chuckling silently . . . popular and familiar 
Purple Keyman since freshman year . . . tall, hand- 
some and assured . . . the carefree cosmopolite . . . 
burned the candle at both ends . . . Russell Sage 
and Lasell . . . popular week-ender in Boston and 
environs . . . was never on the losing end of a battle 
of wits . . . Beat Collier's Campus Fashions by weeks 
... we knew summer was near when Dick blossomed 
(or unblossomed) in a crew cut ... on him it looked 



good . . . while no pupil of Bernarr McFadden, he 
handled himself well in the physical line . . . quite 
a "flash" in intramural basketball . . . and an ex- 
cellent net-player in tennis . . . into the net . . . 
His life wasn't all play, however . . . "Dick" man- 
aged to squeeze in some studying ... a good enough 
amount to rank him high in Economics . . . learned 
quickly . . . and retained it . . . Organized well . . . 
kept things going on the Syracuse and B. C. week-ends 
. . . learned broadcasting technique from Station MON 
. . . He'll show them how it's done. 




Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 
4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Worcester Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Oxford High School 
Oxford, Mass. 



Roger F. Vancour 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Maple Avenue 
North Oxford, Mass. 



With quiet, unassuming manner, Roger upheld the 
hard-working tradition of physics students at the Cross 
. . . his conscientiousness won the admiration of stu- 
dents and professors alike . . . Came to the big city 
from North Oxford each morning . . . Roj brought 
a mathematical wizardry with him . . . soon became 
a feature of the physics department . . . long hours in 
the lab never seemed to bother him . . . established 
authority on facts and figures . . . became Dr. Basch's 
protege ... or was it vice -versa? . . . Showed the 



chem students a thing or two about their major . . . 
Kiely and Polachi couldn't get over it . . . Regular 
Sodalist . . . active member of the Scientific Society 
. . . accomplished musician . . . seen on Fitton every 
football Saturday . . . doing his bit to supply color 
for the "great Sport" . . . Quite a baseball player too 
. . . starred in high school ball . . . cousin and 
favorite fan of the Braves' Al Javery . . . Proud of 
his French heritage . . . Roj will make his future work 
in mathematics look like first grade arithmetic. 



History Academy 3, 4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; 
Lowell Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Howe High School 
Billerica, Mass. 




Ernest T. VdcbII 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Boston Road 
Billerica, Mass. 



His name was "Ernie" . . . throughout four years 
the intrepid man who dared to call him that was never 
found . . . No giant, Buster's size belied his strength 
. . . Working in his father's garage gave him the 
strongest pair of wrists in the class . . . woe betide 
the unwary underclassman who shook hands with our 
Hercules . . . Ran the opposition ragged in all 
intramural sports . . . there wasn't a hole so small 
that he couldn't squeeze through . . . Loquacious, but 
never bragged . . . Knew sports so intimately that 



he gave the impression he invented them . . . another 
authority on batting averages and percentages of all 
kinds . . . Would bet on anything and everything 
. . . and seldom lost . . . "canny" was Buster's 
middle name . . . Rivaled Ray Ghelardi as possessor 
of the highest-pitched laugh in the class ... it was 
heard continuously . . . "Little Buster" ... a bad 
man to tangle with, but a valuable friend at all times 
. . . our self-reliant dynamo . . . excitable and ever 
invigorating Buster. 




Intramural Debating 1, 2; Aquinas Cir- 
cle 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; La- 
bor Academy 1, 2; Boston Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Prepared at Belmont High School 
Belmont, Mass. 



Edward Joseph Walsh 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

51 Brattle Street 
Cambridge, Mass. 



Introducing "Big Ed" from Belmont ... a quiet 
fellow . . . amazed all by infrequent displays of hidden 
talent . . . Promoted and produced, with roomie Bob 
Burns, the highly publicized match between "Demon 
Dan" and "The Mouse" . . . Showed his great love 
for flying in junior year . . . staged a hedge-hopping 
show for the boys in Beaven . . . Once stayed on the 
Hill for a week-end so that his prefect might distinguish 
him from his roommate . . . His "Beantown Express" 
carried many to Boston on Saturdays before the pro- 
scription on gas and tires . . . one of those decorated 



for bravery in the Battle of Beaven . . . probably the 
No. 1 welder in the class . . . Business major . . . 
in senior year decided to acquire some practical ex- 
perience . . . especially among Freshmen . . . ex- 
ecuted many important enterprises with Tom Shea . . . 
initiated Bill Whelan into their circle in November 
. . . Always interested in Mike McGrath's welfare . . . 
need we say he did his job well? . . . Au revoir, Ed 
. . . you were a man worth knowing ... a friend 
worth having. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; 
French Academy 1, 2; Fitchburg Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at St. Bernard's High School 
Fitchburg, Mass. 




Joseph Patrick Walsh 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

126 Lawrence Street 
Fitchburg, Mass. 



The most scholarly gentleman from Fitchburg . . . 
Section A . . . Dean's Lister for four years without 
a miss ... a tireless worker who was well rewarded for 
his efforts . . . Flying Fortress . . . Joe ordinarily quiet 
. . . but violent in informal "caf" debates . . . Long 
recognized as supreme court of appeal in all cafeteria dis- 
putes . . . speaks ex cathedra on matters philosophic 
. . . analytic thinker who found a world of meaning 
in every thesis . . . threatened many times to edit his 
own text ... A sharp-witted and talented story teller 



. . . Exponent of the Fitton Field Blitz . . . hammered 
and pounded his way all over the stands on a Saturday 
afternoon ... a dangerous man to sit with . . . 
Veteran Sodalist . . . Minstrel man, harmony singer, 
and banjo plucker . . . likes Bing Crosby and Amer- 
ican literature . . . fast becoming an authority on the 
latter . . . writes short stories and essays himself 
. . . handles masterfully a score of themes . . . our 
John Kieran — who will return to college as a professor. 




Sodality 1, 2, 4; Intramural Debating 
1; Purple Patcher 4; Tomahawk 1, 
2, 3, 4, News Editor 3, 4; Aquinas Cir- 
cle 4; Cross and Scroll 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 4 ; Camera Club 1 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Society 3; 
Philharmonic 3, 4; Band 3, 4; Choir 2, 
3; German Academy 1, 2, 4; Metro- 
politan Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Brooklyn Preparatory 

School 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



William Paul Whelan, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

1060 Ocean Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Castor to M. F, C.'s Pollux . . . Bill read Cosmopolitan 
at four and ever since has been . . . has the Brooklyn 
gnosis and will defend it anywhere . . . hepcat of note 
. . . had to listen to classical records for three hours 
in freshman year when Father Martin barred the door 
. . . Wrote two songs but modestly refused to publish 
. . . always kissed his clarinet good night . . . 
Financial wizard . . . atomic chemist . . . worried 
for a while about Aristotle's theory of motion but 
very rarely about anything else . . . Got more sleep 
before exams than anyone else in the class . . . and 



still found time to turn out headlines with personality 
for the Tomahaivk . . . Promotion man for Manhattan 
Beach . . . Willie was unexcelled at the wheel of a 
car — especially Tom O' Boyle's . . . Made cocoa every 
night for a while in Carlin and considered sleeping 
on the floor . . . had a famous feud with "Papa" 
Stanard . . . Bill won . . . Combustion expert in 
chem lab, but gave up smoking in senior . . . gestures 
confidently, just as he plays tennis, softball, and ping- 
pong . . . When better Brooklyns are built, Bill will 
build them. 



Sodality 1, 2; B. J. F. 3, 4; Intramural 
Debating 1, 2; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Soci- 
ety 2 ; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3, 4; French 
Academy 1, 2 ; Labor Academy 1, 2, 3, 
4; Boston Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Melrose High School 
Melrose, Mass. 




William Daniel Whitney 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

124 Bellevue Avenue 
Melrose. Mass. 



Friendly, cheerful Bill ... a likeable chap from the 
start . . . wholehearted in all his endeavors . . . 
always in the thick of classroom discussions . . . 
Devil's Advocate . . . ever broaching a knotty question 
... a financier par excellence . . . always found a 
way to make money during vacations . . . Generous 
Bill . . . supplied indigent friends with "Wm. D. 
Whitney Co." rulers and blotters . . . Engineered 
several successful expeditions to New York, New 
Hampshire, and Washington ... as well as frequent 
trips to the Wellesley campus . . . Conscientious and 



enthusiastic trackman since freshman year . . . Laborite 
. . . authority on real estate . . . followed the 
march of time . . . B. J. F. stalwart on the rostrum 
and over the air waves . . . Spent his summers 
handling fifty youngsters as caddy master at Mt. 
Washington Hotel . . . fell asleep at the oddest times 
of day . . . constantly kidded about his broad "A" 
. . . clean-cut, trustworthy, dependable ... his 
rugged frame will look well in an Ensign's uniform 
. . . here's wishing you smooth sailing, Bill. 




Tomahawk 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 1; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Sanctuary Soci- 
ety 1, 2, 3, 4; French Academy 1, 2; 
Brockton Club 1, 2, 3, President 4. 

Prepared at Brockton High School 
Brockton, Mass. 



John J. Williams, Jr 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

263 Green Street 
Brockton, Mass. 



Music-loving John . . . our greatest exponent of the 
trends in swing . . . would make a grand band man- 
ager . . . because of his sincere interest in both 
"sweet" and "solid" . . . Trudged up Linden Lane 
from Brockton along with Gilmore and Gilmartin 
. . . roomed with the latter until his departure for 
the priesthood . . . One of Jack Swords' most faithful 
in the refereeing racket . . . always in demand for 
the big intramural games . . . Spent his summers 
pleasantly teaching tennis and playing it . . . im- 



proved phenomenally during his four years ... a 
member of the championship Wheeler IV team . . . 
nearly as famous on the hardwood . . . but for a 
different reason ... his basket for the opposing side 
while playing for Beaven III still causes him anguish 
. . . Anxious to get in the scrap after graduation . . . 
Knew all his classmates intimately . . . many in the 
other classes too . . . Taught the Westerners the 
Brockton dialect at its best . . . before long he was 
"Jawn" to them too. 



Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3, 4; Purple Key 4; Philharmonic 1, 2, 
3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Worcester Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at South High School 
Worcester, Mass. 




Walter Francis Winchester 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

16 Holland Road 
Worcester, Mass. 



Curly-haired . . . laughing . . . happy-go-lucky . . . 
that's Walt . . . Athletic to the core . . . plays 
baseball, basketball, and football . . . guided the for- 
tunes of Worcester '43 on the diamond . . . capable 
infielder and hitter ... A bowler of high repute 
both at school and in Worcester . . . usually won, but 
knew how to lose . . . An embryonic Gene Krupa 
. . . really went to town on the hides . . . boosted 
the Cavaliers as "the best band around town" . . . 
which was only natural . . . his own outfit . . . 



percussion artist for the Crusaders and Philharmonic 
in Sophomore Year . . . Economics major ... a 
student whose popularity was recognized by his ap- 
pointment to the Purple Key . . . Staunch member of 
the Worcester Club and Sodality . . . when he didn't 
take his drums to a dance, it was a girl . . . never 
worried . . . "whatever happens, happens for the best" 
. . . Alphabetically almost last on the long list of 
seniors . . . but will be among first to succeed. 




Intramural Debating 2 ; Scientific Soci- 
ety 2, 3, 4; Aquinas Circle 4; Intramural 
Sports 2, 3, 4; Brockton Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Prepared at Coyle High School 
Taunton, Mass. 



Robert Francis Wright 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

81 Bartlett Street 
Brockton, Mass. 



Presenting the only man in the class who could legally 
claim he was never "Wrong" . . . Bob found it 
"relaxing" to gaze for hours through a microscope . . . 
claimed he never saw the sun set over Mt. St. James 
because of long lab hours . . . Made the Dean's List 
in Junior year ... no mean feat in the tough pre-med 
course . . . Dreaded oversleeping . . . "Wake me up, 
will you? I've got to go to class" . . . Adept at 
straightening out difficulties with Fr. Reed . . . had 
an incredible love for railroad cars . . . but detested 
crossword puzzles and some people's devotion to them 



. . . Eagle-eyed ballhawk in intramurals . . . often 
found on the courts below Carlin . . . An unrelenting 
adversary in an argument . . . tried unsuccessfully to 
reform his roommates' dearly beloved opinions . . . 
Master of Ceremonies for the eleven o'clock Shower 
Room Quartet and Debating Society . . . member of 
the Contract Bridge Terrors of Wheeler I . . . fond 
of reading and sleeping . . . friendly, agreeable Bob 
. . . firm in his convictions . . . he'll be a good 
doctor. 



EX-MEM - CLASS DF 1943 



Argento, Philip James 
Ash, Herbert Edward, Jr. 
Becker, Roger William 
Beecher, Matthew Joseph 
Bilodeau, Arthur Joseph 
Boyle, William Francis 
Brantl, George Edward 
Bresnahan, John Cornelius 
Brosnahan, John Joseph, Jr. 
Buckley, Richard Cornelius 
Burns, Robert Francis, Jr. 
Cahill, Edward Joseph 
Cairns, Joseph Edward 
Calabrese, Frank P. 
Calvelli, George Joseph, Jr. 
Canarie, James David 
Carr, Edwin Francis, Jr. 
Cavanaugh, Walter Peter 
Collagan, William Thomas 
Connolly, Richard Edward 
Connor, Robert Joseph 
Conroy, Stephen Joseph 
Corrigan, Douglas Ernest 
Costigan, William Keane 
Couillard, Edward Joseph 
Cronin, James Edward 
Cronin, Paul Leonard 
Croteau, Andre Bernardin 
Cull, William Justin 
Cullum, Francis Joseph 
Dailey, Edward Joseph, Jr. 
DeAngelis, Albert Paul 
Derby, Charles Garrett 
Dobbyn, Richard Joseph, Jr. 
Doherty, William Paul 
Donato, John Francis 
Donnelly, Richard Vincent 
Donohue, John Joseph 
Dooley, James Joseph 



22 Longfellow Rd., Worcester, Mass. 

11 Duxbury Rd., Worcester, Mass. 

230 Wyoming Ave., South Orange, N. J. 

182 North Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 

104 Hollis Ave., Quincy, Mass. 

358 Commonwealth Ave., New Britain, Conn. 

1153 Julia St., West Englewood, N. J. 

218 Bailey St., Lawrence, Mass. 

85 Winter St., Keene, N. H. 

1 Dewey Ave., Piercefield, N. Y. 
108 Highland Ave., Fitchburg, Mass. 
20 Church St., Peabody, Mass. 

14 Nowell Ave., Melrose, Mass. 

16 Conduit St., Lawrence, Mass. 
1361 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

19 Sixth Ave., Haverhill, Mass. 

25 Wawecus Rd., Worcester, Mass. 

38 Ridge Rd., Milton, Mass. 

17 Elihu St., Hamden, Conn. 
4518 Ovid Ave., Des Moines, la. 
201 Wellesley Rd., Syracuse, N. Y. 
57 Bagley St., Central Falls, R. I. 

39 Stella Rd., Belmont, Mass. 
5235 Lindell Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
Main St., Northbridge, Mass. 

47 Jacques Ave., Worcester, Mass. 

12 Magnolia St., Arlington, Mass. 
9 Church St., Chisholm, Me. 

17406 Nottingham Rd., Cleveland, O. 
3961 Hudson Blvd., North Bergen, N. J. 
12 Benton Rd., Somerville, Mass. 
17 Prentice St., Worcester, Mass. 
133 Malvern Rd., Worcester, Mass. 
91 Claymoss Rd., Brighton, Mass. 
Staatsburg, N. Y. 
7318 17th Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

20 Abbott St., Worcester, Mass. 

2 Bedford Ave., Worcester, Mass. 
83 Booth Ave., Englewood, N. J. 



EX-ME1V - CLASS OF 1943 



Dooley, Richard Aloysius, Jr. 
Doyle, Daniel Albert, Jr. 
Driscoll, John Charles 
Driscoll, Paul Edward 
Duncan, Robert Joseph 
Dyer, Joseph Edwin, Jr. 
Egan, John Francis 
Elliott, Richard Heman 
Esper, Amen, Jr. 
Fallon, John Joseph 
Fazio, Thomas Francis 
Finn, Edward James, Jr. 
Finnigan, Thomas Edward 
FitzGerald, Thomas David 
Fitzgibbons, Francis John 
Flavin, Joseph Francis 
Foley, John Paul 
Foley, Robert Ewing 
Gagnon, Donald George 
Gahagan, John Francis 
Gallagher, Daniel Augustine 
Garamella, Joseph John 
Gendron, Edwin Arnold 
Ghent, John William, Jr. 
Gill, William Joseph 
Gilmartin, Daniel James 
Gintowt, Walter Zigmond 
Gourley, Francis Xavier 
Graham, Arthur Murphy 
Granfield, John Kyne 
Greaney, Paul Joseph 
Greene, John William 
Gunn, Edward Robert 
Haddad, Edward Nicholas 
Hanrahan, John David 
Hanrahan, John Joseph 
Harrington, John Francis 
Harty, Thaddeus James, Jr. 
Hedges, Edmund Henry, Jr. 



36 Worcester St., Grafton, Mass. 

Brookline, N. H. 

25 Winthrop Rd., Lexington, Mass. 

47 Culvert St., Torrington, Conn. 

801 Seventh St., LaSalle, 111. 

4615 Langdrum Lane, Chevy Chase, Md. 

173 Fairmont Ave., Worcester, Mass. 

22 Walnut St., Manchester, N. H. 

440 Grafton St., Worcester, Mass. 

40 Green St., Woburn, Mass. 

130 Summit St., Clinton, Mass. 

64 Nottingham Ter., Waterbury, Conn. 

118 Bishop St., New Haven, Conn. 

30 Glen Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

92 Market St., Amsterdam, N. Y. 

11 Zabelle Ave., Auburn, Mass. 

108 Birch St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

2 Wilbur St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Gay St., North Chelmsford, Mass. 

Sarah Wells Trail, Goshen, N. Y. 

19 Buttonwood Lane, Peabody, Mass. 

411 Exeter St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

154 Brooklawn Court, New Bedford, Mass. 

114 Garfield Rd., West Hartford, Conn. 

171 Stevens Ave., Portland, Me. 

94 Florance St., Brockton, Mass. 

87 Sunapee St., Newport, N. H. 

85 Dale St., Roxbury, Mass. 

11 Irving Rd., Waban, Mass. 

42 Melba Ave., Springfield, Mass. 

11 Wawecus Rd., Worcester, Mass. 

Pleasant St., Barre, Mass. 

158 Clifton Ave., West Hartford, Conn. 

113 Fairmont Ave., Worcester, Mass. 

78 South Main St., Rutland, Vt. 

505 North Brandywine Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. 

7 Morton Ave., Newport, R. I. 

64 Ward Place, Hartford, Conn. 

1312 Lakewood Ave., Lima, O. 



EX-MEN - ELASS DF 1943 



Henley, Robert Joseph 
Hennessey, Edward Joseph, Jr. 
Herlihy, John Mason 
Hines, Francis Xavier 
Hines, William Francis 
Hoar, Thomas Eugene 
Holley, Kenneth Joseph 
Howes, Richard John 
Johnson, Edward Thomas 
Kane, Paul Vincent 
Kain, John Francis 
Kane, Martin John, Jr. 
Kearney, John Francis, Jr. 
Keef, James Clement 
Kiernan, Francis William 
Kilfoyle, Thomas Edward 
Klasoskus, Albin Anthony 
Kramer, George Thomas 
Lahey, William Francis 
Lang, Harold Francis, Jr. 
Langan, Joseph George, Jr. 
LaRosa, Vincent Stephen 
Lavin, Philip Vincent 
Leach, George Arthur, Jr. 
Lore, John Marion, Jr. 
Louis, Robert Abraham 
Lucid, James Ryan 
Lufrano, Louis Thomas, Jr. 
Lynch, John Francis 
Lynch, Raymond Francis 
Mackin, Francis Charles 
Marcorelle, Edward Joseph, Jr. 
Markham, James Joseph 
Martin, Henry Francis 
Masterson, Robert Bernard, Jr. 
Mathias, Paul Edwin 
Meehan, John Francis 
Mion, John Joseph 
Miranda, Gaetano Frank 



20 Prentiss Lane, Belmont, Mass. 

Academy Hill, Stratford, Conn. 

48 Windsor Rd., Milton, Mass. 

33 George St., Newton, Mass. 

27 James St., Pittston, Pa. 

129 Burncoat St., Worcester, Mass. (now Class of '44) 

12 Irving St., Hartford, Conn. 
Upland Rd., Southboro, Mass. 
133 Clyde St., Brookline, Mass. 
83 Charlotte St., Worcester, Mass. 
Box 167, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone 
2033 Powell Ave., New York, N. Y. 

51 Fort Hill Circle, New Brighton, N. Y. 

22 Ohio St., Bangor, Me. 

44 Prospect St., Lowell, Mass. 

13 Messervy St., Salem, Mass. 
108 Franklin St., Meriden, Conn. 
4325 Wooster Rd., Cleveland, O. 
65 Brownell St., Worcester, Mass. 

35 Albion Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

94 Paulin Blvd., Leonia, N. J. 

8567 79th St., Woodhaven, N. Y. 

777 Pleasant St., Worcester, Mass. 

9 Grafton St., Wakefield, Mass. 

4704 Delafield Ave., New York, N. Y. 

51 Houghton St., Worcester, Mass. 

20 Lewis Ave., Batavia, N. Y. (now Class of '44) 

2411 33rd St., Long Island City, N. Y. 

204 Perry Ave., Worcester, Mass. 

Highland Ave., Andover, Mass. 

25 Grant Ave., Newton, Mass. 

Lord Square, Ipswich, Mass. 

183 Liberty St., Lowell, Mass. 

13 Vernon St., Worcester, Mass. 

258 Lagrange St., West Roxbury, Mass. (now Class of '44) 

38 Bayway Ave., Brightwaters, N. Y. 

South St., Goshen, N. Y. 

174 The Prada, Atlanta, Ga. 

262 James St., New Haven, Conn. 



EX-MEN - CLASS DF 1943 



Mitchell, John Edmund 
Molloy, Robert James 
Moltenbrey, George Donald 
Moore, William Patrick 
Moran, John James 
Morris, Donald Paul 
Moynagh, John Richard, Jr. 
Mudd, Joseph Francis Gerard 
Mullaney, William David, Jr. 
Murphy, Joseph Mary 
Murphy, Patrick Francis, Jr. 
Musco, Angelo Theodore 
McCann, William James, Jr. 
McDermott, Richard Michael 
McGlone, Robert James 
McGrady, Paul Gregory 
Mclntyre, Austin Augustine 
McNulty, John Joseph, Jr. 
McQuade, Charles Molloy 
Nugent, James Francis, Jr. 
O'Brien, John William 
O'Brien, Mortimer Charles, Jr. 
O'Connell, Eugene Francis 
O'Connell, John Daniel, Jr. 
O'Connor, Edmund Francis 
Oliverio, William James 
O'Malley, Edward Terrence 
O'Malley, John Egan 
O'Neil, Ralph Michael 
Osachuk, Leom Michael 
O'Shaughnessy, Edward Joseph, Jr 
Pacosa, Alphonse Stanley 
Pender, Edward James 
Piehler, John Andrew 
Pierson, Harry Warner 
Power, William Paul 
Quinn, John Richard 
Quish, William Philip, Jr. 
Reardon, William Robert 



53 Rossmore Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 
163 Jerome Ave., Auburn, Mass. 
Pleasant St., Huntington, Mass. 
121 West 9th St., Erie, Pa. 
209 Ingleside Ave., Worcester, Mass. 

9 Nassau Rd., Larchmont, N. Y. 

69 Piedmont St., Worcester, Mass. (now Class of '46) 
6918 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

27 Gates St., Worcester, Mass. 

151 Homeward Ave., Uxbridge, Mass. 

118 Cory Rd., Brighton, Mass. 

21 Miller St., New Haven, Conn. 

59 Eastchester Rd., New Rochelle, N. Y. 

37-21 88th St., Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

28 North St., Portland, Me. 

149 Central St., Auburn, Mass. 
46 Myrtle St., Portland, Me. 

147 Hudson Ave., Green Island, N. Y. 

116 Banks St., Lowell, Mass. 

184 Beach 131 St., Belle Harbor, N. Y. 

76 Upsala St., Worcester, Mass. (now Class of '44) 

150 Old Mamaronek Rd., White Plains, N. Y. 
254 Marian St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

10 Oak St., Ayer, Mass. 

177 Charles St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

18 Trowbridge St., Arlington, Mass. 

41 Oak Ave., Worcester, Mass. 

130 Housatonic St., Lee, Mass. 

17640 South Woodland Rd., Shaker Heights, O. 

9 Goodrich Court, Milford, Mass. 
45 Phelps Rd., Ridgewood, N. J. 

10 Boylston St., Easthampton, Mass. 

14 Charles St., Pittsfield, Mass. 
4 Villa St., Rochester, N. Y. 
1806 Eddy St., Chicago, 111. 

4 Einhorn Rd., Worcester, Mass. 

15 Glendale Rd., Quincy, Mass. 

225 Main St., Manchester, Conn, (now Class of '44) 
61 Fairfield St., Worcester, Mass. 



EX-MEM - CLASS DF 1943 



Regan, Martin Joseph, Jr. 
Reilly, Thomas Mulcare 
Reinders, Erik Cornel 
Riedy, Thomas Francis, Jr. 
Ring, Robert Donald 
Roberts, Walter Campbell 
Roth, George Stuart, Jr. 
Rupelli, Raymond Paul 
Ryan, Francis Joseph, Jr. 
Ryan, Robert Emerel 
Schneider, Warren Louis 
Scola, John Enrico 
Scott, Robert Titus 
Shanaphy, Joseph Francis 
Shea, Roger McKenna 
Smith, Edward Patrick, Jr. 
Sordi, Nicholas Anthony 
Spaeth, Louis Otto 
Spellman, Arthur Lawrence 
SpofFord, Karl Edward 
Stafford, Robert Hammond, Jr. 
Sullivan, Andrew Joseph, Jr. 
Sweeney, Frederick Joseph 
Tabb, James Patrick 
Tierney, George Augustine, Jr. 
Tirrell, Ralph, Jr. 
Towle, Matthew Henry 
Trombetta, Joseph Francis 
Tronti, Biagio Joseph 
Tyksinski, Edward Frederick 
Veydovec, Robert Edward 
Weir, John Emmett 
Willis, Stephen John 



Wesskum Wood Rd., Old Greenwich, Conn. 

238 East Main St., North Adams, Mass. 

333 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

847 New Scotland Ave., Albany, N. Y. 

22 Columbia Park, Haverhill, Mass. 

61 Pleasant St., North Andover, Mass. 

229 Robineau Rd., Syracuse, N. Y. 

1529 72 St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

2508 15th St., Troy, N Y. 

143 Murray Ave., Worcester, Mass. 

21 60 Edgemere Drive, Rochester, N. Y. 

30 Houghton St., Worcester, Mass. 

222 Wyoming Ave., South Orange, N. J. 

116 Woodside Ave., Ridgewood, N. J. 

105 South Main St., Orange, Mass. 

2409 Roslyn Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

53 Audrey Ave., Oyster Bay, N. Y. 

720 East Locust St., Davenport, la. 

26 Wildwood Rd., Milton, Mass. 

154 Corinth St., North Adams, Mass. 

135 High St., Dalton, Mass. 

113 Dorchester St., Worcester, Mass. 

639 Central Ave., Dunkirk, N. Y. 

11 Drew Court, Springfield, Mass. 

149 Spring St., Middletown, Conn. 

95 President's Lane, Quincy, Mass. 

10 Blaisdell Ter., Lynn, Mass. 

2300 Laconia Ave., New York, N. Y. 

18 Mylod St., Norwood, Mass. 

706 South James St., Rome, N. Y. 

186 Prospect Ave., Bayonne, N. J. 

24 Park St., Tupper Lake, N. Y. 

321 Maitland Ave., West Englewood, N. J. 



NDERCLASSMEN 



The life of an undergraduate 
has changed since those early 
years when Worcester was a city 
of ten thousand. Those were the 
days when only seniors wore silk 
hats, when recreation teas a ten- 
mile row on Quinsigamond or a 
walk to Mt. Wacbusett. when as- 
tronomy and geology were on the 
curriculum. But truth does not 
change: the ideals of those first 
men of Holy Cross are the same 
which inspire her centennial sons. 





CROSS CE* 1 ^ 



Unlike the Juniors of past years, the men of '44 
had the intricacies, the pitfalls, and the labyrinthine 
dangers of philosophy thrust suddenly upon them. 
Unlike their predecessors, they did not have a long 
summer vacation in which to accustom themselves to 
the idea of being dignified Juniors. On May 7th, 
one week after completing their sophomore year, 
their fifth semester burst in upon them. But al- 
though they were fully conscious of Holy Cross 
tradition and custom in all branches of activity, 
spiritual, cultural and athletic, they were not so 
chained to the past that they could not adjust them- 
selves to the exigencies of a national emergency; the 
demands of the armed forces, jumbled semesters, 
earlier classes, earlier Masses, no gas, rationed coffee, 
and especially no holidays. 

They felt, at the start of that third year, that 
they were well on their way to becoming educated 
men. Consequently, they began to specialize so 
that they would be able, perhaps, to make a living. 
But they saw that the Seniors were panting under 
the heavy load of their exceptionally weighty books, 
so they decided that this year they would have to 
play a leading role in the extra-curricular activities 
of the Cross. 

Fr. Moran, S.J., Fr. Hutchinson, S.J., Fr. Quane, 
S.J., and Fr. Glavin, S.J. were the first to tell them 



JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 




Walter E. Hoar 
President 



John J. Leary 
Vice-President 



Juniors 



CLASS DF 1944 



about syllogisms and ideas, those little factors that 
were to cause so much trouble. Every class became 
even more vital because there were fewer of them. 

Baseball was the first sport in which men of '44 
participated as Juniors. Ray Milner, Harper Gerry, 
Buster Mills and Red Sliney were the varsity regulars 
during that hectic spring. But when it came to 
intramural baseball, we really were tops ; for two 
Junior teams, Carlin IIIA and Carlin IIIB were 
champions in their respective leagues. 

Then on July 2nd, we started hustling home for 
our short, blissful summer vacation. Most of our 
time was spent explaining to people how we had 
completed two and one quarter years of college in 
two years, (or had we?). Carlin Hall had been 
so convenient and had endeared itself so much to us 
that on our return we decided to bunk once more 
under its Worcester Georgian roof. We had be- 
come too accustomed to peering anxiously at Kimball 
Hall before meal time and shouting the heroic cry, 
"They're going in," to move to distant Beaven. 

Fall found most of the fellows back with little 
cards showing that they were in one of the military 
reserves. However, one out of every ten had left 
school for active duty with the armed forces. Five 
entered the Navy Air force and five the Army Air 
Corps. Some were in the Marines, the Navy, the 
Coast Guard, the infantry, the motorized units, the 
paratroops, and almost every other conceivable unit. 
Among those already on active duty are Tom Burke, 
Ernest Duhaime, Jim Middleton, Fritz Barzilauskas, 
John Sullivan, Jack Donnelly, George Alietta, Char- 
lie Carr, Lou Scerra, Jim Sheehan, Ed Carr, John 
Nolan, John Allen, Tom Cawley, Frank Delaney, 



Paul Friel, Joe Monahan, Jim Ryan, Jim O'Brien, 
Walt Driscoll, Bob Fisher, and John Collins. 

The year has also been generous in lives devoted 
entirely to God. The most prominent of all to begin 
studies for the priesthood was Ed McGrath, the 
outstanding president of the class of '44. Others 
who have entered various community and secular 
seminaries are Robert Hoey, Bill Masterson, Richard 
Brackett, Tom Morris, Frank Prout, Don O'Brien, 
Fred McManus, Frank O'Sullivan, Tom Casey, Jack 
McNally, Hugh Reilly, Jack Kinkle, Jack Clancy, 
and John Cummings. 

When we became Juniors, we were at long last 
eligible for the B. J. F., and about twenty-five of 
us were selected for membership. Later in the year 
ten of them were elected to the varsity team. They 
were Jim Fee, Bob Schlitt, "Reb" Hewitt, Don Mark- 
ham, Ed Browne, Dick Moynihan, Paul Cronin, Joe 
Keegan, Tom Sullivan, and John Morgan. 

The forty-sixth varsity football team took the field 
when the class of '44 returned from their vacation. 
Twelve of our number found that they held varsity 
berths. George Titus was in there at center, as was 
Chester Yablonski. Walt Hoar played a terrific 
guard until incapacitated by an injury. Manning the 
line were Mel Downey, Broni Macy, and Bob Law- 
son; while the boys who carried that ball for plenty 
of yardage were Dick Gibson, Danny Weitekamp, 
Steve Murphy, "Red" Sliney, Chet Wasilewski and 
Lou Celentano. 

When the Purple Netmen take to the boards you 
can count on Bob Nolan, Steve Murphy, Ray Milner 
and Bill Pisarra to be right in there, sinking basket 
after basket for the Crusaders. Joe Mallahan and 
Paul Hines are the speediest boys in the year and 
are pounding the boards and the cinders with the 
track team; while big Chet Lakomski kept himself 
busy hurling the shot and assorted discs. 

The Purple Key drew much of its strength from 
the junior class with Joe Keegan, Jack Fitzgerald, 
Marty McCue, Basil Kane and Charlie Trebbe filling 



important posts and keeping rallies and various drives 
humming. 

The Tomahawk was filled with contributions from 
the Juniors. Ray Cooney, Bill Cullen, Ken Sullivan, 
John Morgan, Paul Murray and Joe Garland all 
having columns and emulating the Peglers and 
Cunninghams. Others on the staff who wrote val- 
uable and interesting features and news articles were 
Joe Keegan, Marty McCue, Joe Condron, and Dick 
Moynihan. Moynihan showed his versatility by 
also being editor-in-chief of Le Croise. 

Every activity on the Hill found Juniors in prom- 
inent positions. The Sodality had many devoted 
members; the Mission Crusade, the Sanctuary So- 
ciety, the Purple, the History Academy, the Cross 
and Scroll, the Scientific Society, the Glee Club . . . 

This is what the class of '44 has done. When 
viewed with a cold analytic eye, these may seem to be 
rather mediocre achievements: it may appear to be 
just another junior class. But if you consider the 
background of war against which the year unfolded, 
the class of '44 may perhaps be considered excep- 
tional. Dread uncertainty stalked every day of it; 
no one knew what the future held for him; no one 
knew if he would ever be a Senior. But everyone 
was always ready and everyone did his share. 

Joseph Garland. Jr. 

JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 







Robert J. Nolan 
Treasurer 



Joseph J. Mallahan 
Secretary 




JUNIOR A 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. E. M. Conan, A. J. Homicz, J. F. Barry, R. L. Biel, J. T. Grady, J. J. Cummings, Jr., Rev. David J. 
Moran, S.J., T. J. Assad, G. C. Desrochers, J. Evans, J. Garland, Jr., W. R. Moynihan, C. F. Kahler. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. 
J. E. Fitzgerald, J. W. Egan, J. P. Morgan, R. G. Davis, R. S. Phillips, E. F. Kirby, Jr., J. G. Casey, D. R. Markham, E. H. McGrath, J. E. 
Tyler, Jr., J. P. O'Donnell, L. S. Bernadotte, R. A. Driscoll, W. J. Gallagher, Jr. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. R. E. Maher, K. E. 
Sullivan, P. H. Cahill, J. J. Burke, J. L. Bolduc, J. M. Cummings, Jr., J. T. Cassidy, Jr., J. L. Decourcey, J. R. Kelly, W. P. McEniry, J. T. 
Yabroski, T. J. Sullivan, E. E. Hewitt, E. J. Comiskey. Fourth Row, left to right: Messrs. G. F. Geary, Jr., R. J. Schlitt, T. H. Driscoll, 
F. J. Harrington, P. F. Sweeney, Jr., F. M. Murray, D.'F. O'Leary, R. E. Bagley, J. W. Gahan, Jr., R. E. Maloney, T. F. Kilfoil, J. J. 

Nicholson, M. H. Colecchi, P. J. Cronin. 



JOHN JAMES ARCHIBALD, 41 Sherwood Street, Valhalla, 
N. Y. ; Section D ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Football 1 ; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1; Labor Academy 2; 
Metropolitan Club 1, 2, 3. 

THOMAS J. ASSAD, 282 Plantation Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Section A; Sodality 1, 2; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3. 

ANDREW ANTHONY ATHY, 4 King Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section D; Sodality 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Golf 
2; Knights of Columbus 1, 2, 3; Mission Crusade 1; Worces- 
ter Club 1, 2, 3. 

JAMES ANTHONY ATHY, 4 King Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Section D; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Golf 2, 3; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 1; Worcester Club 
1, 2, 3. 

EDWARD R. BAGLEY, 361 Hillside Avenue, Hartford, Conn.; 
Section A; Sodality 1, 2; Scientific Society 2, 3; Aquinas Circle 
3; Irish Cultural Academy 2, 3; History Academy 2, 3; Sanc- 
tuary Society 2, 3 ; Outing Club 3 ; Italian Academy 3 ; French 
Academy 3 ; Labor Academy 3 . 

ROBERT EMMETT BARRETT, 69 Salem End Road, Framing- 
ham, Mass.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Scientific Society 3; 
Philharmonic 1, 2; Worcester Club 1, 2. 

WILLIAM FREDERICK BARRON, 68 Mendon Street, Ux- 
bridge, Mass.; Section B; Sodality 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Philharmonic 1; Band 1, 2; Milford Club 1, 2, 3; "Crusader" 
Dance Orchestra 1. 

FRANCIS EDWARD BARRY, 5 Geneva Avenue, Lynn, Mass. ; 
Section B ; Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 1, 2 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; North Shore Club 1, 2, 3. 

JOHN F. BARRY, Jr., 193 Browning Avenue, Elizabeth N. J. ; 
Section A; Intramural Debating 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Essex Club of New Jersey 1, 2, 3- 

JOSEPH J. BARRY, Jr., 132 Newell Street, Pittsfield, Mass.; 
Section B ; Sodality 2, 3 ; History Academy 1 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1; Philharmonic 1; Band 1; 
Berkshire Club 1, 2, 3. 



PHILIP E. BEAUDOIN, 14 Claremont Avenue, Quincy, Mass.; 
Section B; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1; History 
Academy 1; Tennis 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2 ; French Academy 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 1, 2, 3. 

JOSEPH ARTHUR BELISLE, 22 Richards Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section D; Intramural Debating 2; Scientific Society 1; 
Worcester Club. 

LOUIS S. BERNADOTTE, 16235 Fair Field Avenue, Detroit, 
Mich.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2; B. J. F. 3; Intramural Debat- 
ing 2; Tomahawk 2, 3; Cross and Scroll 1, 2, 3, Secretary 3; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2. 

JOHN F. BIANCHI, 200 West Main Street, Canaan, Conn.; 
Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic 
Society 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 
3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2; Berkshire Club; 
Hartford Club. 

ROBERT LAWRENCE BIEL, 518 Woodbine Avenue, Roch- 
ester, N. Y. ; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 
1; Dramatic Society 1; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; German 
Academy 1, 2. 

ROBERT L. BOETTJER, Belmont Lake Park, Babylon, N. Y. ; 
Section D; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. 

JEAN L. BOLDUC, Waterville, Me.; Section A; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2 ; Sanctuary Society 1; French Academy 1, 2; Maine 
Club. 

JAMES BOLTON, Jr., 28 Plymouth Street, New Bedford, 
Mass.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2; Scientific Society 1, 2, 3; Yacht 
Club 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2. 

EDWARD ABRAHAM BRAUNSTEIN, 30-69 36th Street, 
Long Island City, N. Y. ; Section D; Scientific Society 1, 2, 3; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Metropolitan Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-four 



JOHN FRANCIS BRENNAN, 62 Eastview Street, Hartford, 
Conn. ; Section C ; Sodality 3 ; Intramural Debating 2 ; Irish 
Cultural Academy 2 ; History Academy 2 ; Oratorical Contest 
1 ; Tennis 2 ; Intramural Sports 3 ; Knights of Columbus 3 ; 
Choir 1 ; Mission Crusade 3 ; French Academy 3 ; Labor Acad- 
emy 3; Hartford Club; Connecticut Club. 

JOHN TEFFT BROMLEY, Upper Feeder Street, Hudson Falls, 
N. Y.; Section D; Intramural Sports 1,2,3; Albany Club. 

EDWARD RANDOLPH BROWNE, 1861 Beacon Street, 
Brookline, Mass.; Section B; Sodality 2, 3; B. J. F. 3; 
Dramatic Society 2, 3; Yacht Club 2, 3; Varsity Debating 3; 
Intramural Sports 2, 3 ; Sanctuary Society 2, 3 ; German Acad- 
emy 2, 3. 

MATTHEW J. BROWNE, 17 Second Avenue, Gloversville, 
N. Y. ; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Irish Cultural Academy 1, 2; Tennis 1, 2; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3; Outing Club 2; Labor Academy 1, 2; German Academy 

1, 2; Albany Club 1, 2, 3. 

RICHARD ALFRED BRUNO, East Douglas, Mass.; Section 
D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Scientific Society 1, 2, 3- 

CHARLES V. BRYAN, Jr., 77 Aflams Street, Rochester, N. Y. ; 
Section B ; Sodality 2 ; Intramural Sports 2, 3 ; Sanctuary Society 

2, 3; Band 2, 3; French Academy 2. 

JOHN VINCENT BUCHER, Jr., 6 Marion Avenue, Albany, 
N. Y.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; History Academy 1; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 
1,2,3; Albany Club. 

KYRN W. BULGER, 34 Waldo Road, Milton, Mass.; Section 
D; Sodality 2; Intramural Debating 2; Golf 2, 3; Intramural 
Sports 2. 

JOHN EDWARD BURGOYNE, 34 Summit Street, Clinton, 
Mass.; Section B; Sodality 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1; Fitch- 
burg Club. 

JOHN JOSEPH BURKE, 18 Sprague Street, Maiden, Mass.; 
Section A; Sodality 1 ; B. J. F. 3 ; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Irish Cultural Academy 1; Track 2, 3; Boston Club. 

WILLIAM A. BURKE, Jr., 377 Sterling Place, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Section D; Intramural Debating 2; Scientific Society 
1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Metropolitan Club 1, 2, 3. 

JOHN FRAZER BURNS, 78 Spring Park Avenue, Jamaica 
Plain, Mass.; Section B; Sodality 2, 3; Intramural Debating 
1, 2; Purple 1; Tomahawk 1, 2; Irish Cultural Academy 1; 
History Academy 1, 2, 3; Cross and Scroll 1, 2; Football 1; 
Track 1, 2; Golf 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary 
Society 1; Outing Club 1, 2, 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; Ger- 
man Academy 1, 2, Secretary-Treasurer 2 ; Boston Club. 

EDMUND JOHN BUTLER, Jr., 14 Meadow Way, Cam- 
bridge, Mass.; Section D; Sodality 1; Dramatic Society 1, 2, 3; 
Playshop 1, 2, 3; Cross and Scroll 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2 ; Labor Academy 2; Boston Club 1, 2, 3. 

DAVID JOSEPH BUTTERS, 19 Weld Avenue, Norwood, 
Mass.; Section B; Track 3. 

PHILIP R. CAHILL, 35 Crowninshield Road, Brookline, Mass.; 
Section A; Sodality 1; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Irish Cul- 
tural Academy 1, Secretary; Baseball 1; Track 3; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3 French Academy 1, 2; Boston Club. 

ROBERT EDWARD CALLAHAN, 37 Broad Street, Schuyler- 
ville, N. Y. ; Section D; Sodality 1; Scientific Society 1, 2, 3; 
Irish Cultural Academy 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
French Academy. 

JOHN WALSH CANTWELL, 5 Dearborn Avenue, North 
Providence, R. I. ; Section C ; Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 
1, 2; To?nabawk 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 1, 2. 

FRANCIS CARRIER, 23 Main Street, Blackstone, Mass.; Sec- 
tion D; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic 
Society 1, 2; Scientific Society 1, 2, 3; Yacht Club 2; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2. 



JOHN GERARD CASEY, 30 Leamington Road, Brighton 
Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2 
Scientific Society 3; Irish Cultural Academy 1, Vice-President, 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; French 
Academy 1, 2; Boston Club. 

JAMES THOMAS CASSIDY, Jr., 30 Mayfield Street, Dor- 
chester, Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debat- 
ing 1, 2; Purple Patcher 1; Yacht Club 2; Cross and Scroll 
3 ; History Academy 1 ; Intramural Sports 3 ; Sanctuary Society 
2, 3; Boston Club; German Academy 1, 2, 3, Chairman 3. 

LOUIS JOSEPH CELENTANO, 2609 Marian Avenue, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. ; Section D; Football 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3; Metropolitan Club 1, 2, 3. 

JOHN McARTHUR CLEARY, 12 School Avenue, Newport 
Vt. ; Section B ; Intramural Debating 2 ; Dramatic Society 1, 2 
Playshop 1, 2; Purple 2; Tomahawk 1; Scientific Society 1, 2 
Yacht Club 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 2; Glee Club 2, 3; Phil- 
harmonic 1 ; Choir 3. 

MARIO H. COLECCHI, 30 Pond Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. 

GEORGE VINCENT COLEMAN, 974 Smith Street, Provi- 
dence, R. I.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Intramural Debating 

1, 2; Scientific Society 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Rhode 
Island Club 1, 2, 3; German Academy 1, 2, 3. 

WILLIAM BERNARD COLLINS, 78 Vernon Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Section C; Intramural Debating 2; Irish Cultural 
Academy 1, 2; Basketball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Class 
Ring Committee 3; Mission Crusade; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3. 

JOHN BROWN COLTON, Jr., 138 June Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Mission Crusade 3; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3. 

EDWARD J. COMISKEY, Jr., Haven Street, Dover, Mass.; 
Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Boston Club 1, 2, 3; French Acad- 
emy 1, 2, 3, Librarian. 

EDWARD MOONEY CONAN, 6046 Genesee Street, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, 
2; Irish Cultural Academy 1, 2, 3; Cross and Scroll 1, 2, 3; 
Intramural Sports 1; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Knights of Colum- 
bus 1, 2; Choir 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 1, 2; Central New 
York Club 1, 2, 3. 

JOSEPH CHARLES CONDRON, 1626 Pittston Avenue, Scran- 
ton, Pa.; Section C; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic So- 
cietly 1, 2, 3; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Labor Academy 2; Pennsylvania Club 1, 2, 3. 

WALTER M. CONLIN, 20 Strathmore Road, Worcester, Mass. ; 
Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Yacht Club 3; Camera Club 3; 
Knights of Columbus 3 ; Mission Crusade 3 ; Labor Academy 
3; Worcester Club 1, 2, 3; Irish Cultural Academy 3. 

CHARLES WALKER CONNER, 35 Danner Avenue, Harrison, 
N. Y. ; Section B ; Sodality 3 ; Dramatic Society 2 ; Irish Cul- 
tural Society 1 ; Intramural Sports 3 ; Italian Academy 2 ; Met- 
ropolitan Club. 

JOSEPH ANTHONY CONNOLLY, 11 Coddington Avenue, 
North Plainfield, N. J.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; Jersey Club. 

RAYMOND EDWARD COONEY, 15-14-122 Street, College 
Point, N. Y.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2; B. J. F. 2, 3, Assistant 
Secretary of Intercollegiate Debate ; Intramural Debating 1 ; 
Dramatic Society 1, 2, 3; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3 ; Lecture Debating 

2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Sanctuary Society 2, 3; German 
Academy 3 ; Metropolitan Club. 

RAYMOND A. COTE, Spring Lake, Glendale, R. I.; Section 
C; Sodality 3; History Academy 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Mission Crusade 3 ; French Academy 2 ; Labor Academy 3- 
PAUL JOSEPH CRONIN, 120 Edmund's Road, Wellesley 
Hills, Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2; B. J. F. 3; Intramural 
Debating 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Society 1, 2, Secretary 3; Play- 
shop 1, 2, Secretary 3; Purple 1, 2, 3, Assistant Editor; Cross 
and Scroll 1, 2, 3 ; Varsity Debating 3 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3 ; Glee Club 2, 3 ; Choir 1,2,3; Riding Club 1, 2, 3 ; Boston 
Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-four 




JUNIOR B 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. J. N. O'Connor, J. M. Cleary, H. T. Gerry, C. J. Wasilewski, F. E. Barry, J. J. Mallahan, E. E. McCarthy, C. 
V. Bryan, D. J. Murphy, W. E. Hoar, W. H. Mills, Jr., W. F. Esip, Jr.,R. A. Vacca. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. J. A. Smith, Jr., J. T. 
Kinkel, C. G. Fisher, W. J. Moriarty, F. H. Lane, Jr., F. J. Loughlin, R. E. Maxwell, P. F. Beaudoin, G. J. Heroux, R. J. Monahan, R. A. 
Gibson, A. H. McCourt, W. A. Riley, R. J. Higgins, J. S. Larkin, W. L. Palmer, Jr., R. E. Cooney. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. P. L. 
McCarthy, G. T. Titus, J. J. Fee, W. J. Hanley, J. E. Fitzgerald, J. F. Burns, W. E. Manning, J. Mahoney, W. P. Quish, M. C. Saab, T. F. 
Kelly, C. W. Yablonski, C. W. Conner, M. C. Downey. Fourth Row, left to right: Messrs. P. F. McGrath, E. J. Dunn, H. A. Ozimek, G. V. 
Cooney, W. F. Barron, J. J. Barry, F. P. Lavin, J. M. Keegan, D. V. Hankinson, J. E. Burgoyne, B. S. Macy, B. W. Kaine, E. R. Browne, 

J. J. Donahue. 



WILLIAM THOMAS CULLEN, 817 Gibson Street, Scranton, 
Pa. Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural 2; Dramatic Society 
1, 2; Playshop 2; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3; History Academy 1, 2, 3; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Class Ring Committee 3; Pennsyl- 
vania Club, Secretary 1. 

JOHN M. CUMMINGS, Jr., 29 Pleasant Street, Leominster, 
Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Knights of Columbus 2, 3; Worcester Club. 

WILLIAM PAUL DALEY, 500 Esplanade, Pelham Manor, 
N. Y. ; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 2; 
Track 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; 
Metropolitan Club. 

RUSSELL DAVIS, 36 Wood Street, Hopkinton, Mass.; Sec- 
tion A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; History Academy 2, 3; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2; Worcester Club. 

JOSEPH L. DeCOURCY, 1920 Dexter Avenue, Cincinnati, 
O. ; Section A ; Sodality 1 ; Irish Cultural Academy 1 ; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3 ; Mission Cru- 
sade 1 ; Ohio Club. 

JOHN GERARD DEEDY, Jr., 12 Wabash Avenue, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 
1, 2; Cross and Scroll 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3; Knights of Columbus 1, 2, 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; 
French Academy 1, 2; Worcester Club. 

JAMES DANIEL DELANEY, 72 Paris Avenue, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2, 3; 
Scientific Society 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 
3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; North Shore Club. 

JOHN FRANCIS DELANEY, 901 Bank Street, Waterbury, 
Conn.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Irish Cultural Society 1, 2, 3; History Academy 1; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; Outing Club 1; French Academy 1, 2; Labor 
Academy 1,2; Waterbury and Connnecticut Clubs. 

GERARD C. DES ROCHERS, 5 Framingham Road, Marlboro, 
Mass.; Section A; Sodality 2; Worcester Club. 



GERALD LAWRENCE DESSO, 4 Danker Ave., Albany, N. Y.; 
Section C; Sodality 2, 3; Albany Club. 

ERNEST M. DE GERONIMO, 116 Pine Street, Fitchburg, 
Mass.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1; 
Scientific Society 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Worcester and 
Fitchburg Clubs. 

HENRY W. DION, 160 Canterbury Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1; Scientific 
Society 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Library Staff 1, 2, 3; 
Worcester Club. 

JOHN WILLIAM DOLAN, 15 Beaver Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Worcester Club. 

MELVIN CHARLES DOWNEY, 197 Java Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2; Football 1, 2, 3; Track 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1 ; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3 ; Metropolitan 
Club. 

ROBERT ANTHONY DRISCOLL, 5 Cliff Road, Milton, 
Mass.; Section A; Irish Cultural Academy 1; Intramural Sports 

1, 2, 3; German Academy 2, 3; Boston Club. 

THOMAS H. DRISCOLL, Jr., 196 Freeman Parkway, Provi- 
dence, R. I.; Section A; Dramatic Society 1, 2, 3; Playshop 1, 

2, 3 ; Purple 2, 3 ; Cross and Scroll 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3; Rhode 
Island Club, Treasurer. 

GEORGE ALOYSIUS DRUNKENBROD, Jr., 1429 Wyoming 
Avenue, Scranton, Pa.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; Worcester Club. 

THOMAS FRANCIS DUFFY, 19 Walnut Street, Putnam, 
Conn.; Section C; Sodality 2, 3; Intramural Debating 2; His- 
tory Academy 2, 3; Intramural Sports 2, 3; Mission Crusade 
2, 3; Worcester Club. 

EDMUND JEROME DUNN, 4 Keefe Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. ; 
Section B; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 2; History Acad- 
emy 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 2; 
Labor Academy 2. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-four 



JAMES WALSH EGAN, 74 Bentley Avenue, Jersey City 
N. J.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2 
Dramatic Society 1, 2; Track 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 
Mission Crusade 2, 3; New Jersey Club, Secretary 1. 

WILLIAM FRANCIS ESIP, Jr.. 93 Fairfax Road, Worcester, 
Mass. ; Section B ; Sodality 2 ; Intramural Sports 2 ; Knights of 
Columbus 3 ; Mission Crusade 2 ; Worcester Club. 

JAMES DOMINICK EVANS, Jr., 10 Lee Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; History Academy 1, 2, 3, 
Vice-President; Worcester Club. 

JAMES FEE, 168 Sullivan Place, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Section B; 
Sodality 1, 2; B. J. F. 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic 
Society 1, 2, 3; Tomahawk 1; Irish Cultural Academy 1; His- 
tory 7 Academy 2, 3 ; Cross and Scroll 1, 2, 3 ; Varsity Debating 
3 ; Intramural Sports 1 ; Labor Academy 2, 3 ; Metropolitan 
Club, Vice-President. 

CARL GEORGE FISCHER, 4120 Kings Highway, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Section B; Tennis 1, 2, 3 ; Intramural Sports 2, 3. 

ROBERT EMMET FISHER, 200 18th Street, Watervliet, N. Y. ; 
Section D; Intramural Debating 1. 

JAMES EDWARD FITZGERALD, Saw Mill River Road, 
Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. ; Section B; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; Metropolitan Club. 

JOHN EDWARD FITZGERALD, 51 Dexter Street, Spring- 
field, Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 

1, 2 ; Irish Cultural Society 1 ; History Academy 2 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; Purple Key 1, 2, 3. 

JOHN FRANCIS FLAHERTY, Fitch Avenue, Morton, Conn.; 
Section D; Intramural Debating 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3- 

H. EDWARD FOOTE, 482 Washington Street, Wellesley, 
Mass.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; History Academy 1, 2, 3; 
Football 1; Baseball 1; Basketball 1; Tennis 1, 2; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1; 
Labor Academy 1, 2, 3; Quarterdeck Club (N. R. O. T. C.) 

2, 3 ; Boston Club. 

KENNETH JOHN FOSTER, 147 Stomen Avenue, New Ro- 
chelle, N. Y. ; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; History Academy 
3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Outing Club 1; Mission Crusade 
1, 2, 3; Metropolitan Club. 

FRANK XAVIER FRAYER, 178-26 Dalny Road, Jamaica, 
N. Y.; Section C; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3; Knights of Columbus 1; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; 
Labor Academy 2, 3; Metropolitan Club. 

ALBERT E. FROST, Main Street, East Douglas, Mass.; Section 
D; Sodality 1, 2; Band 3; Worcester Club. 

JOHN WILLIAM GAHAN, Jr., 20 Locksley Road, Newton 
Center, Mass.; Section A; Intramural Debating 2; Tomahawk 
2; Golf 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 
3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; Boston Club. 

THEODORE THADDEUS GALKOWSKI, 2 Spurr Street, 
Worcester, Mass.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural De- 
bating 2; Scientific Society 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Worcester Club. 

WILLIAM J. GALLAGHER, Jr., 7214 Greenway Drive, St. 
Louis, Mo.; Section A; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2; German Academy 2, 3; Western Club. 

LOUIS BENEDICT GARIEPY, 14590 Abington Road, Detroit, 
Mich.; Section D; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3- 

JOSEPH GARLAND, Jr., 102 Vernon Avenue, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; B. J. F. 3 ; Intramural De- 
bating 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2; Playshop 2; Purple 
Patcher 3; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3; History Academy 1, 2, Vice- 
President 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Choir 3; French Academy 1, 2, 3; Record 
ing Secretary N. E. Catholic College Student Peace Federation 
Metropolitan Club. 



GEORGE FRANCIS GEARY, Jr., 3508 Avenue K, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Dramatic Society 1, 2, 3; Playshop 1, 2; History Academy 1, 2, 
3; Tomahawk 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3", Sanctuary So- 
ciety 1; French Academy 1, Vice-President 2, 3; Le Croise 2, 3; 
Metropolitan Club. 

HARPER THOMPSON GERRY, 28 Church Street, Shelburne 
Falls, Mass.; Section B; Baseball 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. 

VINCENT J. ANTHONY GIANQUINTO, 377 Union Street, 
Brooklyn, N. Y.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural De- 
bating 2; Scientific Society 1, 2, 3", Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3", Metro- 
politan Club. 

RICHARD GIBSON, 159 Pine Street, Lewiston, Me.; Section 
B; Football 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; French Academy 

2, 3. 

FRANK R. GRADY, 11 Catherine Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2, 3; Purple 
Assistant Business Manager 3 ; Irish Cultural Academy 2, 3 ; 
History Academy 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Knights 
of Columbus 3 ; Mission Crusade 3 ; Worcester Club. 

JOHN THOMAS GRADY, 104 School Street, Clinton, Mass.; 
Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. 

RICHARD HENRY GRAHAM, 11 Irving Road, Waban, 
Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Boston Club. 

NICHOLAS GUERRIERI, 415 Central Avenue, New Haven, 
Conn.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Track 1, 2; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 
3; Italian Academy 1, 2, 3; Assistant Football Manager 1, 2, 3; 
Manager of Student School Postoffice; New Haven Club. 

PAUL WILBUR GUINEY, 9 Crystal Street, Worcester, Mass. ; 

Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3; Labor Academy; Worcester Club. 

DONALD VINCENT HANKINSON, 6l6A 3rd Street, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. ; Section B ; Scientific Society 1 ; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3; Glee Club 2, 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; Metropolitan 
Club. 

WILLIAM HANLEY, Jr., 1213 Bloomfield Street, Hoboken, 
N. J.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Scientific Society 2; Irish Cultural Academy 1, 2; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; New Jersey Club. 

JOSEPH PATRICK HANNIGAN, 244 Manheim Street, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa.; Section C; Intramural Debating 1; Golf 1; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2, 3 ; Pennsylvania 
Club. 

FRANCIS JOSEPH HARRINGTON, Jr., 48 Blue Hill Ter- 
race, Milton, Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1; Baseball 1; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3; Boston Club. 

JOHN EDWARD HASSETT, 142 Castle Street, Great Barring- 
ton, Masss.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Scientific Society 1, 2, 
3; Tennis 1, 2, 3; Berkshire Club. 

GERALD J. HEROUX, 10 Yale Street, North Uxbridge Mass.; 
Section B ; Worcester Club. 

EDWARD EVERETT HEWITT, 806 Court Street, Ports- 
mouth, Va. ; Section A; Sodality 1, 2; B. J. F. 3; Intramural 
Debating 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2, 3; Irish Cultural Acad- 
emy 2, 3; Cross and Scroll 1, 2, 3; Varsity Debating 3; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 2, 3; 
Philharmonic 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 2; Mason 
and Dixon Club. 

RICHARD JOSEPH HIGGINS, 184 Grant Street, Framing- 
ham, Mass.; Junior B; Sodality 2; Baseball 1; Framingham 
Club. 

DAVID J. HILL, Providence Street, Millbury, Mass.; Section 
D; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Mission Crusade 1, 2; 
Worcester Club. 

PAUL ANTHONY HINES, 37 George Street, Newton, Mass. ; 
Section D ; Sodality 2 ; History Academy 1 ; Track 3 ; Tennis 2 ; 
Sanctuary Society 1 ; Boston Club, Vice-President 3. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-four 




JUNIOR C 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. S. J. Trzcinski, J. E. George, A. C. Mazeika, J. A. Ross, K. G. Sasso, T. F. Duffy, Fr. Quane, S.J., J. O'C. 
McGann, J. W. Walber, H. F. Kilfoil, R. J. O'Connor, P. L. Friel, J. G. Deedy, Jr. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. P. V. Lyons, N. T. 
Jones, J. F. Bianchi, R. J. Nolan, J. C. Condron, A. E. Wasgatt, Jr., W. A. Morin, T. F. Sullivan, Jr., R. A. Cote, C. J. Powers, G. L. 
Desso, M. J. Browne, W. B. Collins, Jr., F. R. Grady. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. J. E. Ryan, jr., M. C. McCue, J. P. Hannigan, J. J. 
Leary, J. W. Dolan, D. J. Anderson, F. P. Delaney, J. F. Brennan, F. E. Powers, W. A. Rojcewicz, J. V. Bucher, W. B. Houston, F. X. 
Frayer. Fourth Row, left to right: Messrs. T. E. Hoar, G. A. Druckenbrod, J. P. Dillon, J. F. Madden, P. H. Murray, H. E. Murphy, C. 
Lakomski, K. J. Foster, E. F. O'Neil, R. C. Inbush, H. E. Foote, Jr., S. Murphy. 



THOMAS EUGENE HOAR, 129 Burncoat Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section C; Intramural Debating 1; Tomahawk 1; His- 
tory Academy 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Assistant Baseball 
Manager 1; Manager 2, 3; Assistant Manager of Basketball 1. 

WALTER EDWARD HOAR, 19 Rendall Road, West Roxbury, 
Mass.; Section B; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Football 1, 2, 3; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Boston Club. 

ALPHONSE J. HOMICZ, 63 Highland Street, Southbridge, 
Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; History Academy 3; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3; Worcester Club. 

WILLIAM B. HOUSTON, 18 Beaver Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Section C ; Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Tomahawk 1 ; 
Irish Cultural Academy 1 ; Yacht Club 1 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3 ; Mission Crusade 1 ; Worcester Club. 

RALPH INBUSCH, 2312 E. Lake Bluff Boulevard, Milwaukee, 
Wis.; Section C; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic Society 

1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Labor Academy 2, 3; Wisconsin 
Club, Treasurer 3. 

WILLIAM FRANCIS JAHANT, 255 North Partage Path, 
Akron, O. ; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Playshop 1; Yacht 
Club 1; Camera Club 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Labor 
Academy 1 ; Ohio Club. 

ARMAND BENEDICT JANNETTE, 9 Cedar Street, South 
Barre, Mass.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 

2, 3 ; French Academy 1 ; Labor Academy 1, 2 ; Worcester Club. 

NORMAN THOMAS JONES, Jordan Avenue, Wakefield, 
Mass.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Outing Club 2, 3 ; Spanish Academy 1, 2 ; Boston Club. 

CHARLES FREDRICK KAHLER, 1151 Sumner Avenue, 
Schenectady, N. Y. ; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Irish Cultural 
Society 1, 2; Intramural Sports 2, 3 ; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; 
Labor Academy 3 ; Albany Club. 

BASIL WILLIAM KAINE, 2 Belmont Avenue, Brattleboro 
Vt.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2 ; Irish Cultural Society 1, 2, 3 
History Academy 1, 2; Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 
Sanctuary Society 1 ; Purple Key 3 ; French Academy 1 ; Ver- 
mont Club. 



JOSEPH M. KEEGAN, 138 Hamilton Avenue, Passaic, N. J.; 
Section B; Sodality 1, 2, 3; B. J. F. 3; Intramural Debating 1, 
2 ; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3 ; Varsity Debating 3 ; Intramural Sports 
1, 2 ; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; Class Ring Committee, Chair- 
man 3 ; Purple Key 1, 2, 3 ; Vice-President, New Jersey Club. 

JOSEPH RAYMOND KELLY, 38 Churchill Street, Spring- 
field, Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Intramural Debating 
1; Scientific Society 2; History Academy 1, 2; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1; French Acad- 
emy 1, 2, 3 ; Springfield Club. 

THOMAS F. KELLY, Jr., 3 City View Street, Worcester, 
Mass. ; Section B ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Baseball 1 ; Track 1 ; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; French Academy 1 ; Worcester Club. 

RAYMOND J. KENNEDY, 51 Ball Farm Road, Oskville, 
Conn.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Irish Cultural Society 1, 2, 
3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Knights of Columbus 1, 2, 3; 
Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 2, 3; Waterbury Club. 

HENRY FRANCIS KILFOIL, Hotel Bondmore, Hartford, 
Conn., Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Irish Cultural Academy 1, 2, 
3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 2, 3; Knights 
of Columbus 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 2, 3; Hartford Club. 

THOMAS F. KILFOIL, 19 Princeton Street, New Britain, 
Conn.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Society 1, 2, 3; 
Cross and Scroll 3 ; New Britain Club. 

EDWARD FRANCIS KIRBY, Jr., 10 Intervale Road, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Cross and Scroll 3; Mis- 
sion Crusade 1, 2; Worcester Club. 

CHESTER LAKOMSKI, 180 Cleveland Street, Providence, 
R. I.; Section C; History Academy 1; Track 1, 2, 3; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Knights of Columbus 1,2,3; Mission Crusade 
1, 2, 3 ; Rhode Island Club. 

FRANCIS HAMILTON LANE, Jr., 32 Shores Street, Taunton, 
Mass.; Section B; To?nahawk 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2, 3; Le Croise 
1, 2, 3; Fall River Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-four 



JOHN LEE LARKIN, 14 Pearl Street, Kingston, N. Y.; Sec 
tion B; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Irish Cultural Academy 1, 2 
History Academy 1, 2, 3; Camera Club 1, 2; Intramural Sports 

1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Knights of Columbus 1, 2, 3 
French Academy 1, 2, 3; Albany Club 1, 2, 3. 

FRANCIS PAUL LAVIN, 159-18-89th Avenue, Jamaica, N. Y. 
Section B; Track 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Metropolitan 
Club. 

EDWIN DANIEL LAWLOR, 166 North Ridgeland Avenue, 
Oak Park, 111.; Section D; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3: Chicago 
Club. 

ROBERT JAMES LAWSON. 88 Maple Avenue. Tuchahoe, 
N. Y. ; Section D; Football 1, 2, 3; Track 1; Intramural Sports 
1,2,3; Sanctuary Society 1 ; Metropolitan Club. 

WILLIAM LOUIS LEBLING, Jr., 5604 Edgemoor Lane, Beth- 
esda, Md.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; B. J. F. 3; Intramural 
Debating 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2; Playshop 1, 2; Mission 
Crusade 1; Labor Academy 1, 2; Mason and Dixon Club. 

JOHN JOSEPH LEARY, Jr., 137 Paine Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Vice-President of Class 1, 

2, 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; Worcester Club. 

ROBERT FRANCIS LOHR, 243 Ottawa Avenue, Hasbrouck 
Heights, N. J.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debat- 
ing 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; 
New Jersey Club. 

FRANCIS JOSEPH LOUGHLIN, 17 Blanche Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass. ; Section B ; Sodality 3 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 ", 
Knights of Columbus 2, 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; Worcester 
Club. 

JAMES RYAN LUCID, 20 Lewis Avenue, Batavia, N. Y.; 
Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 2; Scientific 
Society 1, 2, Secretary 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Band 1; 
Niagara Frontier Club. 

PAUL VINCENT LYONS, 30 Bristol Street, Thomaston, 
Conn.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1; Irish 
Cultural Academy 1, 2, 3 ; Cross and Scroll 1 ; Tennis 1, 2 ; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Outing Club 2, 3; Mission Crusade 
1; French Academy 1, 2, 3; Waterbury Club, Treasurer 1. 

FRANCIS XAVIER MacAULAY, 224 Chestnut Street, Gard- 
ner, Mass.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Scientific Society 1; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Gardner Club. 

BRONI SAMUEL MACY. 21 Elliott Street, Maiden, Mass.; 
Section B; Football 1, 2, 3; Track 1: Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Boston Club. 

JOHN FRANCIS MADDEN, 1 St. Elmo Road, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; History Academy 1, 2, 3; 
Mission Crusade 1 ; Worcester Club. 

ROBERT E. MAHER, 1285 Main Street, Winchester, Mass.; 
Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Worces- 
ter Club. 

JOHN J. MAHONEY, 40 Old Colony Road, Chestnut Hills, 
Mass.; Section B; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3 ; Philharmonic 1, 3; Band 1, 3; 
Boston Club. 

JOSEPH JEROME MALLAHAN, 33 Blakeslee Street, Cam- 
bridge, Mass.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Class Secretary 1, 2, 
3; Track 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 

1, 2, 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; Boston Club. 

ROBERT EDWARD MALONEY, 152 Lovell Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1, 

2, 3; History Academy 1, 3; Glee Club 3; Band 2, 3; Mission 
Crusade 1, 2, 3; Worcester Club, Vice-President 3- 

WILLIAM EDWARD MANNING, Jr., 234 Seventh Street, 
Leominster, Mass.; Section B; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Worcester 
Club. 

DONALD ROBERT MARKHAM, 830 Chestnut Avenue, Wil- 
mette, 111.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; B. J. F. 3 ; Intramural 
Debating 1, 2, President 2; Varsity Debating 3; Tennis 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Chicago Club, Secretary 2, Vice- 
President 3. 



ROBERT BERNARD MASTERSON, Jr., 258 La Grange 
Street, West Roxbury, Mass.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; B. J. 
F. 3 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Scientific Society 2, 3 ; Cross and 
Scroll 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3 ; 
Spanish Academy 1, 2 ; Boston Club. 

RICHARD EVERETT MAXWELL, 5 Kitten Street. Taunton. 
Mass. ; Section B ; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Tomahawk 1, 2 ; Baseball 
1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Fall 
River Club. 

ALBERT KASPER MAZEIKA, 9 Ashmont Avenue, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Football 1; Basketball 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Worcester Club. 

ARTHUR LOUIS MAZZU, 64 Marshall Street, North Adams, 
Mass.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Scientific Society 1, 2, 3; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Philharmonic 1, 2; Mission Crusade 
1 ; Berkshire Club. 

EDWARD EUGENE MCCARTHY, 21 Crowninshield Road, 
Brookline, Mass.; Section B; Playshop 1; Irish Cultural Society 
1, 2, 3; Camera Club 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Outing 
Club 1; French Academy 1, 2; Boston Club. 

PHILIP L. MCCARTHY. Ill Blue Hills Parkway. Milton, 
Mass.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2; Track 1; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Philharmonic 1; Band 1; Boston 
Club. 

ALLYN HAYES McCOURT, 34 Hopkins Road, Jamaica 
Plains, Mass.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3; Band 1; Boston Club. 

MARTY CHARLES McCUE. 128 Pavilion Avenue, Long 
Branch, N. J.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3; 
Irish Cultural Society 1, 2, 3 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 ", Sanc- 
tuary Society 1, 2, 3, First Assistant; Purple Key 3; Knights 
of Columbus 2, 3; New Jersey Club. 

WILLIAM P. McENIRY. 2424 East Beverly Road, Milwaukee, 
Wis.; Section A; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic Soicety 
1, 2, Secretary 2 ; Playshop 1, 2 ; Tomahawk 1 ; Cross and Scroll 
1 ; Intramural Sports 1,2,3; Wisconsin Club. 

JOHN O'CONNOR McGANN, Main Street. Rutland, Mass.; 
Section C; Irish Cultural Academy 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 

1, 2, 3; Knights of Columbus 2, 3; Worcester Club. 

PAUL FRANCIS McGRATH, 22 Ledge Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section B; Class Ring Committee 3; Philharmonic 1, 2, 
3; Band 1, 2, 3; Mission Crusade 3; Crusaders 1, 2, 3; 
Worcester Club. 

JOHN DANIEL McNALLY, 34 Whittier Road, Needham, 
Mass.; Section C; Sodality 1. 2, 3; Intramural Debating 2; 
Yacht Club 1, 2; History Academy 2, 3; Track 1, 2, 3; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Sanctuary Society 1,2; Boston Club. 

JOHN F. McNAMARA, 235 Melrose Street, Melrose, Mass.; 
Section D ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Irish Cultural Academy 1, 

2, 3; Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Boston Club. 

JAMES KIRKWOOD MICHAELS, 7516 3rd Avenue, Brook- 
lyn. N. Y.; Section D; Sodality 1; Intramural Debating 2; Sci- 
entific Society 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Metropolitan 
Club. 

WILLIAM H. MILLS. Jr.. 19 Sutherland Road, Arlington, 
Mass.; Football 1, 2; Baseball 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 

RAYMOND R. MILNER, 158 Miller Street, Meriden, Conn.; 
Section D; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Hart- 
ford Club. 

RICHARD JOSEPH MONAHAN, 50 Sylvan Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 2; 
Glee Club 1,2,3; Mission Crusade 3 ; Worcester Club. 

JOHN PHILIP MORGAN, 10 Park Street, Methuen, Mass.; 
Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; B. J. F. 3 ; Intramural Debating 1, 
2; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3; Yacht Club 2; History Academy 2, 3; 
Golf 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Mission Crusade 2; Law- 
rence Club. 

WALTER JOSEPH MORIARTY, 5 Clearview Avenue, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Worcester Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-four 




JUNIOR D 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. W. F. Jahant, W. A. Burke, J. J. Stapor, R. E. Callahan, W. M. Reilly, E. A. Braunstein, Fr. Glavin, S.J., 
E. M. Di Geronimo, V. A. Gianquinto, F. P. Sweeney, P. W. Guiney, T. T. Galkowski, P. A. Hines. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. 
E. D. Lawler, H. W. Dion, J. T. Boyle, J. J. O'Loughlin, F. A. Carrier, R. A. Bruno, R. L. Boettjer, R. B. Masterson, J. A. Athy, A. A. 
Athy, J. J. Archibald, D. P. Weitekamp, J. F. McNamara, J. W. Monahan, Jr., R. F. Lohr, J. A. Connolly, L. J. Celentano. Third Row, 
left to right: Messrs. J. A. Belisle, J. B. Colton, Jr., P. E. Plasse, R. E. Barrett, J. R. Lucid, J. Bolton, Jr., G. B. Cournoyer, A. E. Frost, 
R. R. Milner, A. L. Mazzu, R. J. Kennedy, R. K. Wise, W. T. Cullen, Jr., J. K. Michaels, R. E. Fischer, E. J. Butler, J. T. Bromley. Fourth 
Row, left to right: Messrs. J. F. Flaherty, W. M. Conlin, L. B. Gariepy, D. J. Hill, A. E. Ogden, J. E. Hassett, R. J. Lawson, F. X. Mac- 
Aulay, G. V. Coleman, V. S. LaRosa, A. B. Jannette, N. A. Sasso, J. G. Vineault, C. F. Trebbe, Jr. 



WILFRED A. MORIN, 315 Oxford Street, Auburn, Mass.; 
Section C; Sodality 1, 2; Worcester Club. 

WALTER RICHARD MOYNIHAN, 147 West Street, Milford, 
Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; B. J. F. 3; Intramural De- 
bating 2; Tomahau'k 2, 3; Irish Cultural Academy 1; History 
Academy 3; Varsity Debating 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Band 
Assistant Manager 2; Mission Crusade 2; French Academy 1, 
Secretary 2, 3 ; Le Croise 2, Editor-in-Chief 3; Milford Club. 

DANIEL JOSEPH MURPHY, Jr., 3 Bradford Avenue, Hull, 
Mass.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2, 3; History Academy 2; Intra- 
mural Debating 1, 2, 3; Boston Club. 

HARRY E. MURPHY, 108-11 69th Drive, Forest Hills, N. Y. ; 
Section C ; Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Irish Cultural 
Academy 1 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Mission Crusade 1 ; 
Metropolitan Club. 

STEPHEN FRANCIS MURPHY, 462 East 137th Street, Bronx, 
N. Y. ; Section B; Irish Cultural Academy 3; Football 1, 2, 3; 
Baseball 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1; Sanc- 
tuary Society 1, 2, 3; Metropolitan Club. 

FRANCIS MENARD MURRAY, Julius Marks Sanatorium, 
Lexington, Ky. ; Section A; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanc- 
tuary Society 1, 2, 3 ; Knights of Columbus 1, 2, 3 ; Recorder 
3 ; Philharmonic 1 ; Band 1 ; Mason Dixon Club. 

PAUL HENRY MURRAY, 89 Lawrence Street, Gardner, Mass.; 
Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 2; Tomahawk 

1, 2, 3; Irish Cultural Academy 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 

2, 3 ; Sanctuary Society 2 ; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3 ; Gardner 
Club. 

JOHN JOSEPH NICHOLSON, 27 Dorchester Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1; 
Worcester Club. 

ROBERT JAMES NOLAN, 170 Ridge Street, Glens Falls, 
N. Y. ; Section C; Sodality 1; Intramural Debating 2; Irish 
Cultural Academy 1, 2; History Academy 2, 3; Class Treasurer 
1, 2, 3; Baseball 1; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 
3; Labor Academy 1, 2; Albany Club 1, 2, 3. 



JOHN WILLIAM O'BRIEN, 76 Upsala Street, Worcester, 
Mass. ; Section D ; Sodality 1 ; Intramural Sports 2 ; Mission 
Crusade 1 ; Worcester Club. 

JOSEPH NORMAN O'CONNOR, 80 North Main Street, 
Webster, Mass. ; Section B ; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; Intramural De- 
bating 1, 2; History Academy 1; Basketball 1; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; French Academy 1, 2; Worcester Club. 
RICHARD JOHN O'CONNOR, 19 Clement Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; B. J. F. 3; Intramural De- 
bating 1 ; Intramural Sports 1 ; Worcester Club. 
JAMES PAUL O'DONNELL, 14 Summit Street, Clinton, 
Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Camera Club 1, 2, 3; 
Knights of Columbus 1, 2, 3; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; Fitch- 
burg Club. 

ARTHUR ELDRIDGE OGDEN, 62 Ocean Street, Quincy, 
Mass.; Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 2; Sci- 
entific Society 1, 2, 3; Yacht Club 1, 2, 3, Vice-Commandant 3; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3; Boston Club. 
DONALD FRANCIS O'LEARY, 51 Vernon Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2; Tomahau'k 1; Intramural 
Sports 1 ; Knights of Columbus 1 ; Worcester Club. 

JOHN J. O'LOUGHLIN, Howard Beach, N. Y.; Section D; 
Sodality 2, 3 ; Intramural Debating 2 ; Scientific Society 3 ; 
Yacht Club 3 ; Oratorical Contest 2 ; Golf 2 ; Intramural Sports 

1, 2, 3; Metropolitan Club. 

EDWARD FRANCIS O'NEILL, P. O. Box 302, Moodus, 
Conn.; Section C; Sodality 2, 3; History Academy 3; Choir 1, 

2, 3; Organist 3. 

HENRY ANTHONY OZIMEK, 170 Vernon Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intraural Debating 1 
Dramatic Society 1 ; Lecture Debating 1 ; Oratorical Contest 1 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Philharmonic 1; Violin Soloist 
Worcester Club. 

WILLIS LINCOLN PALMER, Jr., 162 Auburn Street, Auburn, 
Mass.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2, 3; History Academy 1; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Worcester Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-four 



ROBERT SUMNER PHILLIPS, 98 Congress Street, Milford, 
Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Milford Club 1, 2, 3. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH PISARRA, 1921 60th Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Section A; Tomahaick 1; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3; Metropolitan Club. 

PAUL E. PLASSE, 22 Stoughton Avenue, Webster, Mass.; 
Section D; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Scientific 
Society 1, 2, 3; Camera Club 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Worcester Club. 

CHARLES JOSEPH WARNOK POWERS, 76 Brookley Road, 
Forest Hills, Mass.; Section C; Football 1; Basketball 2; French 
Academy 1, 2. 

FRANK E. POWERS, Jr., 13 Caporn Street, Uxbridge, Mass.; 
Section C; Sodality 3; Cross and Scroll 1; Assistant Manager 
Football 3 ; Intramural Sports 3 ; Sanctuary Society 3 ; Milford 
Club. 

WILLIAM P. QUISH, 5 Plymouth Lane, Manchester, Conn.; 
Section B; Sodality 2, 3; Intramural Debating 2; Irish Cultural 
Academy 1, 2; Yacht Club 2, 3; Camera Club 1, 2, 3 ; Tennis 
2; Intramural Debating 1, 2, 3; Knights of Columbus 1, 2, 3; 
Mission Crusade 2, 3 ; French Academy 1, 2, 3. 

WALTER M. REILLY, 16 Olive Street, Naugatuck, Conn.; 
Section D; Sodality 2; Scientific Society 1; Waterbury Club. 

WILLIAM ANTHONY RILEY, 4 Ash Street, Hopkinton, 
Mass. ; Section B ; Sodality 2 ; Intramural Sports 3 ; Worcester 
Club. 

WALTER ALEXANDER JOHN ROJCEWICZ, 92 Vernon 
Street, Worcester ; Section C ; Sodality 2 ; Intramural Debat- 
ing 2; Mission Crusade 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 3; Worcester 
Club. 

JOHN ALBERT ROSS, 21 Argyle Place, Rockville Centre, 
N. Y.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Tomahawk 1; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Choir 1 ; Metropolitan Club. 

MICHAEL CHARLES SAAB, 54 Charles Street, Springfield, 
Mass.; Section B; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 3; 
Springfield Club. 

KEITH GLENDON SASSO, 63 Lady Musgrave Road, Kings- 
ton, Jamaica, B. W. I.; Section C; Track 1, 2, 3; Knights of 
Columbus 2, 3 ; West Indies Club. 

NEVILLE ANTHONY SASSO, Upper Musgrave Avenue, 
Jamaica, B. W. I.; Section D; Tennis 1, 2, 3; Band 1, 2, 3; 
West Indies Club. 

JOHN JOSEPH SCANLON, 37 Locust Street, Lynn, Mass.; 
Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 2; North Shore 
Club. 

ROBERT JOSEPH SCHLITT, 25 Gifford Avenue, Jersey City, 
N. J.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; B. J. F. 1, 2, 3; Intramural 
Debating 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Society 2; History Academy 1, 2, 
3; Cross and Scroll 1, 2, 3; Varsity Debating 3; Track 1; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2, 3 ; Sanctuary Society 2, 3 ; Mission Crusade 
2; Labor Academy 1, 2, 3; New Jersey Club. 

RONALD FRANCIS SLINEY, 671 LaGrange Street, West 
Roxbury, Mass.; Section C; Baseball 2, 3; Football 1, 2, 3; 
Boston Club. 

JAMES ANGUS SMITH, Jr., 92 East Wesley Road, N. E., 
Atlanta, Ga.; Section B; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Mission Cru- 
sade 1, 2, 3; Mason-Dixon Club, Secretary-Treasurer 2. 

MICHAEL T. SPONZO, 11 Wiltshire Lane, West Hartford, 
Conn.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2; Tomahawk 1; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2 ; Choir 1 ; Hartford Club. 

JOSEPH JOHN STAPOR, 104 New Haven Avenue, Derby, 
Conn.; Section D; Intramural 1, 2, 3. 



KENNETH EDWARD SULLIVAN, 1273 North Avenue, New 
Rochelle, N. Y. ; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, 3; B. J. F. 3 ; Intra- 
mural Debating 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2, 3; Playshop 1, 2, 
Director 3; Tomahawk 1, 2, 3; Cross and Scroll 2, 3; Irish 
Cultural Academy 1, 2, 3; History Academy 2, 3; Intramural 
Sports 1, 3; Sanctuary Society 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, Assistant 
Manager 3; Choir 1, 2, 3; Soloist; Metropolitan Club; Honor- 
ary Member Mason-Dixon Club. 

THOMAS FRANCIS SULLIVAN, Jr., 27 Concord Avenue, 
Cambridge, Mass.; Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Sanctuary Society 1, 2, 3; French 
Academy 1, 2. 

THOMAS J. SULLIVAN, 14 Pleasant Street, Franklin, N. H.; 
Section A; B. J. F. 3; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Irish Cultural 
Academy 2, 3; Varsity Debating 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Sanctuary Society; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 2; French 
Academy 1, 2 ; New Hampshire Club. 

FRANCIS PAUL SWEENEY, 81 Hazel Street, Hartford, Conn.; 
Section D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Hartford Club. 

PATRICK F. SWEENEY, Jr., 43 Bridge Street, Great Bar- 
rington, Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 
2, 3; French Academy 1, 2, 3; Berkshire Club. 

GEORGE T. TITUS, 1809 Beverly Road, Brooklyn, N. Y.; 
Section B; Sodality 2, 3; Intramural Debating 2, 3; Football 

1, 2, 3; Track 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Labor Academy 

2, 3; Metropolitan Club. 

HENRY JOSEPH TORDIGLIONE, 596 Union Avenue, Fram- 
ingham, Mass.; Section D; Sodality 2; History Academy 2; 
Intramural Sports 2 ; Worcester Club. 

CHARLES F. TREBBE, Jr., 45 Crescent Street, Middletown, 
Conn. ; Section D ; Intramural Sports 3 ; Purple Key 3 ; Labor 
Academy 2; Hartford Club, Vice-President 3- 

STANLEY JOSEPH TRZCINSKI, 2 Bigelow Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Section C; Baseball 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. 

JOHN EDWARD TYLER, 63 Hadwen Road, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section A; Sodality 1, 2, Secretary 3; Tomahawk 1; 
History Academy 2 ; Intramural Sports 1 ; German Academy 2 ; 
Worcester Club. 

ROBERT ANTHONY VACCA, V/ 2 Carroll Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Section B; Sodality 1, 2; Football 1, 2; Worcester Club. 

JOHN G. VIGNEAULT, 2851 Main Street, Springfield, Mass.; 
Section D; Scientific Society 1,2,3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
Springfield Club. 

JOHN W. WALBER, New Lebanon, N. Y.; Section C; So- 
dality 1, 2 ; Intramural Debating 1, 2; History Academy; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2; Choir 1, 2; French Academy 1, 2, 3; Croise 
1, 2, 3; Berkshire Club. 

AMOS E. WASGATT, Jr., 86 Fairfax Road, Worcester, Mass.; 
Section C; Sodality 1, 2, 3 ; B. J. F. 3 ; Intramural Debating 1; 
Irish Cultural Academy 1, 2; Mission Crusade 1; Worcester 
Club. 

CHESTER JOSEPH WASILEWSKI, 363 South Meade Street, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; Section B; Football 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3; 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Italian Academy 
1, 2 ; Pennsylvania Club. 

DANIEL P. WEITEKAMP, 627 Knickerbocker Avenue, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y.; Section D; Football 1, 2, 3; Track 1, 2, 3; Class 
Ring Committee 3 ; Metropolitan Club. 

ROBERT K. WISE, 17206 Parkside, Detroit, Mich.; Section 
D; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Yacht Club 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. 

CHESTER WALTER YABLONSKI, 25 Greenwood Place, 
Gardner, Mass.; Section B; Football 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 
1, 2, 3; Gardner Club. 

JOSEPH T. YABROSKY, 37 Webster Street, Unionville, 
Conn.; Section A; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3- 



Class of Nineteen Forty-four 



The present world conflict, the long-awaited clash 
of one mighty war-machine against another, is, to say 
the least, epoch-making. Of the countless changes 
it has wrought in the normal routine of a peaceful 
existence, perhaps the one most pertinent to our own 
college life is the drastic increase in the tempo of our 
curricular activity. Such has been the acceleration 
here on the Hill that the class of '45, though it will 
always be just that, '45, will have gained the dubious 
distinction of being the first class in the history of 
Holy Cross to bid farewell to Alma Mater a full year 
ahead of schedule. 

Accordingly, in April of 1942, we, the men of 
'45 rushed through our final exams as Freshmen, 
stopped only long enough to exchange that awed 
freshman look for a more smug sophomore sophis- 
tication, and then vigorously assailed our second-year 
duties with the renewed confidence that only experi- 
ence can bring. Facing us was the task of complet- 
ing in two months the greater part of a full semester's 
work. The abbreviated summer vacation would be 
followed by five weeks' more intensive study, which 
would complete the first semester's endeavors. The 
necessity of plying textbooks during the hot summer 
evenings up to July gained little solace from the 
prospect of early graduation, especially when we 
viewed the torn and bleeding condition of the world 
to which we would fall heirs. 

But despite adverse conditions, all was not dark 
and gloomy in our sophomoric universe. Two events, 

SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 




William L. Kellick 
President 



Thomas A. Hickey 
Vice-President 



Sophomores 



CLASS OF 1945 



both sponsored by the R. O. T. C. Unit, highlighted 
the Spring session from a social standpoint. On June 
20, members of the class and their dates danced to the 
music of Dol Brissette and his orchestra in the ball- 
room of the Bancroft, which had been the scene, 
two weeks previous, of the Junior Prom. Dance com- 
mittee chairman Ed Meyer and his assistants merited 
the earnest appreciation of their class for the warm 
spirit of class unity prevailing throughout the affair, 
which was unanimously voted a huge success, worthy 
of annual renewal. On the following Saturday, the 
Naval Unit held its first annual Visitors' Day Inspec- 
tion and Parade. Prominent guests at the occasion 
were Admiral Wat Tyler Cluverius and Senator David 
I. Walsh of Massachusetts. After the parade and 
inspection of various naval exhibits, Rev. Fr. Max- 
well entertained the guests and officers of the Unit 
at a tea held in Dinand Library. 

Less than two weeks later, Mt. St. James was the 
scene of the annual summer exodus, although this 
time it occurred more than a month later than usual. 
Predominant in our minds, of course, was the long- 
awaited rest from books and classes. But lurking 
somewhere in the recesses of year-ripened brains as 
we shouted boisterous farewells to each other was 
probably more than a normal anxiety for the future 
months. What developments would it bring about in 
our own personal circumstances? Who among us 
would find ourselves in far different, perhaps far 
more care-laden positions? But meditation upon 
such profound possibilities was impossible in the 
glow of vacation fever, and, with many a handshake 
and resounding backslap, we were off. 

The scene that took place just two months later 
might have been photographed on the same film, if 
it were to be recorded for posterity, and no appre- 
ciable difference would have been discovered. The 
handshaking, the backslapping, the shouts of greeting 



were the same when we returned. It was not until 
we had exchanged yarns and started swapping ad- 
ventures that we noticed the absence of so many of 
those who had been our companions a few short 
months before. The seminary, the armed services, 
other schools had all claimed their share of our num- 
ber, and it was a more serious and duty-concious 
group of Sophomores who settled down to the task 
immediately ahead of us: to be worthy of the privi- 
lege bestowed on us, and to extract every possible 
ounce of good from our college careers. 

The fall term found Sophomores assuming many 
of the responsible offices that had been filled by mem- 
bers of the lately graduated class of '42. First in 
both industry and student-interest are, of course, the 
warriors who toil all week on the practice gridiron, 
to give their Alma Mater a fighting football team in 
each Saturday's struggle. Among those gridiron 
giants were such prominent Sophomores as Landri- 
gan, DiGangi, Nolan, Swiacki, Lambert, and Schum 
in the line, and Ball, Wizbicki, Sullivan, Sherwood, 
and Galuska in the backfield. The names of O'Leary, 
Ferrick, Layton, and Mulkern sparkled from the 
accounts of Purple activity on the track front. An- 
swering the call for baseball candidates were several 
members of last Spring's sterling freshman nine, num- 
bering among others, Bill and Mike Connelly, Do- 
herty, Davis, Kellick, Hannon, and Hurley. The 
uncounted hordes of stars on the Intramural grid- 
iron need not be mentioned here; they know who 
they are. 

The claim to fame of '45 comes not only from the 
field of sports. Extra-curricular activities can thank 
sophomore diligence for much of its promotion, just 
as it has looked to sophomore talent for much of its 
material. Purple Key men, Phelan, Cassidy, Con- 
nelly, and Wolff have been as active as their mem- 
bership in the Key indicates. The success of the Vic- 
tory Dance after the Colgate game attests to the fruits 
of their efforts. Sophomores Lambert and Duden- 
hoefer displayed literary talent to burn (in the fig- 
urative sense) in their monthly contributions to the 
Purple. The brunt of reporting for the Tomahaivk 
was borne by sophomore newshawks, and sports col- 
lumnist Frank Waickman blossomed into a most 
capable scribe in keeping abreast of the Intramural 



situation. The Naval newspaper "Beacon," with Rev. 
Fr. Maxwell as Moderator and George McEvoy as Ed- 
itor, was received with the plaudits of all. 

Manager Cassidy, of the Musical Organizations, 
and assistant-manager Kickham had their hands full 
as the band marched at every home game, as well as 
the Brown game in Providence, while the Glee Club 
and Philharmonic Orchestra prepared for their an- 
nual winter season of concerts. Father Foran's assist- 
ants and co-workers in the Sodality are too numerous 
to mention, but are all worthy of high commendation. 

Perhaps the high spot of our entire year was the 
annual Retreat, given this year by Father Raymond 
Kennedy, S.J., and whole-heartedly acclaimed to be 
not only instructive and entertaining, but effective as 
well. 

As the midpoint of our college careers rapidly 
draws into view, we find ourselves in a delicate 
though not impossible position. So far we have best 
been able to serve our country and our station in life 
by remaining in school. As Sophomores, we are 
neither just starting nor nearly finishing our careers; 
yet we are determined that we will strive with all that 
is in us, both to improve our own lives by education, 
if that is possible, and to preserve the life of our 
country by serving it, if such we are called upon to 
do. Whatever our course, we shall always be able 
to look with gratitude to Alma Mater for guidance 
and inspiration in our pursuit of happiness. 

Walter J. Egan. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 




Haydon R. Duffy 
Secretary 



Richard M. Nolan 
Treasurer 




SOPHOMORE A 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. A. B. Bennett, J. J. Layden, J. E. Burns, R. W. Riel, F. A. Hickey, J. B. Noone, F. T. Doyle. Second Row, 
left to right: Messrs. W. J. Egan, J. F. Bradley, M. D. Zewe, A. G. Kehoe, J. V. Phelan, Jr., T. T. Mierzwinski, J. P. Driscoll. Third 
Row, left to right: Messrs. R. W. McChesney, W. W. Byrnes, N. J. Keller, R. O. Johann, W. W. Crandall, R. M. Nolan, W. L. Kellick. 



NORMAN ALLARD, Maple Avenue, Southport, Conn.; So- 
dality 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; French Academy 1; Bridge- 
port Club. 

JOSE ANTONIO ALVAREZ, McKinley # Santurce, Puerto 
Rico; Sodality 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 
1, 2. 

ROBERT JOSEPH ASMAN, Jr., 1041 Forest Road, New Ha- 
ven, Conn.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 

RAYMOND FRANCIS BALL, 24 Rigby Street, Clinton, Mass. ; 
Sodality 1, 2; Football 1, 2; Baseball 1, 2; Intramural Sports 
1, 2 ; Worcester County Club. 

HENRY S. BANACK, 23 Lodi Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality 1. 

ROBERT JOSEPH BANKER, 687 Delaware Avenue, Akron, 
O.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; 
Band 2. 

ARTHUR F. BARKEY, 17616 Woodingham Drive, Detroit, 
Mich.; Sodality 1, 2; Tomahawk 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
N. R. O. T. C. 1. 

LEO JOSEPH BATTISTA, 31 Maple Street, Clinton, Mass.; 
Sodality 1; Italian Academy 1, 2. 

CHARLES CARROL BAXTER, Jr., 13 Penarth Road, Cynwyd, 
Pa.; Sodality 1; History Academy 1, 2; Cross and Scroll 1; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2; Pennsylvania Club 1, 2; German 
Academy 1. 

AUSTIN PETER BENNETT, 242-82nd Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2, Chairman of Art Committee; Intramural 
Debating; History Academy 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanc- 
tuary Society 1, 2 ; Outing Club 1 ; Band 2 ; Choir 1 ; French 
Academy 1, 2 ; Soccer Club 2. 



JAMES EDWARD BENTON, 105 Circular Street, Saratoga 
Springs, N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 2; History 
Academy 1, 2; Camera Club 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Mission 
Crusade 2 ; Albany Club. 

RICHARD JOSEPH BILODEAU, 219 South Appleton Avenue, 
Pittsfield, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Berk- 
shire Club; Football, Assistant Manager 1, 2. 

CHARLES COLTON BINGHAM, 117-14 Union Turnpike, 
Kew Gardens, N. Y. ; Sodality 2 ; Cross and Scroll 1 ; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Labor Academy 1; 
Metropolitan Club. 

OLIVER J. BLABER, 208-17th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; So- 
dality 1 ; Intramural Debating 1, 2 ; Scientific Society 2 ; History 
Academy 1, 2; Cross and Scroll 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Mission Crusade 2 ; Labor Academy 1 ; Metropolitan Club. 

JAMES EDWARD BLOUNT, 3 Paull Street, Taunton, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; 
Band 1, 2; Varsity Baseball Manager 1, 2. 

AURELIO ROBERT BOTTONE, 1717 Benson Avenue, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y.; Sodality 1, 2; History Academy 1; Intramural Sports 
2; Mission Crusade 1; Italian Academy 1. 

ROBERT BOTTS, Honolulu, Hawaii; Sodality 1, 2; Tomahawk 
2; History Academy 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Labor Acad- 
emy 1; Intramural Debating 1. 

JOHN ROHAN BOURQUE, 2 Elliot Street, Holyoke, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; 
Choir 2 ; French Academy 2 ; Holyoke Club. 

JOHN JOSEPH BOURSY, 42 Burncoat Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2, Recorder for 2; Mission Crusade 2; 
Worcester Club; German Club 1, 2. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-five 




SOPHOMORE B 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. A. F. Barkey, J. R. Bourque, Rev. Father Bean, S.J., A. E. Mulkern, E. J. Kroyak. Second Row, left to 

right: Messrs. R. E. Gaffney, T. J. Joyce, J. D. Kelley, T. B. Delaney, J. T. Garrity, J. G. Murray. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. 

C. E. Dawson, J. P. McGalloway, J. J. Brennan, R. E. Vickery, J. R. Driscoll, J. M. Cahill. 



JOHN FRANCIS BRADLEY, 65 Bay Ridge Parkway, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2; Cross and Scroll 1; History Academy 
1 ; Tomahawk 1, 2 ; Purple Patcher 2 ; Intramural Debating 
1, 2; French Academy 1, 2; Metropolitan Club 1, 2; Scientific 
Society 2; Sanctuary Society 1. 



PAUL WILLIAM BRAUNSTEIN, 30-69 36th Street, Long 
Island City, N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2; Tomahawk 2; Scientific Soci- 
ety 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Metropolitan Club. 



EDWARD M. BRAWLEY, Jr., 4 Seneca Road, Peabody, 
Mass.; Football Assistant Manager 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
North Shore Club. 



JOHN J. BRENNAN, 169-I45th Street, Neponset, L. I.; So- 
dality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Tomahawk 1, 2; History 
Academy 1; Track 2; Tennis 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanc- 
tuary Society 1 ; Glee Club 1 ; Choir 2 ; Mission Crusade 2 ; 
Metropolitan Club; Purple Patcher 2. 



STEPHEN WILLIAM BRENNAN, Jr., 7 Greenwood Court, 
Utica, N. Y. ; Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2. 



EDOUARD ALFRED BRODEUR, Jr., 235 Hamilton Street, 
Worcester, Mass.; Sodality 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Worces- 
ter Club. 



JAMES EUGENE BRYAN, 77 Adams Street, Rochester, N. Y.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Cross and Scroll 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 

CARL EDWARD BUCKLEY, 25 Allenwood Road, Great 
Neck, N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Cross and 
Scroll 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2; Metro- 
politan Club 1, 2; Riding Club 2. 

CIRO GREGORY BUONOCORE, Maple Avenue, North Ha- 
ven, Conn.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary 
Society; Italian Academy 1; Riding Club 2. 

JOHN T. BURKE, 129 Howard Street, Rockland, Mass.; So- 
dality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Boston Club 2; Brockton. 
Club 1. 



DANIEL F. BURNS, Jr., 131 North Essex Avenue, Orange, 
N. J. ; Dramatic Society 1, 2 ; Playshop 1, 2 ; Scientific Society 
2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; German Academy; New Jersey Club 
1, 2. 

EUGENE P. BURNS, 78 Spring Park Avenue, Jamaica Plain, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Track 2; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2; Boston Club 1, 2; Quarterdeck Club 1, 2. 

WALTER WILLIAM BYRNES, 129 Bellevue Avenue, Spring- 
field, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Scientific 
Society 2 ; Intramural Sports 1 ; Springfield Club. 



DONALD P. BROWN, 54 Longfellow Road, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Scientific Society 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 



JAMES EDGAR BRUNS, 270 Park Avenue, New York City; 
Sodality 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2; Playshop 1, 2; History 
Academy 1, 2 ; Cross and Scroll 1, 2 ; Sanctuary Society 2 ; 
Metropolitan Club. 



EDWARD FRANCIS CAFFREY, 42 Hemlock Street, Brock- 
ton, Mass.; Sectional Club; Brockton Club; Track 1; Intra- 
mural Sports 1; N. R. O. T. C. 1, 2. 

JOHN M. CAHILL, 35 Crowninshield Road, Brookline, Mass.; 
Irish Cultural Academy 2 ; Camera Club 2 ; Boston Club ; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2; Knights of Columbus 2. 



CI 



a s 



s of Nineteen Forty-fiv 




SOPHOMORE C 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. J. H. Galea, R. J. Asman, J. E. Bryan, Rev. Father Donaldson, S.J., T. K. Lightcap, J. E. Moriarty, J. M. 
Manahan. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. C. C. Bingham, S. W. Brennan, E. M. Davin, J. M. Collier, J. F. Nolan, P. D. Murphy, R. 
W. Rousseau, P. B. Walsh. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. J. J. Walter, J. G. Heffernon, E. P. Burns, J. J. Marshall, R. S. Sweeney, 

T. L. O'Neil, R. E. O'Leary. 



JOHN J. CALDON, 159 Main Street, Agawam, Mass.; Spring- 
field Club 1, 2; N. R. O. T. C. 1, 2. 



FRANCIS H1LLORY CARROLL, Dover, N. H.; Football 1, 2; 
New Hampshire Club. 



GEORGE G. CARROLL, 188 Parkside Avenue, Rochester, 
N. Y.; Sodality 1, 2; Yacht Club 1, 2; Albany Club; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2; N. R. O. T. C. 1, 2. 



GERALD KEELING CASSIDY, 3521 Rittenhouse Street, 
N. W., Washington, D. C; Sodality 1, 2; Yacht Club 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2; Glee Club Manager 1; Philharmonic 
Manager 1; Band Manager 1, 2. 



FELIX GEORGE CATALDO, 103 Washington Street, Frank- 
lin, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 



JOHN MARTIN COLLIER, Lakeland, Grenlock, N. J.; So- 
dality 1, 2; Purple Patcher 1; Tomahawk 1; History Acad- 
emy 1, 2; Camera Club 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary 
Society 1 ; Essex Club. 

MICHAEL W. CONNOLLY, 812 Avenue C, Bayonne, N. J.; 
Baseball 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Purple Key 1, 2; Outing 
Club 1 ; Mission Crusade 1 ; Essex Club. 

WILLIAM MARTIN CONNOLLY, 20 Thomas Street, Jamaica 
Plain, Mass.; Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 

CHARLES HENRY CONNOR, 7321 Indiana Avenue, Chicago, 
111. ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Chicago Club, Sec- 
retary 2; Quarterdeck Club; N. R. O. T. C. 1, 2. 

JAMES ROBERT CONNORS, 30 Glenbrook Road, Morris 
Plains, N. J.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; N. R. O. 
T. C. Beacon 1, 2. 



VINCENT CELENTANO, 31 Atwater Street, New Haven, 
Conn.; Sodality 1, 2; Band 1, 2; Crusaders 1, 2. 



DOMINIC R. CIRINCIONE, 827 Strong Street, Schenectady, 
N. Y. ; Sodality 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Mission Crusade; 
Albany Club. 



JOHN JOSEPH CLANCY, Fort Fairfield, Me.; Maine Club 
1, 2. 



PHILIP J. COGSWELL, 122 Kendig Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2 ; Intramural Debating 1, 2 ; History Academy 1, 
2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Worcester Club. 

JOHN JOSEPH COHAN, 1 Lucian Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality 2 ; Worcester Undergraduate Club. 



ROBERT THOMAS COONEY, 39 Maplewood Avenue, Pitts- 
field, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Golf 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2 ; Berkshire Club. 

THOMAS PAUL COPPINGER, 22 Tyler Avenue, West Med- 
ford, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; History 
Academy 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Sanctuary Society 1, 2 ; 
Boston Club. 

FRANCIS J. CORSINO, Hartford, Conn.; Sodality 1; Intra- 
mural Debating 1 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Sanctuary Society 1 ; 
Mission Crusade 1, 2; Italian Academy 1; Labor Academy 
2; Hartford Club. 

JOHN B. COUGHLIN, 409 High Street, Middletown, Conn.; 
Scientific Society 2 ; Intramural Sports 1,2; Quarterdeck Club 
1, 2; N. R. O. T. C. Dance Committee 1, Chairman 2; Hartford 
Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-five 




SOPHOMORE D 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. R. G. McDonald, F. J. Woodtke, T. P. Coppinger, Rev. Mr. Fuir, S.J., J. P. Morgan, J. J. O'Coin, L. J. 
Hession. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. A. C. Greco, E. F. Yurkiewicz, J. A. Murphy, J. J. Price, Jr., J. J. Dowd, Jr., R. W. Puentes. 
Third Row, leit to right: Messrs. P. J. Cogswell, J. J. Mara, J. D. Breslin, P. B. Sullivan, R. F. Mulqueen, L. P. Finn, F. J. Mulligan. 



WILLIAM M. COUSINS, Jr., 196 Deerfield Drive, Rochester, 
N. Y. ; Sodality 1,2; Intramural Debating 1 ; Dramatic Society 
1, Secretary 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Sanctuary Society 1, 2 ; 
Band 1, 2. 

EDWARD JOHN CURTIN, Station 38V 2 , South Windsor, 
Conn.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 
1, 2 ; Hartford Club. 

JOSEPH W. CUSMANO, 41 Jefferson Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; 
Sodality 2 ; Scientific Society 1 ; Intramural Sports 2 ; Outing 
Club 1; Metropolitan Club 1. 

EDWIN MARKHAM DAVIN, 8 Benefit Terrace, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Cross and Scroll 
2 ; German Academy 2 ; Worcester Club. 

ROBERT JOSEPH DAVIS, 3609 Darwin Avenue, Cheviot, O. ; 
Intramural Debating 1; Baseball 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Mission Crusade 1, 2; Ohio Club. 



ROBERT LUCIAN DAVIS, 25 Clark Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality 2 ; Worcester Undergraduate Club. 



JOSE A. DIAZ, Box 21, Utuado, Puerto Rico; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2 ; Sanctuary Society 1 ; Choir 1 ; Assistant Football 
Manager 2. 

HENRY TIRRILL DICKIE, 3624 Cantrell Road, N. E., Atlanta, 
Ga. ; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; History Academy 
1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Labor Academy 1; Mason-Dixon 
Club. 

JOHN DiGANGI, 63 Beaver Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Foot- 
ball 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1; Glee Club 1, 2; Choir 1, 2. 

BERNARD DiLORENZO, 213 Easton Avenue, Waterbury, 
Conn. ; Sodality 2 ; Intramural Sports 1 ; Mission Crusade 2 ; 
Waterbury Club. 

JOHN P. DOLAN, Jr., 218 Common Street, Walpole, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Yacht Club 1, 2; Tennis 1, 2; Golf 1, 2; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2; Labor Academy 2; N. R. 

0. T. C. 1, 2; Boston Club. 

DANIEL LAFAYETTE DONOVAN, Jr., 7120 Coles Avenue, 
Chicago, 111.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Tomahawk 
1; Tennis 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; N. R. O. T. C. Beacon 

1, 2 ; Pistol Team 2 ; Chicago Club. 



JOSEPH FRANCIS DEEGAN, Jr., 75 Lewis Street, Perth 
Amboy, N. J. ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Dramatic Society 1 ; Playshop 1 ; 
Tomahawk 1, 2; Yacht Club, Secretary 1, Rear Commodore 2; 
History Academy 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Sanctuary Society 
1, 2; Outing Club 1; Glee Club 2; Choir 2; New Jersey Club. 



EDWARD JAMES DEGNAN, 29 Killdeer Road, Hamden, 
Conn.; Track 1; Mission Crusade 1. 



THOMAS BRENDAN DELANEY, 40 Kingsbury Street, 
Worcester, Mass.; Sodality; Worcester Club; German Club. 



HENRY CLEMENT DONNELLY, 20 Abbott Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass. ; Sodality 2 ; History Academy 1 ; Intramural Sports 2 ; 
Mission Crusade 2 ; German Academy 1 ; Labor Academy 1 ; 
Worcester Club. 

JAMES J. DOWD, 67 Fairfield Avenue, Holyoke, Mass.; So- 
dality 2; Tomahawk 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2 ; Holyoke Club. 

GEORGE C. DOWNEY, 108 Burncoat Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; History Academy 2; French Academy 1, 
2; Worcester Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-five 




SOPHOMORE E 
First Row, left to right: Messrs. R. J. Griffin, J. F. Kilcoyne, J. M. Kilcoyne, Rev. Father Sullivan, S.J., L. F. Harrington, J. B. Healy, 
E. M. Rutledge. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. P. V. Garofoli, B. Di Lorenzo, L. J. Battista, T. B. Galligan, P. A. Klein, R. A. 
Howard, J. M. Ryan, J. E. Roe, D. R. Cirincione. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. R. L. Lynch, T. F. Kieran, H. T. Dickie, H. C. 

Donnelly, H. S. Banach, W. J. Heinig, J. W. Keating. 



FREDERICK THOMAS DOYLE, West Roxbury, Mass.; So- 
dality 1, 2; Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; French 
Academy 1. 

JOHN PAUL DRISCOLL, 881 Plymouth Avenue, Fall River, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1; French Academy 1, 2. 

JOHN RYDER DRISCOLL, Georgetown, Conn.; Sodality 1; 
Intramural Debating 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 

JOSEPH J. DUDENHOEFER, 4492 Maryland Avenue, Shore- 
wood, Wis. ; Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Dramatic So- 
ciety 1; Purple 1, 2; Tomahawk 1, 2; Track 1; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2; Labor Academy 1, 2; Wisconsin 
Club. 



FRANCIS GERARD FERRICK, 143 Wegman Parkway, Jersey 
City, N. J.; Sodality 1, 2; Scientific Society 2; Track 1, 2; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Glee Club 2; German Academy; Essex 
Club. 



LEO PATRICK FINN, 37 Elmwood Avenue, Waterbury, 
Conn. ; Dramatic Society 1 ; Cross and Scroll 1 ; Waterbury 
Club. 



GEORGE EDWARD FLAHERTY, 18 Oak Hill Road, Saugus, 
Mass.; Football 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 1. 

EDWARD R. FLEMMA, 1244 Hilton Avenue, Utica, N. Y.; 
Scientific Society 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Glee Club 2; 
Choir 1. 



JOSEPH LEO DUFFY, Jr., 190 Pleasant Street, Arlington 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Tomahawk, Photography Editor 1, 2 
Scientific Society 1, 2; Yacht Club 1, 2; Camera Club 1, 2 
Tennis 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; German Club 1, 2; Boston 
Club. 

HAYDON ROBERTSON DUFFY, 3107 North Hackett Ave- 
nue, Milwaukee, Wis. ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; 
Scientific Society 1, 2 ; History Academy 1, 2 ; Class Secretary 
1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2; Labor Academy 1; 
German Academy 1, 2; Wisconsin Club. 

WALTER JOSEPH EGAN, 111 Warren Street, Arlington, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, Vice-President; 
Purple Patcher 2; Tomahawk 1, 2; Yacht Club 1, 2; Cross 
and Scroll 1 ; Track 1 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Sanctuary So- 
ciety 1, 2; French Academy 1; N. R. O. T. C. Beacon 1, 2; 
Quarterdeck Club 1, 2; Boston Club. 



WILLIAM JOSEPH FOLEY, 388 Fourth Street, South Boston, 
Mass.; Football 1; Intramural Sports 1. 

THOMAS AQUINAS FORAN, 4140 Washington Boulevard, 
Chicago, 111.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Mission 
Crusade 2; N. R. O. T. C. 1, 2; Chicago Club. 

RAYMOND O. FREDETTE, 15 Oak Street, Uxbridge, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2 ; Worcester Club. 

ROBERT EDWARD GAFFNEY, 270 Brooklawn Terrace, Fair- 
field, Conn. ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Sanctuary 
Society 1; Glee Club 1, 2; Choir 1; Band 1, 2. 

JOHN H. GALEA, 60 Myrtle Avenue, Albany, N. Y.; Intra- 
mural Debating 1; Tomahawk 1, 2; French Academy 2; Albany 
Club. 



EDWARD M. FERGUSON, 98 Dover Parkway, Stewart Manor, 
L. I., N. Y. ; Tennis 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; German 
Academy 1, 2 ; Metropolitan Club. 



GEORGE G. GALLAGHER, 283 First Avenue, Highland Park, 
N. J.; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Essex 
Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-five 




SOPHOMORE F 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. D. A. Donohue, A. R. Aubuchon, Q. Rollo, J. F. Deegan, Rev. Father Cummings, S.J., E. W. Liphardt, 
E. J. Keating, M. P. Meads, W. J. Foley. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. H. J. McMahon, R. W. Colby, P. C. Larkin, H. P. Osborne, 
M. J. Lonsway, F. J. Waickman, R. C. Lyddy, R. D. Blum, W. C. Layton, J. D. Sullivan, M. A. Lillis, G. M. Zimmermann. Third Row, 
left to right: Messrs. W. M. Connolly, J. R. Jenusaitis, W. J. Hedges, D. L. Donovan, P. A. Vatter, J. J. Dudenhoefer, C. E. Buckley, 

O. J. Blaber, T. J. Langan, R. O. Fredette, C. C. Baxter. 



THOMAS BERNARD GALLIGAN, 160 East 32nd Street, 
New York, N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; His- 
tory Academy 1 ; Intramural Sports 1,2; Sanctuary Society 1,2; 
N. R. O. T. C. Drill Team 1; Quarterdeck Club 1, 2; Assistant 
Football Manager 1, 2 ; Metropolitan Club. 

EDWARD JOHN GALUSKA, 76 Raymond Avenue, Paw- 
tucket, R. I.; Sodality 1, 2; Football 1, 2; Intramural Sports 
1, 2. 

PETER V. J. GARAFOLI, 20 Burdett Street, Clinton, Mass.; 

Sodality 1, 2; Italian Academy 1, 2; St. Ignatius Loyola Club; 
"Worcester Club. 



JOHN T. GARRITY, 3 Channing Way, Worcester, Mass. ; So- 
dality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; History Academy 2; N. R. 

0. T. C. 1, 2; Worcester Club. 

EDWARD F. GARVIN, 24 Day Spring Avenue, Hamden, 
Conn.; Sodality 1; Scientific Society 1, 2; Intramural Sports 

1, 2; Band 1, 2. 

JAMES A. GETTINGS, 256 McKinley Avenue, New Haven, 
Conn.; Scientific Society 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; German 
Academy 1, 2; New Haven Club. 

RAYMOND EDWARD GORMAN, 42 Brookfield Street, Man- 
chester, Conn.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2 ; Outing Club, Vice-President 1, 2 ; Choir 1 ; Hart- 
ford Club. 

ANTHONY C. GRECO, 51 Sheldon Terrace, New Haven, 
Conn.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Choir 1, 2. 

FRANCIS XAVIER GRIFFIN, 76 Illsley Street, Portland, Me. ; 
Sodality 1; Football 1, 2. 



ROBERT JAMES GRIFFIN, 376 Prospect Avenue, Hartford, 
Conn.; Sodality 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; French Academy 
1,2; Hartford Club. 

JOHN W. C. GUTHRIE, 55 Van Ness Road, Belmont, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2 ; Yacht Club 1, 2 ; Baseball 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 
1, 2 ; Labor Academy 1, 2 ; N. R. O. T. C. 1, 2 ; Boston Club. 

GERARD ANTHONY HALPIN, 57 Highfield Road, Quincy, 
Mass.; Yacht Club 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Boston Club. 

JOSEPH B. HANNON, 108 Goodwin Street, Bristol, Conn.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Waterbury 
Club, Treasurer 1, 2. 

JOSEPH H. HARNEY, 160 Ocean Street, Lynn, Mass.; Sodal- 
ity 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; North Shore Club. 

LEO F. HARRINGTON, 126 Bay View Avenue, Salem, Mass.; 
Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 

JOHN B. HEALY, 163 Fire Island Avenue, Babylon, L. I., 
N. Y.; Yacht Club 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 
1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH HEDGES, 1312 Lakewood Avenue, 
Lima, O.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Tomahawk 
1, 2; Intramural Sports 1. 

JAMES G. HEFFERNAN, 1394 Troy Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.; 

Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Mission Crusade 1, 2; 
Metropolitan Club. 

FERDINAND ALEXANDER HEINIGE, 42 Columbus Ave- 
nue, Little Ferry, N. J. ; Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Sci- 
entific Society 1, 2 ; History Academy 2 ; Camera Club 1, 2 ; 
Tennis 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; German Academy 1, 2; 
New Jersey Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-five 




SOPHOMORE ECONOMICS A 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. J. L. Hines, J. T. Burke, J. E. Ward, Rev. Father McDermott, S.J., J. A. Quigley, J. P. Dolan, Jr., J. R. 
Connors. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. R. E. O'Connell, B. J. Abdella, E. P. Meyer, J. S. Tutino, R. J. O'Shea, P. G. O'Reilly, R. M. 
Botts. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. W. W. Shelbourne, Jr., F. S. McGaughey, Jr., R. W. Lebling, J. L. O'Brien, J. R. Shields, A. G. 

Hull, J. C. Guthrie. 



WILLIAM JOSEPH HEINIG, 42 Henry Street, Clinton, Mass. ; 
Sodality 1, 2; St. Ignatius Loyola Club 2. 



LEO JOSEPH HESSION, 1 1 1 Dickerman Road, Newton High- 
lands, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Yacht Club 
2; Cross and Scroll 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Outing Club 
1, 2; Choir 2 ; N. R. O. T. C. Beacon, Editor 1; Naval Ball 
Committee 1 ; Boston Club. 



FRANCIS ARTHUR HICKEY, 34 Devens Street, Greenfield, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1; Cross and Scroll, 
Sergeant-at-Arms 2 ; Intramural Sports 1 ; Sanctuary Society 1, 
2; Choir 1; French Academy 1, 2. 

THOMAS ALBERT HICKEY, 1 Westminster Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Class Vice-President 1, 2; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2 ; N. R. O. T. C, Quarterdeck Club, Beacon and 
Dance Committee 1, 2. 



JOHN R. JENUSAITIS, 21 Chipman Street, Waterbury, Conn.; 
Yacht Club 1 ; Intramural Sports 1 ; Sanctuary Society 1, 2 ; 
Choir 1 ; French Academy 1 ; Waterbury Club. 

GEORGE A. JOSEPH, Stockbridge Road, Great Barrington, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2 ; Scientific Society 2; Sanctuary Society 1; 
Philharmonic 1, 2; German Academy 1, 2; Berkshire Club. 

THOMAS JOSEPH JOYCE, 59 Pleasant Street, Clinton, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Mission Crusade 1, 2; 
Worcester Club 1, 2. 



EDWARD JOSEPH KEATING, 6 Squanto Road, Quincy, 
Mass.; Irish Cultural Academy 1; Yacht Club 1, 2; Cross and 
Scroll 1; Boston Club 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 

JOHN WILLIAM KEATING, 28 Marlborough Road, Roches- 
ter, N. Y. ; Choir 2; History Academy 1. 



JOHN LEONARD HINES, 136 Arden Road, Waterbury, 
Conn. ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Waterbury Club. 



PAUL FREDERICK HOPPER, 1695 Tibbets Avenue, Troy, 
N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2; Tomahawk 2; 
Scientific Society 1, 2; Track 1; Tennis 1, 2; Intramural Sports 
1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Band 1, 2; German Academy 1, 2; 
N. R. O. T. C. Beacon; Rifle Team, Drill Team, Quarterdeck 
Club 1, 2; Albany Club. 

RICHARD A. HOWARD, Jr., 66 Coran Street, Hamden, 
Conn.; Assistant Football Manager 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1; 
Sanctuary Soicety 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2. 

JOHN E. HURLEY, 174 Hopkins Place, Longmeadow, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 



ARTHUR G. KEHOE, 188 81st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; So- 
dality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Dramatic Society 1; Scien- 
tific Society 2; Cross and Scroll 1, 2. 



NICHOLAS JOSEPH KELLER, 434 66th Street, West New 
York, N. J.; Sodality 1, 2; Tomahawk 1, 2; History Academy 
1; Cross and Scroll 1; Track 1, 2; German Academy 1, 2; 
Intramural Debating 1; Scientific Society 2. 

JAMES D. KELLY, 95 Highland Avenue, Somerville, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Football 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 

WILLIAM L. KELLICK, 2013 13th Street, Niagara Falls, 
N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2; Tomahawk 1; History Academy 1, 2; 
Class President 1, 2; Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanc- 
tuary Society 1, 2; Niagara Frontier Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-five 




SOPHOMORE ECONOMICS B 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. J. E. Hurley, P. P. Rosetti, R. L. Tynan, Rev. Father Hart, S.J., E. J. Riley, E. J. Curtin, J. C. Tobin. 

Second Row, left to right: Messrs. J. R. Tellson, J. A. Alvarez, P. R. Kneeland, R. E. Dwyer, F. J. McCabe, F. J. Corsino. Third Row, left 

to right: Messrs. T. F. Loughlin, F. H. Murray, Jr., T. S. Dunstan, J. W. Stodder, W. C. Walsh, G. C. Downey. 



JOHN W. KENNEDY, 22 Dearborn Street, Medford, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Quarterdeck Club 1, 2; N. R. O. T. C. Drill 
Team 1, 2; Boston Club 1, 2. 

WILLIAM THURSTON KENNY, Sharon, Conn. ; Sodality 1 ; 
2; Dramatic Society 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary So- 
ciety 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2. 



JAMES JOSEPH LALLY, 153 Oliver Road, Waban, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Scientific Society 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2; N. R. O. T. C. Quar- 
terdeck Club, Treasurer 1, 2. 



ROBERT EDWARD LAMBERT, 2 Ready Avenue, Lowell, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Football 1, 2. 



JOHN W. KICKHAM, 91 Crowninshield Road, Brookline, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Dramatic Society 
1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Band, Assistant Manager 2; Boston 
Club 1, 2. 



JOHN MICHAEL KILCOYNE, 10 Cross Street, Clinton, 
Mass.; Sodality 1. 

JOSEPH FRANCIS KILCOYNE, 95 Front Street, Clinton, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; St. Ignatius Loyola Club. 



ROBERT JAMES LANAGAN, 35 Lincoln Street, Spencer. 
Mass. ; Scientific Society 2 ; Worcester Club. 



JAMES MONTAGUE LANDRIGAN, 125 Vernon Street, 
Wakefield, Mass.; Football 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 



THEODORE JOHN LANGAN, 94 Paulin Boulevard, Leonia, 

N. J. ; Sodality 1 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Intramural Sports 
1, 2; Labor Academy 1. 



JOHN ROBERT KILSHEIMER, 251 Sheridan Avenue, Mt. 
Vernon, N. Y. ; Scientific Society 1, 2; Tennis 1, 2; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2; Band 1 ; N. R. O. T. C. Beacon, 1, 2; Metropoli- 
tan Club. 



JOHN MURRAY KINANE, 13 Oread Place, Worcester, Mass.; 
Worcester Club. 



FREDERICK L. KIRK, 1041 Nelson Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. ; Sodality 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 

PHILIP R. KNEELAND, 5 Shepard Street, Worcester, Mass.; 

Intramural Debating 1 ; Worcester Club. 



ROLAND FRANCIS LARGAY, 161 Hillside Avenue, Water 
bury, Conn.; Sodality 1, 2; History Academy 1, 2; Intramural 
Sports 1; Knights of Columbus 1, 2; Mission Crusade 1; Water- 
bury Club. 



PHILIP CHARLES LARKIN, 19 Greenbriar Street, Springfield, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; N. R. 
O. T. C. 1, 2. 



JOHN JOSEPH LAYDEN, 17 Elm Street, Whitehall, N. Y.; 

Sodality 1, 2 ; Cross and Scroll 1 ; Sanctuary Society 1, 2 ; 
Albany Club. 



EDWARD J. KROYAK, 7 Redding Court, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; History Academy 1, 2; Tennis 1, 2; French 
Academy 1 ; Worcester Club. 



WILLIAM C. LAYTON, Jr., 83 Belle Avenue, Maywood, 
N. J.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Track 1, 2; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2 ; N. R. O. T. C. Ring Committee. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-five 




SOPHOMORE ECONOMICS C 

First Row, right to left: Messrs. G. K. Cassidy, H. E. Wilkinson, M. A. McGee, J. E. Benton, Rev. Father Devlin, S.J., H. J. Gillespie, 
G. G. Gallagher, J. W. Kickham, E. A. Salmon. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. M. F. Hastings, F. L. Kirk, J. V. Navickas, R. J. 
Sullivan, P. J. Whitney, E. J. Marrone, Jr., F. J. Maloney, Jr., W. T. Kenney, T. A. Hickey, Jr. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. G. A. 
McEvoy, T. F. Macdonald, J. D. Kearney, E. A. Leverone, Jr., L. W. O'Brien, C. J. Neligon, G. A. Halpin. 



ROBERT WILLIAM LEBLING, 5604 Edgemoore Lane, Beth- 
esda, Md.; Sodality 1, 2; Yacht Club 1, 2; History Academy 
1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Knights of Columbus 1, 2; Mis- 
sion Crusade 1 ; Mason-Dixon Club. 



ROBERT LEONARD, 582 Hanover Street; Sodality 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2; New Hampshire Club. 



ROBERT L. LYNCH, 178 Conton Street, Stoughton, Mass.; 
History Academy 1; Glee Club 1, 2; Band 1; French Acad- 
emy 2. 

RAYMOND C. LYDDY, 190 Ann Street, Bridgeport, Conn.; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2; Glee Club 2; Choir 1, 2; Bridgeport 
Club 2; Cheer Leader 1, 2 



EUGENE A. LEVERONE, Jr., 419 Worcester Road, Framing- 
ham, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Loyola Club 1; Worcester Club. 



THOMAS FLYNN MACDONALD, 1356 Quincy Shore Bou- 
levard, Quincy, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Scientific Society 1; Yacht 
Club 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 2 ; Outing Club 1 ; Boston Club. 



JOSEPH LIGHTCAP, 3108 Avenue I, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Toma- 
hawk 1; Scientific Society 2; Track 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 



THOMAS K. LIGHTCAP, 1 Favitt Street, East Longmeadow, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Band 1, 2; Spring- 
field Club. 



FRED J. MALONEY, Jr., 41 Marland Road, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality 1; Intramural Sports 2; Worcester Club 1, 2; Quar- 
terdeck Club 1, Secretary 2. 

JOSEPH MICHAEL MANAHAN, 20 Colton Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Worcester Club 1, 2; German Club 2. 



MARK A. LILLIS, 625 East Avenue, Lockport, N. J.; Sodality 
1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; N. R. O. 
T. C. Ring Committee; Buffalo Club. 



EDWARD WALTER LIPHARDT, 6650 North Damen Ave- 
nue, Chicago, III.; Tomahawk 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Chi- 
cago Club 1, 2; N. R. O. T. C. Beacon 1, 2. 



KENNETH GEORGE LOCKWOOD, 42 Freeland Street, 
Worcester, Mass.; Scientific Society 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Worcester Club. 



ROBERT STEPHEN MANOGUE, 81 Main Street, Ritt- 
man, O. ; Tennis 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Labor Academy 1. 

JOHN JOSEPH MARA, Jr., 154 Delmont Avenue, Worcester, 
Mass. ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Worcester Under- 
graduate Club. 

JAMES JOSEPH MARSHALL, 11 Jaques Avenue, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Mission Crusade 
2; Worcester Undergraduate Club; N. R. O. T. C. 1, 2. 

JOHN EDWARD McAULIFFE, 56 Fruit Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Worcester Club. 



MAURICE J. LONSWAY, 3 Ridgetop Drive, St. Louis, Mo.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Tomahawk 1, 2; History Academy 1; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Outing Club 1; Choir 1; 
German Club 1. 



FRANCIS JOSEPH McCABE, 3214 Post Road, Apponaug, 
R. I.; Outing Club 1; Philharmonic 1, 2; Band 1, 2; Rhode 
Island Club; N. R. O. T. C. 1, 2; Crusaders 1, 2; Quarterdeck 
Club. 



Class of Nineteen Fnrty-five 







SOPHOMORE ECONOMICS D 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. C. F. Reardon, E. J. Schrowang, G. G. Carroll, Rev. Father Hart, S.J., J. F. Murphy, C. G. Buonocore, 
W. F. Pringle. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. W. J. McManus, J. M. Harney, L. J. Rogers, W. M. Cousins, Jr., R. F. Largay, J. N. 
Reardon, J. C. Smith. Third Row. left to right: Messrs. N. L. Allard, T. S. Tolin, C. E. Poehnert, R. J. Biladeau, J. J. Clancy, J. E. Reilly. 



JAMES MARTIN McCABE, 230 Branford Street, Hartford, 
Conn. ; Tennis 1 ; Hartford Club. 

ROBERT W. McCHESNEY, 109 Summerfield Road, Chevy 
Chase, Md.; Sodality 1, 2, Chairman Contact Committee; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2 ; Band 1, 2; Mason-Dixon Club. 

RICHARD G. MCDONALD, 10 Hillside Drive, Gloucester, 
Mass. ; Sodality 2 ; Cross and Scroll 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 
2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Philharmonic 1, 2; Choir 1, 2; Mis- 
sion Crusade 1, 2. 

GEORGE ALBERT McEVOY, Jr., 10 Hammondswood Road, 
Chestnut Hill, Mass.; Tomahawk 1; Yacht Club 1; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2; Boston Club; Beacon 1, Editor-in-Chief 2; Quar- 
terdeck Club. 

JOHN PETER McGALLOWAY, 214 East Division Street, 
Fond du Lac, Wis.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanc- 
tuary Society 1, 2; Band 2; Wisconsin Club. 

FRANK McGAUGHEY, 2515 Habershan Road, Atlanta, Ga.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Mason-Dixon Club. 

MARCUS A. McGEE, 41 Birch Street, Worcester, Mass.; So- 
dality 1, 2; Worcester Undergraduate Club. 

EDWARD B. McGRATH, Windsor Locks, Conn.; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2. 

HENRY J. McMAHON, 15 Myrtle Street, Woburn, Mass.; 
Intramural Debating 1, 2; Football 1, Baseball 1, Intramural 
Sports 1 2 ; Band 1. 

WILLIAM J. McMANUS, 109 Franklin Street, Kingston, 
N. J.; Camera Club 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Outing Club 
1, 2; Labor Academy 1, 2; Albany Club. 



EDWIN P. MEYER, 418 Chandler Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 2; Mission Crusade 2; Worces- 
ter Club; N. R. O. T. C. Quarterdeck Club. 

JOSEPH PAUL MORGAN, 14 Sever Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Worcester Undergraduate 
Club. 

JOHN EDWARD MORI ARTY, 17 Suffield Street, Worcester, 
Mass. ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Mission Crusade 
1, 2; Worcester Undergraduate Club. 

JOSEPH M. MOYNAHAN, 269 Belmont Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality 1; Intramural Sports 1; Mission Crusade 2; 
Worcester Undergraduate Club. 

ALFRED EMMANUEL MULKERN, 48l/ 2 Greenleaf Street, 
Portland, Me.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Irish Cul- 
tural Academy 1; History Academy 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 
2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Choir 1; Labor Academy 1, 2; Maine 
Club; Portland Club; French Academy 1, 2; Le Croise 1, 2. 

FRANCIS JAMES MULLIGAN, Jr., 3 Clifton Avenue, Salem, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Tomahawk 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2; French Academy 1; North Shore Club. 

JOHN ARTHUR MURPHY, 131 Riverside Drive, New York, 
N. Y.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Outing Club 1; 
French Academy 1 ; Metropolitan Club. 

JOHN F. MURPHY, 15 Myrtle Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2. 

PAUL DANIEL MURPHY, Jr., 57 Broadway, Rockville Cen- 
ter, N. Y. ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Cross and Scroll 1 ; Toma- 
hawk 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Philharmonic 1, 2; Band 1, 2; 
Metropolitan Club; German Academy 1, 2; Crusaders 1, 2. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-fiv 




SOPHOMORE SCIENCE A 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. E. B. McGrath, J. F. Purcell, Jose A. Diaz, Gilberto Lopez de Victoria, Rev. Father Ahearn, S.J., B. E. 
Novia, E. R. Flemma, J. V. Cusmano, F. A. Heinige. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. P. V. O'Leary, J. M. Moynahan, A. G. Signorelli, 
D. P. Brown, P. W. Braunstein, F. G. Cataldo, T. W. Grzebien, Jr., A. W. Camire, J. E. McAuliffe. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. 
H. R. Duffy, A. C. Smith, J. A. Gettings, R. J. Banker, C. W. Valentine, A. R. Bottone, E. J. Degnan, J. J. Cohan. 



RICHARD LEO MURPHY, 252 Water Street, Clinton, Mass.; 
Sodality 1; Worcester Club; St. Ignatius Loyola Club 2. 

FRANCIS H. MURRAY, Jr., New Bedford, Mass.; Sodality 
1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2; Cross 
and Scroll 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Choir 1; Labor Academy 1, 2. 

JAMES G. MURRAY, 26 Portmouth Street, Rockville Centre, 
L. I., N. Y. ; Sodality 1, Secretary 2; Intramural Debating 2; 
Purple 2 ; Cross and Scroll 1,2; Intramural Sports 1,2; Knights 
of Columbus 1, 2; Mission Crusade 1, 2; Metropolitan Club. 



JOHN L. O'BRIEN, 1088 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y.; 
Sodality 1, 2, Secretary Staff; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Metro- 
politan Club; Quarterdeck Club, N. R. O. T. C, 1, 2. 

LAWRENCE WILLIAM O'BRIEN, 162 East 7th Street, Os- 
wego, N. Y.; Sodality 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2; History 
Academy 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; 
Glee Club 2 ; Band 2 ; French Academy 1 ; Central New York 
Club; Quarterdeck Club 1. 

JOHN J. O'COIN, 95 Downing Street, Worcester, Mass.; So- 
dality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 



CORNELIUS W. NELIGON, 120 Liberty Street, Cheshire, 
Conn. ; Hartford Club. 



JOHN F. NOLAN, 231 Grove Street, Worcester, Mass.; So- 
dality 2; Intramural Sports 1; Mission Crusade 1. 



PHILIP JOHN NOLAN, 3119 Farragut Road, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Football 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 



RICHARD MARTIN NOLAN, l63-67th Street, Niagara Falls, 
N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Tomahawk 2 ; 
Class Treasurer 1, 2; Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanc- 
tuary Society 1, 2; Niagara Frontier Club; N. R. O. T. C. 
Quarterdeck Club, Vice-President 2. 



ROBERT EDWARD O'CONNELL, 2727 Grant Boulevard, 
Syracuse, N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2. 

FRANCIS MICHAEL O'CONNOR, 645 Morris Street, Albany, 
N. Y.; Scientific Society 1, 2; Albany Club. 

PAUL VINCENT O'LEARY, 17 Fifth Avenue, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; N. R. O. T. C. 
1, 2. 

THOMAS LILLIS O'NEIL, Westfield, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; 
Intramural Debating 1 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Sanctuary So- 
ciety 1, 2 ; Springfield Club. 



JOHN B. NOONE, Jr., 46-36 24lst Street, Douglaston, L. I.; 
Sodality 1, Secretary 2 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Yacht Club 1 ; 
Cross and Scroll 1 ; Intramural Sports 1 ; Outing Club 1 ; French 
Academy 1 ; Labor Academy 1 ; New York Club 1 ; N. R. O. 
T. C. Rifle Team. 



BERNARD E. NOVIA, Box 544 Derby Line, Vt.; Sodality 
1, 2; Scientific Society 1; Intramural Sports 1. 



HOWARD PAUL OSBORN, 20 Dix Street, Worcester, Mass. 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic Society 2 
History Society 1, 2 ; Cross and Scroll 2 ; Mission Crusade 2 
Worcester Club 1, 2. 

ROBERT J. O'SHEA, 237 Appleton Street, Arlington, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2; Boston 
Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-five 




SOPHOMORE SCIENCE B 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. J. T. Palano, J. M. Kinnane, P. F. Hopper, Jr., K. R. Watson, C. H. Connor, E. S. Sunega, G. J. Still, T. 
A. Foran, D. A. Truland. Second Row. left to right: Messrs. J. J. Boursy, F. M. O'Connor, G. A. Joseph, J. M. Thompson, E. M. Fer- 
guson, R. J. Lanagan, E. F. Garvin, H. Wolff, Jr., J. J. Lally. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. J. A. Kilsheimer, F. G. Ferrick, J. W. 
Kennedy, Jr., D. F. Burns, T. H. Tracy, V. D. Celentano, R. S. Manogue, J. T. Riley. 



JOSEPH T. PALANO, 13 School Street, South Barre, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Scientific Society 1, 2; Worcester Club. 



JOHN VINCENT PHELAN, 49 Humphrey Street, Marble- 
head, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Purple Key 1, 2; North Shore Club. 



CHARLES E. POCHNERT, Jr., 100 LeMay Street, West Hart- 
ford, Conn.; Football 1; Baseball 1; Tennis 2; Intramural 
Sports 1 ; Hartford Club. 



JOHN J. PRICE, Jr., 88 Fern Circle, Waterbury, Conn.; So- 
dality 2 ; History Academy 2 ; Waterbury Club. 



WALTER F. PRINGLE, Jr., 165 East Main Street, Lenox, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Berkshire Club. 



ROY WILLIAM J. RIEL, 78 Prospect Street, Springfield, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Cross and Scroll 
1; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Choir 2; French Academy 1, 2; 
Springfield Club. 



FDWARD JOSEPH RIELY, Jr., 6 Grant Road, Salem, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; French Academy 1; 
N. R. O. T. C. Quarterdeck Club 1, 2; North Shore Club. 

JOHN EDWARD ROE, 1 Freeman Road, Albany, N. Y.; In- 
tramural Debating 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1; Intramural Sports 
1, 2; Band 1; Albany Club. 



L. JEROME ROGERS, 136 Sunset Avenue, Ridgewood, N. J.; 
Sodality 1. 2: Intramural Debating 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
N. R. O. T. C. Beacon 1, 2; Essex Club. 



ROBERT W. A. PUENTES, 464 Woodcliff Avenue., Hudson 
Heights, N. J. ; Sodality 1 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Sanctuary 
Society 1 ; Essex Club. 



QUINTINO ROLLO, 186 Pearl Street, Fitchburg, Mass.; So- 
dality 1 ; Philharmonic Orchestra 1 ; Band 1 ; St. Ignatius Loy- 
ola Club 1, 2; Fitchburg Club. 



JAMES FRANCIS PURCELL, 819 State Street, Schenectady, 
N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Albany Club, Sec- 
retary 1, 2. 

JOSEPH ALOYSIUS QUIGLEY, Jr., 18 Stratford Road, New 
Rochelle, N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; N. R. 
O. T. C. Quarterdeck Club 1, 2; Metropolitan Club. 



RICHARD WILFRED ROUSSEAU, 2055 Acushnet Avenue, 
New Bedford, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1 ; 
Dramatic Society 1, 2; Cross and Scroll 1; Intramural Sports 
1, 2; Sanctuary Society 2. 



EDWARD M. RUTLEDGE, 5 Corliss Avenue, Greenwich, 
N. Y. ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Albany Club. 



CHARLES FRANCIS REARDON, 549 Pleasant Street, Maiden, 
Mass.; N. R. O. T C. 1, 2; Boston Club. 



JOSEPH M. RYAN, 107 Riverside Drive, Utica, N. Y.; So- 
dality 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2; Choir 1. 



JOSEPH EDWARD REILLY, 11 East Brittania Street, Taun- 
ton, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2. 



EDWARD ANTHONY SALMON, 10 Shattuck Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Worcester 
Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-five 




SOPHOMORE EDUCATION AND HISTORY 

First Ron 1 , left to right: Messrs. R. F. Shortt, J. P. Ashe, T. M. Crowley, J. E. Blount, Rev. Father FitzGerald, S.J., G. J. Schum, R. F. 
Ball, G. E. Flaherty, M. W. Connolly. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. R. L. Murphy, J. J. Caldon, J. F. Lightcap, R. A. Barton, E. F. 
Caffrey, J. E. Doherty, R. L. Lambert, E. J. Galuska. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. A. J. Wizbicki, W. A. Swiacki, F. X. Griffin, J. M. 

Landrigan, P. P. Wickman, R. E. Lambert, J. S. DiGangi. 



DONALD W. SCHMITZ, Bay Crest, Huntington, L. I., N. Y.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Tomahawk 2; Track 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Manhattan Club. 



GERARD J. SCHUM, 207 Beach 149th Street, Belle Harbor, 
L. I., N. Y. ; Football 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Metropol- 
itan Club. 



WILLIAM W. SHELBOURNE, Jr., 122 Candee Avenue, Say- 
ville, L. I., N. Y. ; Yacht Club 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Outing Club 1, 2; N. R. O. T. C. Quarterdeck Club 1, 2; 
Essex Club. 



JOHN WESLEY STODDER, 227 South Green Bay Road, 
Highland Park, 111.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1; Dra- 
matic Society 1, 2; Tomahawk 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; 
Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Labor Academy 1, Secretary 2; N. R. 
O. T. C. Beacon 1, 2; Chicago Club. 

ROBERT JOSEPH SULLIVAN, 230 Osgood Street, North An- 
dover, Mass.; Football 1, 2; Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 



GEORGE JOSEPH STILL, 57 Congress Street, Bradford, Pa.; 
Sodality 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2; Mission 
Crusade 1, 2; Pennsylvania Club. 



ANDREW GEORGE SIGNORELLI, 59 Suydam Street, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. ; Sodality 1 ; Scientific Society 1 ; Intramural Sports 
1, 2; Metropolitan Club. 



EDWARD S. SUNEGA, Kingsbury Avenue, Rockville, Conn.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Scientific Society 1, 2; Track, Varsity Manager 
2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; German 
Academy 2. 



ALEXANDER C. SMITH, 978 Plandome Road, Manhasset, 
N. Y. ; Sodality 2 ; Intramural Debating 1 ; Scientific Society 1 ; 
Intramural Sports 2 ; French Academy 1 ; Metropolitan Club. 



ROBERT S. SWEENEY, 639 Central Avenue, Dunkirk, N. Y. ; 
Sodality 1, 2; Cross and Scroll 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2. 



ALEXANDER W. SMITH, 3403 Tuxedo Road, Atlanta, Ga.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Mason-Dixon Club. 



JAMES RICHARD TELLSON, 263 Kingsland Terrace, South 
Orange, N. J.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; N. R. O. 
T. C. Beacon Staff 1, 2; Essex Club. 



JAMES GORDON SMITH, 201 West Garden Street, Rome, 
N. Y. ; Sodality 2 ; Intramural Sports 2 ; Central New York 
Club. 



JOHN CHARLES TOBIN, 35 Fairlawn Avenue, Albany, 
N. Y. ; Intramural Sports 2 ; Sanctuary Society 2 ; Albany Club. 



JOHN FRANCIS SOLOPERTO, 12 Adams Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Mission Crusade 1, 2; Worcester Club. 



EDWARD MORTON TOLIN, 7XV Ranch, Tyrone, N. M.; 
Intramural Debating 1 ; Tomahawk 1 ; Football 1 ; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2. 



GEORGE STAVROS, 37 Hudson Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Intramural Debating 1 ; Intramural Sports 1 ; Worcester Club. 



THOMAS HENRY TRACY, 37 Enfield Street, Worcester, 
Mass. ; Sodality 1 ; Scientific Society 1 ; Worcester Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-five 




SOPHOMORE SOCIAL SCIENCE 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. R. J. Davis, T. V. McCarthy, J. V. Swan, J. W. Sharry, H. C. Sexton, R. A. Rigney, E. L. Reynolds. 
Second Row. left to right: Messrs. P. C. Keefe, R. E. Stample, O. P. Keenan, W. T. Moriarty, J. E. Mahoney, R. L. Horan, J. J. O'Leary. 
Third Row, left to right: Messrs: M. J. Lally, E. M. Brawley, F. H. Carroll, F. R. Rameaka, E. M. McGoldrick, J. M. Reynolds, D. W. 

Sullivan. 



DANIEL JOHN TRULAND, 21 Elm Street, Lancaster, N. H.; 
Sodality 1 ; Scientific Society 1 ; Outing Club 1 ; German Acad- 
emy 1, 2; New Hampshire Club. 



KENNETH RUSSEL WATSON, 45 Phelps Road, Ridgewood, 
N. J.; Scientific Society 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Essex 
Club. 



ROBERT LAWRENCE TYNAN, 490 Huron Avenue, Cam- 
bridge, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Boston 
Club. 



CHARLES H. W. VALENTINE, Bayview Avenue, Bayville, 
L. I., N. Y. ; History Academy 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Ger- 
man Academy 2 ; Metropolitan Club. 

PAUL A. VATTER, 154 Aldrich Street, Roslindale, Mass.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Dramatic Society 1, 2; Playshop, Secretary 1, 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2; N. R. O. T. C. 1, 2. 

FRANCIS J. WAICKMAN, 55 Clemmer Avenue, Akron O.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, Secretary; Tomahawk 1, 
2; Scientific Society 2; Cross and Scroll 1, 2; Intramural Sports 
1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2. 

PATRICK BRENDAN WALSH, 419 College Avenue, Mar- 
quette, Mich.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Debating 1, 2; Intra- 
mural Sports 1, 2. 



WILLIAM CHARLES WALSH, 19 Old Middlesex Road, Bel- 
mont, Mass.; Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 2; Boston Club. 



PAUL J. WHITNEY, 124 Bellevue Avenue, Melrose, Mass.; 
Track 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Boston Club, Treasurer 1, Sec- 
retary 2. 



HARVEY E. WILKINSON, 18 Lindbergh Avenue, Amster- 
dam, N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2 ; Intramural Sports 1, 2 ; Sanctuary 
Society 1, 2; Outing Club 1; French Academy 1; Albany Club; 
N. R. O. T. C. 1, 2. 



ALEXANDER WIZBICKI, 175 Russell Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Football 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2. 



HERMAN WOLFF, Jr., 800 Glenwood Avenue, Raleigh, 
N. C. ; Dramatic Society 1, 2; Scientific Society 2; Tennis 2; 
Intramural Sports 1, 2; Purple Key 1, 2; N. R. O. T. C. Quar- 
terdeck Club, President 1, 2. 



FREDERICK L. WOODTKE, 106 Linsley Avenue, Meriden, 
Conn.; Sodality 2; Intramural Sports 2. 



WILLIAM J. WALSH, 69 South Street, Westboro, Mass. ; So- 
dality 1; Intramural Sports 2. 



JOSEPH EDWARD WARD, 2 Burleigh Street, Houlton, Me.; 
Sodality 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2 ; N. R. 
O. T. C. Rifle Team 1, 2; Quarterdeck Club 1, 2; Riding Club 
2 ; Maine Club. 



MARTIN DONALD ZEWE, 135 Coolidge Road, Buffalo, 
N. Y. ; Sodality 1, 2; Sanctuary Society 1, 2; Niagara Frontier 
Club. 



GEORGE MICHAEL ZIMMERMAN, 591 Lafayette Avenue, 
Buffalo, N. Y.; Sodality 1. 2. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-five 



"Three Hundred and Ninety Two Freshmen Reg- 
ister on the Hill for Three Year College Course," 
proclaimed the first issue of the Tomahawk, and we 
of the Class of 1946 were officially welcomed to Holy 
Cross. With the dubious distinction of being the 
Hill's first wartime class, we settled down to an 
accelerated program of studies, intended to afford us 
the opportunity of a full college diploma before in- 
duction into the armed forces. However, due to the 
lowering of the draft age, we soon realized that very 
few, if any of us, would ever finish our course on Mt. 
St. James. It was with this sobering reflection that 
we began our life at Holy Cross, resolved to make 
our stay all the more profitable for its brevity; our 
devotions to our new Alma Mater all the more in- 
tense for the realization that we were to leave her 
soon. 

Perhaps nowhere was the spirit better exemplified 
than on the gridiron. For the first time Freshmen 
were allowed to try out for the varsity squad, and as 
evidence of their spirit and talent, four from our class 
won letters: Connor, McAfee, Strojny and Camp- 
bell. Close behind the lettermen came Kenny, Rug- 
giero, Kolasinski, Sweeney, Richards and Smith. How 
good were they? Ask the battered Boston College 
Eagle for one, who will tell you that it was the spirit 
and the drive of the Freshmen more than anything 
else which caused his gaudy plumage to be strewn 
all over the far reaches of Fenway Park. 

As is the yearly custom at Holy Cross, an honorary 
president is appointed for the Freshman Class from 
among the Seniors. This year Edward Gilmore was 
the choice, and a fortunate one it was for the Class 
of "forty-six." Showing from the outset a deep in- 
terest in our affairs, it was President Gilmore who 
inaugurated the practice of sending Purples and Tom- 
ahawks to the Holy Cross men in the armed forces. 
Freshmen Noonan and Jackson were chairmen for 
this drive. 

October brought the opening of the various clubs 
and activities, into which the Freshmen threw them- 
selves wholeheartedly. In the literary field we find 



Freshmen 

CLASS DF 194G 

EDWARD GILMORE, '43 
Honorary President 



several Freshmen on the Tomahawk Staff, while Don 
Brown was our sole contributor to the Purple. In 
the work for the Sodality, Bengs, Hayden, Read, 
Cashman, O'Connell and Murray, to mention but a 
few, were especially active, while under Rev. Paul 
Barry, S.J., a successful season was enjoyed by the 
Freshmen debaters. Although not very high in the 
final standings, our intramural football teams fur- 
nished the upperclassmen with many a busy after- 
noon. In a spiritual way, we found stimulus in the 
annual Retreat. The response to the Retreat, — con- 
ducted this year by Father Barry, — in point of fervor 
and sincerity was strictly in keeping with the gravity 
of the times. 

In a class so distinguished for its spirit, it was only 
proper for the seeds of spiritual and patriotic en- 
deavor to flourish. Three of our members, Frank 
Caffrey, Ed Gully and Ed Crowe, are already pursu- 
ing their studies for the sacred priesthood, while sev- 
eral others are soon to enter the various novitiates. 
On the military side, the Class of 1946 boasts over 
one hundred and twenty-five members accepted into 
the Naval R. O. T. C, with many others enlisted in 
the Army, Navy and Marine Reserves, still a further 
commentary on our patriotism and all around spirit. 

But now as we, the men of the Class of "forty-six" 
look ahead, we can foresee at best a few short months 
more at Holy Cross. Even in that brief space, how- 
ever, with such spirit as we have already shown, the 
Class of 1946 should one day rank among the noblest 
offspring of a noble mother. If spirit and devotion 
will do it, we cannot fail. 

John C. Cullen, '46. 




FRESHMAN A 

First Row. left to right: Messrs. J. C. Cullen, J. C. Dewing, R. J. O'Connell, Rev. Father Keane, S.J., J. G. Murray, M. A. Read, 
W. A. Fahey. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. J. E. O'Boyle, F. X. Donovan, J. F. Shea, J. A. Cassidy, J. E. Brooks, Jr., W. A. Ker- 
rigan, J. J. Flahive, J. D. Graziadei. R. S. Keller. Third Row. left to right: Messrs. H. A. Mallon, J. E. O'Connor, C. H. Netter, F. J. 

Caffrey, E. P. Noonan, R. R. Hamel, J. J. Cunha, L. H. Wagner. 



ABBOTT, RONALD WILLIAM. 43 Adams Street, East Hart- 
ford, Conn.; Sodality; Mission Crusade; Hartford Club. 



BALDO. HUMBERT SILVA. 95 Bellevue Street, New Bed- 
ford, Mass.; Sodality; History Academy. 



BANNON, WILLIAM J., Jr., 30 Lyman Street, Waltham, 
Mass.; Sodality; Sanctuary Society; Glee Club; Band; Boston 
Club. 



BARBER, VX'ILLIAM AUSTIN, 29 Franklin Road, West En- 
glewood, N. J.; Sodality; Scientific Society; History Academy; 
German Academy; New Jersey Club. 

BARRY. JOHN FRANCIS. 3 _ Park Avenue. Webster, Mass.; 
Sodality ; Basketball ; Intramural Sports ; Worcester Club. 

BARRY, JOHN THOMAS, 159 Dewey Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality; Worcester Club. 

BARTON, CLAYTON, 5 Hacker Court, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Worcester Club. 

BAUKAT, WILLIAM GEORGE, Beacon Falls. Conn.; Sodal- 
ity; Intramural Sports; Waterbury Club. 

BAXTER. WILLIAM J., Jr.. 43 Abbott Street, Worcester, 
Mass. Sodality; Worcester Club. 

BAYLEY, THOMAS JOSEPH, 409 Division Street, Fulton. 
N. Y. ; Sodality ; Choir ; Mission Crusade ; Intramural Debating. 

BENSON, JAMES A., 615 Middle Street, Fall River, Mass.; 
Sodality; Sanctuary Society; Mission Crusade; French Academy. 



BENGS, CARL M., 62 Pitkin Street, Manchester, Conn.; So- 
dality: Intramural Debating; Scientific Society; Sanctuary So- 
ciety; Mission Crusade; Hartford Club. 

BISKUP, WILLIAM ERVIN, 476 Livingston Avenue, Albany, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Scientific Society; Intra- 
mural Sports ; Sanctuary Society. 

BLACKMAN, JAMES WILLIAM. Jr., 200 Mystic Valley 
Parkway, Winchester, Mass.; Sodality; Golf; Boston Club. 

BOARDMAN. JOHN D.. 436 South Willard Street, Burling- 
ton, Vt.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Glee Club; Band; Mis- 
sion Crusade. 

BODANZA, SAMUEL J.. 8 Third Street, Fitchburg, Mass.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Sanctuary Society. 

BORZILLERI, PETER RICHARD. 72 Burtis Street, Oyster 
Bay, Long Island, N. Y. ; Intramural Sports; Metropolitan Club. 

BOURQUE, A. J., Jr., 75 Washington Street, Lynn, Mass.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Scientific Society; Yacht Club; 
History Academy ; Intramural Sports ; Sanctuary Society ; Labor 
Academy; Riding Club. 

BOWE, JOHN ALOYSIUS, 1012 Pleasant Street, Worcester, 
Mass.: Intramural Debating; Worcester Club. 

BRISSETTE, DAVID ARTHUR, 168 Florence Street, Melrose, 
Mass.; Intramural Sports; Mission Crusade. 

BROOKS, JOHN EDWARD. Jr.. 123 Woodard Street, West 
Roxbury, Mass. ; Sodality. 

BROWN. DONALD THOMSON. 1116 Grandview Street, 
Scranton, Penn.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Purple; Sanc- 
tuary Society; French Academy. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-six 




FRESHMAN B 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. M. J. McDonald, Jr., J. F. Merrigan, T. W. Phelan, R. L. Toomey, J. J. O'Connor, Rev. Father Carey, S.J., 
J. P. Trainor, V. deP. Ferry, D. A. Brissette, J. E. Hayes, N. J. Di Conza. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. J. B. Brunelle, E. J. Ranney, 
J. D. Boardman, R. W. Packard, J. W. Gookin, W. F. Moynahan, B. D. O'Neill, J. D. Carroll, Jr., J. R. Hankins. Third Row,, left to 
right: Messrs. J. A. Benson, N. F. Troiano, E. J. Ridge, J. V. McDonald, T. D. Dolan, T. H. Smith, J. F. O'Keefe, T. L. Rafferty, J. E. 

Lawlor, R. M. Lepire. 



BROWN, WALTER WHITNEY, 1 Delawanda Drive, Wor- 
cester, Mass.; Sodality; Worcester Club. 



CARBONE, FRANCIS ANTHONY, 4 Fifth Street, Fitchburg, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports. 



BRUNELLE, JOHN B., 22 Bank Street, Ware, Mass.; Sodal- 
ity; Intramural Debating; History Academy; Intramural Sports; 
Sanctuary Society; Mission Crusade. 

BRUNO, ARTHUR JOHN, Main Street, East Douglas, Mass. ; 
Sodality; N. R. O. T. C. 

BRYSON, JOHN J., 144 1 Ash Street, Manchester, N. H. 



BUCKLEY, JOSEPH W., Jr., 110 Lord Avenue, Bayonne, 
N. J. ; Golf; Intramural Sports; New Jersey Club. 



BURKE, JAMES E., New Scotland Road, Slingerlands, N. Y.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Tomahawk; Intramural Sports; 
Albany Club; N. R. O. T. C. 

BURKE, THOMAS G., 2015 East Lakewood Drive, Mil- 
waukee, Wis.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; N. R. O. T. C. 



BUTTERS, WILLIAM F., 19 Weld Avenue, Norwood, Mass. ; 
Boston Club; N. R. O. T. C. 



CAHILL, WILLIAM JOSEPH, 32 Wild Rose Avenue, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; French Academy. 

CALLAHAN, WILLIAM J., 1004 Woodycrest Avenue, Bronx, 
N. Y.; Intramural Sports; N. R. O. T. C. 

CAMPBELL, JOSEPH ANTHONY, 2039 South Redfield 
Street, Philadelphia, Penn.; Sodality; Football; Basketball; 
Philadelphia Club; N. R. O. T. C. 



CARDAMONE, LAWRENCE RICHARD, 722 Rutger Street, 

Utica, N. Y. ; Intramural Sports. 

CAREY, CHARLES P., 9640 South Winchester Avenue, Chi- 
cago, 111.; Sodality; Basketball; Golf; Intramural Sports; 
Chicago Club. 

CAREY, THOMAS ALBERT, 8 Bedford Street, Worcester, 
Mass. ; Sodality. 

CARRELLAS, ANTHONY THOMAS, Bliss Mine Road, New- 
port, R. I.; Newport Club; Intramural Sports. 

CARROLL, FRED F., 91 Derby Street, Valley Stream, L. I.; 
Sodality. 

CARROLL, JAMES HENRY, Jr., 497 Main Street, Lewiston, 
Me.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports, Band. 

CARROLL, JOHN DENNIS, Jr., 401 Hoosick Street, Troy, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Tomahawk; Albany Club; Intramural Sports. 

CASEY, EUGENE EDWARD, 8114 Merrill Avenue, Chicago, 
111.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports. 

C ASHMAN, GEORGE ANTHONY, 212 High Street, New- 
buryport, Mass. ; Sodality ; Intramural Debating ; Tomahawk ; 
Track; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; North Shore Club. 

CASHMAN, JOHN J., 1158-76 Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Band; 
Intramural Sports. 

CASSIDY, J. ALAN 3521 Rittenhouse Street, Washington, 
D. C; Sodality. 



Class of Nineteen Fnrty-six 




FRESHMAN C 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. R. C. Maxwell, V. A. Tatarczuk, J. L. Hanley, F. X. Miller, Rev. Father Ahearn, S.J., F. X. Sullivan, 

R. B. Toolin, J. J. Hayden, R. L. Reilly. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. C. F. Barton, J. J. Fogarty, J. E. Whalen, W. B. Thaney, 

W. J. Wolf, R. J. Horgan, J. T. Walsh, F. A. Fritz, W. H. Foley, S. J. Bodanza. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. J. W. Horan, J. E. 

McNamara, G. W. Guerinot, J. O. Duffy, G. B. Chaffm, F. C. Dooley, E. P. Kittredge, S. M. Mulkern. 



CASSIDY, WALTER LEON, 283 Atlantic Street, North 
Quincy, Mass.; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; French 
Academy; Boston Club. 

CATTEL, CHARLES J., 18 Railroad Street, Fitchburg, Mass.; 
Sodality; Basketball; Intramural Sports; Worcester Club. 

CHAFFIN, GEORGE B., 85 Brantwood Road, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality; N. R. O. T. C. 

CHIARI, JOHN GEORGE, 3 North Ninth Street, Paterson, 
N. J. 

CHURCHLEY, FREDERICK WILLIAM, Jr., 53 Bridge Street. 
Beverly, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural 
Sports ; Sanctuary Society. 

CLEARY, JAMES P., Jr., 18 Quinq' Street, Haverhill, Mass.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; Glee Club; 
Choir. 



CLOUGHERTY, THOMAS FRANCIS, 86 Forest Street, Clin- 
ton, Mass. ; Worcester Club. 



COBURN, JAMES FRANCIS, Jr., 8 Elm Street, Leominster, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; Sanc- 
tuary Society; French Academy; N. R. O. T. C. 



COVENEY, CHANNING RAYMOND, 18 Victory Avenue, 
Milton, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; 
N. R. O. T. C. 

COYLE, WILLIAM B., 69 Spring Street, Windsor Locks, Conn. 

CRUIKSHANK, JOHN WILLIAM, 149 Audubon Drive, Sny- 
der, N. Y.; Sodality; Intramural Sports. 

CUDDY, PAUL QUINN, 1208 Main Street, Athol, Mass.; So- 
dality; Scientific Society; History Academy; Intramural Sports; 
Sanctuary Society; N. R. O. T. C. 

CULLEN, JOHN CHARLES, 60 Pitcher Avenue, West Med- 
ford, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Purple Patcher; 
Intramural Sports ; Sanctuary Society. 

CUNHA, JOHN JOSEPH, North Grosvenordale, Conn.; So- 
dality; Intramural Debating; History Academy; Cross and 
Scroll ; Sanctuary Society ; Mission Crusade ; Hartford Club. 

CURRAN, ARTHUR CECIL, 392 Edgewood Avenue, West En- 

glewood, N. J.; Intramural Sports; New Jersey Club. 

CURRAN, JOHN J., 115 Heywood Street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

DASEY. CHARLES RICHARD, 344 Sale Avenue, Newton, 
Mass.; Greater Boston Club; N. R. O. T. C; Quarterdeck Club. 



COFFEY, MICHAEL LAWRENCE, 4039 Pleasant Avenue, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



DELANEY, JOSEPH DENIS, 45 Bulfinch Street, Lynn, Mass.; 
Sodality; Intramural Sports; Glee Club; N. R. O. T. C. 



CONLAN, PATRICK GRAHAM, 1321 Grafton Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Intramural Sports; Worcester Club. 



DELANEY, THOMAS FRANCIS, 9 Elizabeth Street, Pitts- 
field, Mass.; Band; N. R. O. T C. 



CONNOR, GEORGE STEPHEN, 7321 Indiana Avenue, Chi- 
cago, 111.; Football; Basketball; Chicago Club. 



DEL GIUDICE, FRANK, 1"?6 Lancaster Street, Leominster, 
Mass. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-six 




FRFSHMAN D 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. W. H. Miller, C. C. Grenier, J. J. O'Connell, J. T. Joyce, J. F. Barry, Rev. Father Gately, S.J., R. P. 
Galloway, C. J. Cattel, V. L. Iannoli, F. X. Kennedy, J. L. Gillis. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. K. B. Pasley, R. W. Dunn, E. F. 
Gully, F. X. McGrath, M. J. Murphy, J. J. Bryson, M. H. Egan, R. E. Furlong, J. H. Gillick, Jr., T. F. Delaney. Third Row, left to 
right: Messrs. G L. Hawkins, T. A. Carey, G. J. Remmert, T. M. Quinn, III, R. E. Forgues, F. C. O'Hare, F. O. Marshall, F. A. Carbone, 

R. F. Wynn, T. P. Kendrick, Jr., J. K. McGuire. 



DERMODY, JOHN J., 887 South Street, Needham, Mass.; 
Philharmonic; Boston Club; N. R. O. T. C. 

DEWING, JOHN CARROLL, 9 Goodrich Court, Milford, 
Mass. ; Sodality ; History Academy ; Sanctuary Society. 

DlCONZA, NICHOLAS JAMES, 2 Crown Street Extension, 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

DILLON, CHARLES HARVEY, 119 North Street, Batavia, 
N. Y. ; Sodality ; Intramural Sports ; Sanctuary Society ; Glee 
Club; Band; Mission Crusade; Western New York Club. 

DiPASQUALE, PHILIP JOSEPH, 292 Beresford Road, Roch- 
ester, N. Y.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Glee Club; Choir. 

DOHERTY, JOSEPH PAUL, Conant Avenue, Dudley, Mass. 

DOLAN, THOMAS D., 16 Rand Street, Lynn, Mass.; Sodality; 
N. R. O. T. C. ; Boston Club. 

DOLAN, WILLIAM ROBERT, Jr., 76 Margin Street Peabody, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; N. R. 
O. T. C. 



DONAHUE, JOHN JOSEPH, 14 1 Woodland Street, Law- 
rence, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Lawrence Club. 

DONAHUE, HENRY M., Whiteholme Road, Lee, Mass.; So- 
dality; Intramural Debating. 

DONOHOE, LOUIS NORMAN, 2914-44 Street, Washington, 
D. C. ; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; Phil- 
harmonic; Band; N. R. O. T. C. ; Crusaders. 



DONOVAN, FRANCIS X., 50 Daisy Street, Floral Park, L. I.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; History Academy; Cross and 
Scroll ; Sanctuary Society. 

DONOVAN, HAROLD E., 10 Maynard Street, Arlington, 
Mass.; Track; Greater Boston Club. 

DONOVAN, THOMAS FRANCIS, 247-95 Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Metropolitan Club. 

DOOLEY, FRANCIS CORNELIUS, 36 Worcester Street, Graf- 
ton, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating. 

DRAGO, CHRISTIE J., 408A Clinton Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Scientific Society. 

DRISCOLL, JOHN R., 28 Leland Road, Whitinsville, Mass. 

DRISCOLL, RICHARD MICHAEL, 47 North Main Street, 
Woodstown, N. J. ; Intramural Sports ; Sanctuary Society. 

DUFFY, O'NEILL J., 1225 Garden Street, Hoboken, N. J.; 
Intramural Sports ; Intramural Debating ; Sanctuary Society. 

DUHAIME, RICHARD EDWARD, 75 Stafford Street, Forest- 
ville, Conn.; Sodality; N. R. O. T. C. 

DUNN, ROBERT WINSON, 175 Myrtle Avenue., Rockland, 
Mass.; Track; Sanctuary Society; Band. 

DUNNE, EDWARD PATRICK, Jr., Farmington, Conn.; In- 
tramural Sports; Riding Club. 



DONOHUE, DAVID A., 34 Berkman Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Worcester Club. 



DUPREY, HARRY C, 303 Chestnut Street, Clinton, Mass.; 
Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; Worcester Club. 



Class of lineteen Forty-six 




FRESHMAN E 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. R. S. Long, Jr., W. J. Barman, Jr., D. Welch, R. S. McGovern, Rev. Father Ahearn, S.J., A. G. Santani- 

ello, A. J. Petrella, T. J. Bayley, C. P. Coveney. Second Row. left to right: Messrs. J. D. O'Brien, F. P. Murphy, R. W. Ferris, Jr., F. J. 

Sullivan, Jr., R. G. Hodson, M. E. Sweeney, W. F. Butters, R. B. Jackson. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. G. A. Cashman, T. D. 

Renaud, C. H. Dillon, U. J. Gionet, W. S. Kelleher, P. R. Borzilleri, C. D. Casey, J. J. O'Neil. 



DURKIN, LAWRENCE A., Brookfield, Mass.; Sodality; In- 
tramural Sports ; Sanctuary Society. 



FERRAZZI, ELIGIO JOHN, 34 Wood Avenue, Framingham, 
Mass.; Sodality; N. R. O. T. C. 



EGAN, MAURICE HUGH, 27 Crotion Avenue, Mt. Kisco, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Sanctuary Society; 
N. R. O. T. C. 



ELLIS, DONALD STEPHEN, 20 Shadyhill Road, Newton, 
Mass.; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; Boston Club. 

ENGEL, LEONARD JOSEPH, 711 Magie Street, Elizabeth, 
N. J.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; New Jersey Club; N. R. 
O. T. C. 



FERRUCCI, JAMES, Bridgeport, Conn.; Sodality; Intramural 
Sports; Manager of Football. 

FERRY, VINCENT JOSEPH DePAUL, 61 Parker Street, 
North Meriden, Conn.; Irish Cultural Academy; Sodality; In- 
tramural Sports; Philharmonic; Band; Hartford Club; N. R. 
O. T C. 



FINLEY, ROGER D., 340 Main Street, Oneida, N. Y.; So- 
dality; Intramural Debating; Sanctuary Society; Syracuse Club. 



ESPOSITO, JOHN WILLIAM, 432-6 Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. ; Intramural Sports ; Knights of Columbus ; Metropolitan 
Club. 



FAERBER, JOHN P., 39 Red Cross Avenue, Newport, R. I.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Tennis; French Academy; New- 
port Club. 



FAHEY, LAWRENCE RAYMOND, 3 Essex Road, Belmont, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; N. R. 
O. T. C. 



FAHEY, WILLIAM ANTHONY, Jr., 97 Longfellow Road, 
Worcester, Mass.; Sodality; History Academy; Glee Club. 



FEENEY, EUGENE MICHAEL, 27-15 167 Street, Flushing, 
N. Y.; N. R. O. T. C; Football; Metropolitan Club. 

FERRIS, ROBERT, Jr., Commonwealth Avenue, Hopkinton, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Track; Golf; Intramural 
Sports; Basketball; Mission Crusade; N. R. O. T. C. 



FINN, THOMAS D., 182-35 89 Avenue, Jamaica, N. Y.; So- 
dality; Intramural Sports. 

FITZGERALD, EDWARD FRANCIS, 10 Wahnita Road, 
Worcester, Mass.; Sodality; Worcester Club; N. R. O. T. C; 

Quarterdeck Club. 

FLAHERTY, LEO F., 1611 West 51 Street, Norfolk, Va.; 
Sodality ; Intramural Sports ; Sanctuary Society. 

FLAHIVE, JOHN J., 117 Ranney Street, Springfield, Mass.-, 

Sodality; Intramural Debating; Sanctuary Society. 

FLANDINA, JOHN A., 88-04 63rd Avenue, Forest Hills 
West, L. I., N. Y. ; Intramural Sports ; Metropolitan Club. 

FLEMMA, JOHN E., 718 Rutger Street, Utica, N. Y.; Intra- 
mural Sports. 

FLYNN, RICHARD JEROME, 122 B Avenue, West Albia, 
la.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-six 




FRESHMAN ECONOMICS A 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. J. K. Garrity, J. L. Forberg, R. W. Abbott, R. C. O'Brien, Rev. Fr. J. E. FitzGerald, S.J., J. W. Hurley, 
W. G. Murphy, P. L. Guilmette, J. R. Driscoll. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. R. K. Hogarty, L. R. Fahey, A. E. Nicholson, Jr., 
R. L. LaRue, W. C. Sullivan, Jr., R. W. Long, J. D. Delaney, P. F. Valledor, W. F. Scannell, C. H. Keen, Jr., J. R. Hanna. Third Row, 
left to right: Messrs. L. F. Flaherty, E. E. Casey, R. J. O'Keeffe, J. P. Doherty, J. L. Grzebien, J. J. Kearney, Jr., W. P. McKeough, 

E. B. Stanton, T. G. Burke, R. W. Sheehy, P. M. Sullivan. 



FOGARTY, JOHN JOSEPH, 3260 Ampere Avenue, Bronx, 
N. Y. ; Cross and Scroll; Lecture Debating; Intramural Sports. 



GIBBONS, JAMES JOSEPH, 6 Village Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; N. R. O. T. C; Sodality; Mission Crusade. 



FOLEY, WILLIAM HENRY, 97 Munfoy Street, Portland, Me. ; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary 
Society; Mission Crusade. 

FORBERG, JOHN LEROY, 18900 Appoline, Detroit, Mich.; 
N. R. O. T. C. ; Intramural Sports. 

FORD, ROBERT LEO, 89 Woodman Street, Lynn, Mass.; So- 
dality; N. R. O. T. C; Basketball; Greater Boston Club. 



GILLICK, JOHN H., Jr., 110 Francis Street, Providence, R. I.; 
Sodality; Track; Intramural Sports. 



GILLIS, JOSEPH LEO, 324 Bellevue Street, West Roxbury, 
Mass.; Sodality; Greater Boston Club. 



GIONET, URBAIN JOSEPH, Main Street, Oxford, Mass.; 
Sodality; Worcester Club. 



FORGES, ROLAND RAOUL GERARD, 92 Howe Street, Lew- 
iston, Me. ; Sodality ; Sanctuary Society. 



GOOKIN, JAMES WILLIAM, 14 Pentucket Avenue, Lowell, 
Mass.; Glee Club; Choir. 



FRITZ, FRANK, 254 Oakwood Avenue, Cedarhurst, N. Y.; 
Sodality; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society. 



GOTFREDSON, JOHN BENJAMIN, 2911 Iroquois, Detroit, 
Mich.; Sodality; N. R. O. T. C. ; Intramural Debating. 



FURLONG, ROBERT EDWARD, 215 Milton Avenue, Ball- 
ston Spa, N. Y. ; Sodality ; Intramural Debating ; Intramural 
Sports; Sanctuary Society; Glee Club; French Academy. 



GRAZIADEI, JOHN D., 622 Pelhadale Avenue, Pelham 
Manor, N. Y. ; Sodality; N. R. O. T. C. ; Sanctuary Society; 
Band. 



GALLOWAY, RICHARD PIERCE, Fond du Lac, Wis.; So- 
dality; Yacht Club; Tennis; Glee Club; Band; Wisconsin Club. 

GARRITY, JOHN KING, Fairfield, Conn.; N. R. O. T. C; 
Intramural Sports. 

GARVEY, JOHN JOSEPH, 130 Pine Street, Holyoke, Mass.; 
Intramural Sports; Intramural Debating; Sanctuary Society; 
Springfield Club. 



GRENIER, CARLTON CHARLES, 80 Lovell Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass.; Sodality; Track; Worcester Undergraduate Club. 



GRUDZINSKI, EDWARD FRANCIS, 15 Clay Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass. ; Intramural Sports ; Worcester Club. 



GRZEBIEN, JOHN L., 505 Lloyd Avenue, Providence, R. I.; 
Sodality; Track; Sanctuary Society; Le Cercle Frangais. 



GERAGHTY, MICHAEL FRANCIS, 127 Forest Street, Glov- 
ersville, N. Y. ; Sodality; History Academy; Intramural Sports; 
Sanctuary Society; Metropolitan Club. 



GUERINOT, GEORGE WASHINGTON, 758 West Main 
Street, Rochester, N. Y. ; Sodality ; Intramural Debating ; Sanc- 
tuary Society. 



Class of lineteen Forty-six 




FRESHMAN ECONOMICS B 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. W. J. Baxter, R. J. Flynn, E. J. Coyne, C. C. Widdis, E. M. Feeney, Rev. Father Francis J. Murphy, S.J., 
L. N. Donohoe, J. W. Norton, L. P. Guilmette, T. M. Stark, E. S. Hess. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. J. J. Cahill, W. J. Wall, Jr., 
P. J. DiPasquale, L. J. Wenning, L. S. Engel, R. J. Kervick, W. E. McGrath, J. B. Gotfredson, V. J. Raskopf, J. F. Berg, G. E. Young, 
C. R. Dasey, F. T. Koenig. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. C. P. Schoeffel, J. L. Raleigh, R. F. Knight, W. G. Baukat, F. J. Hamilton, 
J. P. Cleary, J. L. Naruszewicz, T. J. Spellicy, R. L. Ford, J. L. Shea, W. F. Maguire. 



GUILMETTE, LOUIS PAUL, 558 Main Street, Lewiston, Me.; 
Sodality; Intramural Sports. 

GUILMETTE, PAUL LOUIS, 558 Main Street, Lewiston, Me.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating. 

GULLY, EDWARD F., 68 Malvern Road, Worcester, Mass.; 
Cross and Scroll ; Intramural Sports ; Knights of Columbus ; 
Worcester Undergraduate Club. 

HAGGERTY, JAMES N., 141 Englewood Avenue, Brookline, 
Mass.; Sodality; History Academy; Sanctuary Society; Band. 

HAGGERTY, WALTER ELLIOTT, 300 Fairfield Avenue, 
Stamford, Conn.; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; 
French Academy. 



HAMEL, ROBERT R., 147 Samoset Avenue, Quincy, Mass.; 
Sodality; N. R. O. T. C. ; Intramural Sports; Greater Boston 
Club. 



HAMILTON, FREDERICK JOSEPH, 35 Dixon Street, Bridge- 
port, Conn.; Sodality; N. R. O. T. C. ; Intramural Sports; 
Bridgeport Club. 



HANKINS, JAMES ROBERT, 9 Nahant Avenue, Revere, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; History Academy. 



HANLEY, JAMES, 6811 Groton Street, Forest Hills, L. I., 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Sports. 



HANLON, JOSEPH DANIEL, Jr., 19 Eureka Terrace, Wor- 
cester, Mass. 



HANNA, JACKSON R., R. F. D. #1, Wayland, N. Y. 



HARRINGTON, EDWARD J., 556 County Street, New Bed- 
ford, Mass.; N. R. O. T. C. Drum and Bugle; Intramural 

Sports; Sanctuary Society. 

HARTNETT, WILLIAM, 440 Mill Hill Avenue, Bridgeport, 
Conn.; Band; Hartford Club. 

HAWKINS, GERARD L., Jr., 9 Norwood Street, Norwood, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports. 

HAYDEN, JOHN J., 10A Emerson Street, Portland, Me.; 
Sodality. 

HAYES, JOHN EDWARD, 119 North Willard Street, Bur- 
lington, Vt. ; Intramural Sports. 

HAYES, JOHN JOSEPH, 45 Havelock Road, Worcester, 
Mass.; N. R. O. T. C. ; Intramural Sports. 

HEFFERNAN, JAMES EDWARD, Jr., 6 Black Friar Road, 
Rosemont, Pa.; Sodality; Band; Philharmonic; Sanctuary So- 
ciety; Crusaders; N. R. O. T. C; N. R. O. T. C. Drum and 
Bugle Corps. 

HENDERSON, CHARLES F., 460 Scotland Road, South Or- 
ange, N. J.; N. R. O. T. C; Sodality. 

HESS, EDWIN H., 8522-104 Street, Richmond Hill, L. I., 
N. Y.; Tomahawk; Metropolitan Club. 

HOGAN, JOHN F., Jr., 15 Maynard Street, Pawtucket, R. I.; 
Sodality, Intramural Debating; Football Manager; Intramural 
Sports; Sanctuary Society; Rhode Island Club. 

HOGARTY, ROBERT KERAN, 117-01 Park Lane South, 
Kew Gardens, N. Y. ; Sodality; Tomahawk; Glee Club; Intra- 
mural Sports ; N. R. O. T. C. ; Metropolitan Club Treasurer. 



Class of Nineteen Fnrty-six 




FRESHMAN ECONOMICS C 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. H. C. Duprey, J. P. O'Brien, T. F. Donovan, T. D. Finn, H. M. Donahoe, R. E. Duhaime, P. F. Mona- 
han, R. J. O'Brien, J. W. Blackham, Jr., J. M. Walsh, J. E. Burke. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. E. T. O'Brien, T. J. Ryan, R. E. 
Quinn, C. J. McClinch, R. J. Marron, J. V. McAuliffe, Jr., A. J. Bardetti, W. F. Kelly, E. A. Lofy, W. J. Schambach, J. W. McEnroe, 
W. B. Coyle. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. P. R. Oggiani, J. G. Potts, J. E. Heffernan, G. W. Russell, J. P. Faerber, A. F. Hurley, Jr., 

H. E. Donovan, Jr., R. F. Mallozzi, R. F. Molinari, J. T. McLoughlin. 



HODSON, ROBERT GEORGE, 7 Fairway Lane, Manhasset, 
N. Y. ; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; N. R. O. T. 
C. ; Metropolitan Club. 

HORAN, JAMES WALTER, 160 High Street, Webster, Mass. 

HORGAN, RICHARD J., Jr., 301-60 Street, West New York. 
N. J.; Football; Intramural Debating; Irish Cultural Academy; 
Sanctuary Society; German Academy; Metropolitan Club; N. R. 
O. T. C; Quarterdeck Club. 

HURLEY, ALBERT F., Jr., 350 West Street, Brockton, Mass.; 
Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; Boston Club. 

HURLEY, JAMES WILLIAM, 33 Union Street, Shelton, 
Conn.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Labor Academy. 

IANNOLI, VINCENT LEONARD, 24 Africa Street, Provi- 
dence, R. I.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Cheer Leading. 

JACKSON, RICHARD B., Westchester Apartments, Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; Sodality; Band; Choir; Intramural Debating; In- 
tramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; Glee Club; French 
Academy. 

JAMESON, RICHARD F., 420 Maple Street, Marlboro, Mass.; 
Sodality; Greater Boston Club. 

JONES, FRED WILLIAM, 4 Tatnuck Terrace, Worcester, 
Mass. ; Sodality. 

JOYCE, JAMES THOMAS, 22 Marion Street, Fitchburg, 
Mass. ; Worcester Club. 



KAIRIS, EDWARD ROBERT, 2811 North Main Avenue, 
Scranton, Pa. ; Football. 



KEARNEY, JOHN J., Jr., 1949 East 21 Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Tomahawk; Intramural Sports; Metropolitan 
Club. 

KEEN, CHARLES H., 63 Adam Street, East Hartford, Conn.; 
N. R. O. T. C. 

KELLEHER, W. STANISLAUS, 194 Ridge Street, Glen Falls, 
N. Y. ; Albany Club; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; 
Sanctuary Society. 

KELLEY, JOSEPH WILLIAM, 120 Oak Street, Hudson Falls, 
N. Y.; Sodality; N. R. O. T. C. 

KELLEY, RICHARD S., 95 Highland Avenue, Somerville, 
Mass.; Sodality; N. R. O. T. C; N. R. O. T. C. Drum and 
Bugle Corps. 

KELLY, JAMES VINCENT, 140 East 28 Street, New York, 
N. Y. ; Intramural Sports; Metropolitan Club. 

KELLY, MICHAEL J., Center Street, Lee, Mass.; Intramural 
Sports. 

KELLY, THOMAS S., 96 Commodore Road, Worcester, Mass. ; 
Sodality; Worcester Club; German Academy. 

KELLY, WILLIAM FRANCIS, 28 Luke Street, Waterbury, 
Conn. ; Waterbury Club. 

KENDRICK, THOMAS PAUL, Jr., 454 Washington Street, 
Brookline, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural 
Sports. 

KENNEDY, FRANCIS XAVIER JOHN, 8 Seaview Avenue, 
St. Andrew, Jamaica, British West Indies ; Sodality ; Intramural 
Debating; Dramatic Society; Scientific Society; Track; Tennis. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-six 




FRESHMAN SCIENCE A 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. R. J. Stapleton, R. L. Turek, J. C. Ferrucci, L. R. Cardamone, Rev. Mr. Read, S.J., T. F. Moriarty, J. A. 

Kopfinger, T. F. Clougherty, L. R. Simeoni. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. J. J. Donahue, J. A. Morton, O. P. LeBlanc, C. M. Bengs, 

J. H. Carroll, J. J. Cashman, J. R. Lyons, E. M. Powers, T. S. Kelly, third Row, left to right: Messrs. J. W. Esposito, G. P. McGuire, 

W. E. Haggerty, T. S. Rodowicz, C. H. Scribner, B. W. O'Mara, R. W. O'Connell, J. A. Flandina, C. J. Drago. 



KENNEY, THOMAS J., Jr., 6531 Church Road, Merchant- 
ville, N. J.; Football; Sanctuary Society; N. R. O. T. C; Phil- 
adelphia Club. 

KERRIGAN, WILLIAM ANTHONY, 103 Brockton Avenue, 
Haverhill, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Intramural De- 
bating; French Academy; N. R. O. T. C; North Shore Club. 

KING, JOHN EDWARD, 8 Vesper Street, Worcester, Mass. 

KITTREDGE, EDWIN P., 16 Prescott Street, Clinton, Mass.; 
N. R. O. T. C; Worcester Undergraduate Club. 

KOLASINSKI, HENRY V., East Leverett, Mass. ; Football. 



LOFY, EDWARD, 1324 North 55 Street, Milwaukee, Wis.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; Wisconsin 
Club. 



LONG, RALPH WALDO, Jr., 255 West 88 Street, New York, 
N. Y. ; Track ; Intramural Debating ; Sanctuary Society. 

LONG, ROBERT STEPHEN, 90 Brinkerhoff Street, Platts- 
burg, N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Glee Club. 

LORD, JOHN STUART, 282 Commonwealth Avenue, Chest- 
nut Hill, Mass.; Sodality; Scientific Society; Intramural Sports; 
N R. O. T. C. 



KOPFINGER, J. ARNOLD, 44 South Vine Street, Mt. Car- 
mel, Pa. ; Intramural Sports. 

LARKIN, LEO A., 44 Quality Street, Forest Hills, N. Y.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; Metropolitan 
CLib. 

LARUE, ROGER LUCIEN, 256 Park Avenue, Arlington, 
Mass. ; Intramural Debating ; Sanctuary Society ; French Acad- 
emy. 

LAWLOR, JOHN EDWARD, 13 Helen Street, Johnson City, 
N. Y.; Sodality; Sanctuary Society; N. R. O. T. C. 

LeBLANC, OZIAS, Maple Avenue, North Oxford, Mass. 

LeMAR, HAROLD KENNEDY, 580 Myrtle Street, Albany, 
N. Y. ; Scientific Society; Tennis; Intramural Sports; Philhar- 
monic; Albany Club; Crusaders; N. R. O. T. C. 

LEPIRE, RAYMOND MARTIN, 252 Main Street, Cherry 
Valley, Mass.; Sodality; French Academy; Worcester County 
and Worcester Clubs. 



LYNCH, THOMAS ROBERT, 556 Plymouth Street, Abington, 
Mass.; Football. 



LYONS, JOHN R., 981-77 Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Intramural 
Debating; History Academy; Track; Intramural Sports; Glee 
Club; Mission Crusade. 



MacDONALD, WILLIAM MICHAEL, 1356 Quincy Shore 
Boulevard, South Braintree, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; 
Yacht Club Secretary; Boston Club Treasurer; N. R. O. T. C. 

MAGUIRE, WILLIAM FRANCIS, 22 Kingsbury Street, Wor- 
cester, Mass.; Sodality; Track; Tennis; History Academy; Glee 
Club; Knights of Columbus; Worcester Undergraduate Club. 

MALLON, HARRY A., 33 East End Avenue, New York, 
N. Y.; Sodality; Track; Intramural Debating; N. R. O. T. C; 
N. R. O. T. C. Drum and Bugle Corps. 

MALLOZZI, RALPH FRANK, 40 Peach Street, South Barre, 
Mass.; Sodality; Band. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-six 




FRESHMAN SCIENCE B 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. J. R. McNulty, A. T. Carrellas, J. A. Bowe, W. L. Cassidy, Rev. Mr. McNeil, S.J, R. J. Molloy, F. J. 
McNulty, D. M. Tormey, E. F. Ziegler. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. D. T. Brown, P. L. Mathieu, Jr., J. F. Hogan, Jr., R. J. 
McMahon, Jr., W. E. Reilly, A. C. Curran, L. H. Larkin, D. S. Ellis. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. W. R. Hartnett, R. Perez, J. F. 
Shevlin, J. J. Garvey, F. R. Schwartz, G. H. McCormack, E. F. Grudzinski, J. E. Flemma. 



MALONEY, PAUL JOSEPH, Worcester, Mass.; Sodality; In- 
tramural Sports; Worcester Club; N. R. O. T. C. 



McCLINCH, CHARLES J., Jr., 275 Euclid Avenue, Bridge- 
port, Conn.; Sodality; Band. 



MANAHAN, DAVID VINCENT, 358-2 Street, Dunellen, 
N. J.; Sodality; Golf; Intramural Sports; New Jersey Club. 

MARRON, ROBERT JOSEPH, 260 Gardner Road, Ridgewood, 
N. J. ; Sodality ; Intramural Debating ; Intramural Sports ; New 
Jersey Club; N. R. O. T. C. 

MARSHALL, FRANK ORRIN, 473 Upper Boulevard, Ridge- 
wood, N. J.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports. 

MATHEWS, WILLIAM J., 141 Franklin Avenue, Cranston, 
R. I.; Football. 



MATHIEU, PETER L, 12 Van Ausdall Street, Providence, 
R. I.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Sanctuary Society. 



McCORMACK, GEORGE H, 10 Centre Avenue, Larchmont, 
N. Y. ; Intramural Debating; New York Club. 

McDONALD, JOSEPH VALENTINE, 61-04 78 Street, Elm- 
hurst, L. I.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Purple Patcher; 

Tomahawk. 

McDONALD, MICHAEL JOSEPH, 28 Water Street, Lewis- 
ton, Me. ; Sodality ; Sanctuary Society. 

McENROE, JAMES W, 206 West State Street, Wellsville, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Sports. 

McENTEE, WILLIAM, 250 Crown Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; 
Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; 
Metropolitan Club; N. R. O. T. C. 



MATTLE, JOHN A, 303 Browncroft Boulevard, Rochester, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Band; Intramural Sports; N. R. O. T. C; 
N. R. O. T. C. Drum and Bugle Corps; Sanctuary Society. 

MAXWELL, RAYMOND CLAVER, 5 Kilton Street, Taunton, 
Mass.; Sodality; Sanctuary Society; Intramural Sports; Intra- 
mural Debating. 



McAFEE, JOSEPH, 951 Locust Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Football. 



McAULIFFE, JOHN V, Jr., 332 Billings Road, Wollaston, 
Mass.; Sodality; Tennis; Intramural Debating; Intramural 
Sports; Yacht Club; N. R. O. T. C. 



McGOVERN, RICHARD SHERIDAN, 380 Morris Avenue, 
Providence, R. I.; Sodality; Intramural Sports. 

McGRATH, FRANCIS X, 16 Church Street, Windsor Locks, 
Conn. 

McGRATH, WILLIAM EDWARD, 49 Converse Street, 
Palmer, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society. 

McGUIRE, GEORGE P, 240 West 259 Street, New York, 
N. Y. ; Metropolitan Club. 

McGUIRE, JOHN KENNEY, 12 Schussler Road, Worcester, 
Mass. ; Sodality. 



MCCARTHY, DAVID JOSEPH, 222 Woburn Street, Medford, 
Mass. ; Football. 



McINTOSH, CHARLES RAYMOND, 73 Reservoir Street, 
Lawrence, Mass.; Sodality; Sanctuary Society. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-six 




FRESHMAN SCIENCE C 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. P. F. Sullivan, F. W. Jones, P. J. Maloney, H. S. Baldo, J. N. Haggerty, W. R. Dolan, E. J. Walcek, F. J. 
Shakespeare, A. J. Bruno. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. J. D. Hanlon, N. F. Sperry, Jr., W. J. Callahan, J. J. Gibbons, P. Q. Cuddy, 
Rev. Father Evanson, S.J., B. E. Shlesinger, W. M. Zarrella, L. A. Durkin, G. E. Smith, Jr., F. P. Del Giudice. Third Row, left to right: 
Messrs. R. F. Kelly, E. P. Dunne, W. E. Biskup, F. W. Churchley, J. W. Buckley, W. W. Brown, J. S. Lord, W. A. Barber, W. M. Pol- 
glase, H. K. LeMar, W. J. H. McEntee, Jr., J. E. Nolan, J. A. Pelletier. Fourth Row, left to right: Messrs. F. F. Carroll, J. A. Mattle, 
R. F. Jameson, E. F. Fitzgerald, E. J. Woodward, A. J. Bourque, Jr., R. E. Mousseau, P. E. Prior, F. P. Rodgers, E. J. Tabor, R. Thomas, 

C. R. Mcintosh. 



McKEOUGH, WILLIAM PATRICK, 114 South Pine Avenue, 
Albany, N. Y. ; Sodality; Baseball; Track, Basketball; Tennis; 
Golf; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; Knights of Colum- 
bus; Mission Crusade; Labor Academy. 

McLOUGHLIN, JOHN T., 334 Park Place, Brooklyn, N. Y.; 
Sodality; History Academy; Football. 

McMAHON, RALPH J., 419 East Main Street, Endicott, 
N. Y.; Tomahawk; Intramural Sports. 

McNAMARA, FRANCIS XAVIER, Jr., 3 Windsor Street, 
Haverhill, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary So- 
ciety; Haverhill Club; N. R. O. T. C; Quarterdeck Club. 

McNAMARA, JOSEPH EDWARD, 378 South Main Street, 
Haverhill, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports. 

McNULTY, FRANCIS J., Mattituck, L. I. ; Intramural Sports. 

McNULTY, JOHN R., 20 Leray Street, Potsdam, N. Y.; 
Sodality. 

MERRIGAN, JOHN FRANCIS, 68 Danforth Avenue, Jersey 
City, N. J.; Baseball; Tennis; Intramural Sports; Metropolitan 
Club; N. R. O. T. C. 

MILLARD, DANIEL F. M., 148 Prospect Street, Ridgewood, 
N. J.; Intramural Debating; New Jersey Club. 

MILLER, FRANCIS XAVIER, 84 Rockland Road, Auburn, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; Wor- 
cester Club. 



MILLER, WALTER HAMILTON, 7717 Colonial Road, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y.; Intramural Sports; N. R. O. T. C. 



MOISAN, LEO ROLAND, 20 Mill Street, Oakland, R. I.; 
Football. 

MOLINARI, ROBERT FRANCIS, 216 Plantation Street, Wor- 
cester, Mass. 

MOLLOY, ROBERT JOSEPH, 31 Middlefield Drive, West 
Hartford, Conn.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Hartford 
Club; Intramural Sports. 

MOONEY, PAUL WARD, 4 Frieilane Terrace, Boston, Mass.; 
Sodality; Boston Club. 

MORAN, PAUL NICHOLAS, 1011 Pleasant Street, Worcester, 
Mass. 

MORASKY, THEODORE M., 1714 Cranberry Street, Erie, 
Pa.; Football; N. R. O. T. C. 

MORIARTY, THOMAS F., South Windham, Conn.; Sodality; 
Intramural Debating; Scientific Society; Sanctuary Society; 
Choir; French Academy. 

MOUSSEAU, ROBERT EMILE, 23 Cross Street, Manville, 
R. I.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; N. R. O. T. C. 

MOYNAGH, JOHN R., Jr., 69 Piedmont Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality; Knights of Columbus; Worcester Undergrad- 
uate Club; Army Reserve. 

MOYNIHAN, WILLIAM FRANCIS, 19 Douglas Street, Wor- 
cester, Mass.; Intramural Sports; Mission Crusade; Worcester 
Undergraduate Club; N. R. O. T. C. 

MULDOON, JAMES, 190 Pleasant Street, Winthrop, Mass.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Tomahawk; Boston Club; 
N. R. O. T. C. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-six 




FRESHMAN EDUCATION 

First Row, left to Right: Messrs. L. J. Picucci, T. S. Strojny, C. J. O'Brien, Rev. Father James E. FitzGerald, S.J., L. S. O'Connor, R. M. 

Driscoll, R. J. Richards. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. W. J. Wade, L. R. Moisan, T. P. Smith, J. G. Chiari, R. E. Smith, E. R. 

Kairis. Third Row, left to right: Messrs. H. V. Kolasinski, R. X. Tivnan, F. F. Wolanski, W. J. Mathews, J. T. Barry. 



MULKERN, STEPHEN MARTIN JOSEPH, 38 Kellogg Street, 
Portland, Me. 

MURPHY, FRANCIS PATRICK, 93 Clark Street, Clinton, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Worcester Club. 



MURPHY, MARTIN JAMES, Jr., 105 Prescott Street, Clin- 
ton, Mass.; Sodality; Worcester Undergraduate Club; N. R. 
O. T. C. 



MURPHY, ROBERT PAUL, 20 Kenwood Avenue, Worcester, 

Mass. 



MURPHY, WALTER GERARD, 16 Abbott Road, Dedham, 
Mass.; Intramural Debating; N. R. O. T. C. 

MURRAY, JOHN GREGORY, 7 Park Road, Maplewood, 
N. J. ; Sodality ; History Academy ; Intramural Sports ; Sanc- 
tuary Society. 

NARUSZEWICZ, JOSEPH LOUIS, 215 Fairlawn Avenue, Wa- 
terbury, Conn.; Intramural Debating; Waterbury Club. 



NOON AN, RICHARD PATRICK, 209 Nelson Avenue, Sara- 
toga Springs, N. Y. ; Sodality; History Academy; Sanctuary 
Society; Glee Club; Choir; French Academy; Treasurer of 
Albany Club. 



NORTON, JOHN W., 30 North Street, Granville, N. Y.; 
Intramural Sports; Albany Club; N. R. O. T. C. 



O'BOYLE, JAMES EDWARD, 3105 West Wisconsin Avenue, 
Milwaukee, Wis.; Sodality; Glee Club; Wisconsin Club; Intra- 
mural Debating. 



O'BRIEN, CHARLES JOSEPH, 96 Beacon Avenue, Holyoke, 
Mass.; Intramural Sports; Mission Crusade; French Academy; 
Holyoke Club. 

O'BRIEN, JOSEPH D., 45 Exchange Street, Rockland, Mass.; 
Sodality ; Football ; Track ; Intramural Sports ; Philharmonic ; 
Band; N. R. O. T. C. 



O'BRIEN, JOSEPH P., 1128 West Main Street, Waterbury, 
Conn. ; Sodality ; Intramural Debating ; Sanctuary Society. 



NETTER, CHARLES H., 21 Beechmont Avenue, Bronxville, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Sanctuary Society. 



O'BRIEN, ROBERT C, Chatsworth Gds., Larchmont, N. Y.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Football Manager. 



NICHOLSON, ARTHUR EUGENE, Jr., 22 Richwood Street, 
West Roxbury, Mass.; Intramural Debating; Assistant Football 
Manager; N. R. O. T. C. 



O'BRIEN, ROBERT JOSEPH, 929 Shirley Street, Winthrop, 
Mass.; Sodality; Yacht Club; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary 
Society; Boston Club; N. R. O. T. C. 



NOLAN, JOSEPH E., 18 Victor Avenue, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality; Worcester Club. 



OCONNELL, JOSEPH JOHN, Jr., 101 Bentwood Road, West 
Hartford, Conn. ; Sodality. 



NOONAN, EDWARD MATHEWS, New York, N. Y.; In- 
tramural Debating; Football; Intramural Sports; French Acad- 
emy; N. R. O. T. C. 



OCONNELL, ROBERT JOHN JOSEPH, 36-01 20 Road, As- 
toria, N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; 
Sanctuary Society; Metropolitan Club; N. R. O. T. C. 



Class nf Nineteen Forty-six 



O'CONNELL, ROBERT WILLIAM, 14 Cambridge Street, 
Rockville Center, N. Y. ; Intramural Debating; Intramural 
Sports; Sanctuary Society; Metropolitan Club. 

O'CONNOR, JOHN JOSEPH, Jr., 2126 New York Avenue, 
Union City, N. J. ; Sodality ; Intramural Sports ; Sanctuary So- 
ciety; New Jersey Club. 

O'CONNOR, JOSEPH EDWARD, 19 Clement Street, Wor- 
cester, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Philharmonic; 
Band; Worcester Club. 

O'CONNOR, LAWRENCE S., 22 Lincoln Street, Spencer, 
Mass.; Sodality; Irish Cultural Academy; Intramural Sports; 
Knights of Columbus; Mission Crusade; Worcester Club. 

OGGIANI, PETER R., Mountain Street, Great Barrington, 
Mass.; Sodality; Berkshire County Club. 

O'HARE, FRANCIS G., 356 Newton Street, Brookline, Mass.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Golf; Intramural Sports; Sanc- 
tuary Society; Band. 

O'KEEFE, JOHN FRANCIS, 87 McCarthy Avenue, Cherry 
Valley, Mass.; Sodality; Worcester Undergraduate Club. 

O'KEEFFE, ROBERT JOSEPH, 39 Moultrie Street, Dorches- 
ter, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Intramural Debating. 

O'NEIL, JAMES JOHN, 175 High Street, Greenfield, Mass.; 
Sodality ; Intramural Debating ; Intramural Sports ; Holyoke 
Club. 



O'NEILL, BERNARD D., 162 Summer Street, Fitchburg, 
Mass.; Sodality; Worcester Club. 



OSTROSKI, EUGENE STANLEY, 368 Farmington Avenue, 
New Britain, Conn.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary 
Society; Mission Crusade. 



PACKER, RICHARD W., 1240 East 28 Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Sports. 



PASLEY, KEVIN BURNS, 456 Richmond Avenue, Maple- 
wood, N. J.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; 
Sanctuary Society. 



PELLETIER, JOSEPH ARMAND, 7 Arcadia Street, Fisher- 
ville, Mass. ; Worcester Undergraduate Club. 

PEREZ, RICARDO R., 1 Elliot Place, Santune, Puerto Rico; 
Intramural Sports. 

PETRELLA, ALBERT J., 16 Spruce Street, Buffalo, N. Y. ; So- 
dality ; Intramural Debating ; Football ; Intramural Sports ; Sanc- 
tuary Society; Western New York Club; N. R. O. T. C; Ger- 
man Academy. 



PHELAN, THOMAS WILLIAM, Jr., 371 Broadway. Rens- 
selaer, N. Y. ; Sodality; Tomahawk; Cross and Scroll; Track; 
Sanctuary Society; Glee Club; Choir; Albany Club; N. R. 
O. T. C. 



PICONE, ANGELO J., 52 North Main Street, Thompsonville, 
Conn. Sodality; Mission Crusade. 

PINGETON, EDWARD B., 5 South Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Intramural Sports; Worcester Undergraduate Club. 



POLGLASE, WILLIAM MALONE, Jr., 7302 Ridge Boule- 
vard, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Scientific Society; Yacht Club; Intra- 
mural Sports; N. R. O. T. C. 

POTTS, JOSEPH G., 75 Waterbury Avenue, Stamford, Conn. ; 
Sodality; Intramural Sports; N. R. O. T. C. 

POWERS, EDWARD M., 87 Park Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Worcester County Club. 

PRIOR, PHILIP EDWARD, 176 Kensington Road, Kensing- 
ton, Conn.; N. R. O. T. C. 

QUINN, RICHARD E., Jr., 34 Northbridge Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass. ; Worcester Club. 

QUINN, THOMAS MICHAEL, 3233 2l4th Street, Bayside, 
L. I., N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports. 

RAFFERTY, THOMAS L., 173 North Common, Lynn, Mass.; 
Sodality; Glee Club; Choir. 

RALEIGH, JAMES L., 35 Elm Street, Rutland, Vt.; Intramural 
Sports; N. R. O. T. C. 

RANNEY, EDWARD JAMES, 705 Third Avenue, Troy, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Track; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; 
Albany Club. 

RASKOPF, VINCENT J, 34 Hilton Avenue, Garden City, 
L. I.; N. R. O. T. C. 

READ, MICHAEL ALOYSIUS, 24 West Street, Milford, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating. 

REILLY, RICHARD LOUIS, 23 Turtle Place, East Haven, 
Conn.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; 
N. R. O. T. C. 

REILLY, WILLIAM E., 666 High Street, Union City, Conn.; 
Sodality; Intramural Sports; Waterbury Club. 

REMMERT, GEORGE JOSEPH, 16 Ambrose Terrace, East 
Hartford, Conn.; Sodality; N. R. O. T. C. 

RENAUD, THEODORE DONALD, 72 Pacific Street, Fitch- 
burg, Mass. ; Sodality. 

RICHARDS, ROBERT JOSEPH, 113V2 Palm Street, Nashua, 
N. H.; Football. 

RIDGE, EDWARD JOSEPH, 99 Walnut Street, Portland, Me. ; 
Intramural Debating; History Academy. 

RODDY, CHARLES R., 23 Garnet Street, Fitchburg, Mass.; 
Sodality; Scientific Society; Yacht Club; Camera Club; Tennis; 
Golf; Intramural Sports; Glee Club; Band. 

RODGERS, FRANK, 111 Hobart Street, Utica, N. Y.; Intra- 
mural Debating; Mission Crusade. 

RODOWICZ, THADDEUS S., 64 Perry Avenue, Worcester, 
Mass. ; Worcester Club. 

RUGGIERO, FRANK A., 356 Jackson Street, Orange, N. J.; 
Sodality; Football; Intramural Sports; New Jersey Club. 

RUSSELL, GEORGE W., 22 Clinton Street, Waterbury, Conn.; 
Sodality; Yacht Club; Intramural Sports; Glee Club; Water- 
bury Club; N. R. O. T. C. 



Class nf nineteen Forty-six 




FRESHMAN SOCIAL SCIENCE AND HISTORY 

First Row, left to right: Messrs. J. V. Kelly, J. C. Spillane, J. J. Hayes, J. J. Kerrigan, Jr., E. B. Pingeton, Rev. Mr. Read, S.J., M. F. 
Geraghty, J. R. Moynagh, R. P. Noonan, L. M. Tighe, A. J. Picone. Second Row, left to right: Messrs. R. L. Bassett, P. G. Conlan, C. P. 
Carey, W. J. Cahill, E. J. Ferrazzi, T. R. Smith, T. R. Lynch, F. X. McNamara, Jr., E. S. Ostroski, J. T. Schomer, D. J. McCarthy. Third 
Ron; left to right: Messrs. R. L. Ware, T. M. Whelan, J. W. Kelley, J. J. Curran, J. B. Muldoon, D. V. Manahan, J. E. King, P. N. 

Moran, P. W. Mooney, T. M. Morasky. 



RYAN, THOMAS JOSEPH, 214 Washington Street, Glouces- 
ter, Mass. ; Sodality. 

SANTANIELLO, ANGELO GARY, 93 Ocean Avenue, New 
London, Conn.; Sodality; Intramural Sports. 



SCANNELL, WILLIAM FRANCIS, 58 Ames Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass. 



SCHAMBACH, WILLIAM JAMES, 20 Elm Court, Orange, 
N. J.; Intramural Sports; New Jersey Club. 

SCHOEFFEL, CHARLES P., 516 Riverside Avenue, Trenton, 
N. J.; Sanctuary Society; N. R. O. T. C; Riding Club. 



SCHOMER, JOHN THOMAS, 31 Glendale Street, Everett, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; History Academy; 
Greater Boston Club. 



SCHWARTZ, FRANCIS ROBERT, 6l6 Iron Street, Lehigh- 
ton, Pa.; Sodality; Sanctuary Society; Pennsylvania Club. 



SHEEHY, RICHARD W., Jr., 21 Washington Street, Win- 
chester, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; 
Boston Club. 

SHEVLIN, JOHN FRANCIS, 26 Carman Road, Scarsdale, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Scientific Society; Intramural Sports; Sanctu- 
ary Society; Metropolitan Club. 

SHLESINGER, B. EDWARD, 36 Hurstbourne Road, Roches- 
ter, N. Y. ; Intramural Sports; Glee Club; Choir. 

SIMEONI, LOUIS R., 10 Cedar Street, Leominster, Mass. 

SMITH, GEORGE EDWARD, 45 Plantation Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass. ; Sodality. 

SMITH, ROBERT EDWARD, Nashua, N. H.; Football. 

SMITH, THOMAS HENRY, 16 Irving Avenue, Pascoag, R. I.; 
Sodality; Intramural Debating; Track; Sanctuary Society; N. 
R. O. T. C. 

SMITH, THOMAS PATRICK, 2961 Gaul Street, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Football, Basketball. 



SCRIBNER, CHARLES H., 259 Union Street, Bangor, Me.; 
Intramural Sports. 



SHAKESPEARE, FRANK J., 14 Hillside Avenue, Port Wash- 
ington, L. I., N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intra- 
mural Sports; Sanctuary Society. 



SHEA, J. LEO, 22 Alley Street, Lynn, Mass.; Sodality; Intra- 
mural Sports; Greater Boston Club. 



SHEA, JOHN FRANCIS, 507l/ 2 Springfield Street, Chicopee, 
Mass.; Sodality; Basketball; Tennis. 



SMITH, THOMAS RICHARD, 72 Rose Hill Avenue, New 
Rochelle, N. Y. ; Football, N. R. O. T. C. 

SPELLICY, THEODORE JOSEPH, 1100 West Dominick 
Street, Rome, N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary 
Society; N. R. O. T. C. 

SPERRY, NORMAN FRANCIS, 627 75th Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Intramural Sports; Metropolitan Club; N. R. O. T. C. 

SPILLANE, JOHN C, 10 Leamington Road, Brighton, Bos- 
ton, Mass.; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Soicety; Mission Cru- 
sade; Boston Club. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-six 



STANTON, EDMUND B.. 303 Lafayette Street, Salem, Mass.; 
Sodality; Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; Band; Greater 
Boston Club. 

STAPLETON, RICHARD JOHN, 141 Main Street, Agawam, 
Mass.; Springfield Club; Riding Club. 

STARK, THOMAS M., 805 Roanoke Avenue, Riverhead, 
N. Y. ; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Philharmonic; Band; 
N. R. O. T. C. 



STROJNY, THEODORE. 2 State Street, Taunton, Mass.; 
Football. 



SULLIVAN, FRANCIS JOHN, 342 West Princess Anne Road, 
Norfolk, Va. ; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Tomahawk ; His- 
tory Academy; Cross and Scroll; Sanctuary Society; Glee Club; 
Mission Crusade; Labor Academy. 

SULLIVAN, FRANCIS XAVIER, 44 Maywood Street, Wor- 
cester, Mass. ; Worcester Club. 



VALLEDOR. PEDRO R.. Box 283, Puerto Rico. 



WADE, WILLIAM JAMES, 166 Bartlett Street, Lewiston, Me.; 

Football. 



WAGNER, LAWRENCE HENRY, 121 Lemon Street, Buffalo, 
N. Y.; Sodality; N. R. O. T. C. 

WALCEK. E. J., 218 Myrtle Street, Shelton, Conn.; Sodality; 
Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society. 

WALL. WALTER JAMES, Jr., 24 Sylvan Street, Worcester, 
Mass.; Sodality; Worcester Club; N. R. O. T. C. 

WALSH, JAMES THOMAS, 462 Maple Street, Holyoke, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; Holyoke Club. 

WALSH. JOSEPH M., Eustis Avenue, Newport. R. I.; Sodal- 
ity; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; Newport Club; 
N. R. O. T. C. 



SULLIVAN, PAUL M„ Wykagyl Gardens, New Rochelle, 
N. Y. ; Sodality ; Cross and Scroll ; Intramural Sports ; Sanctuary 
Society; N. R. O. T. C. 



WARE, ROBERT LEE, 66 Second Street, Garden City, N. Y.; 
Sodality; Yacht Club; Intramural Sports; Metropolitan Club; 
N. R. O. T. C. 



SULLIVAN, PHILIP FRANCIS, 118 Endicott Street, Worces- 
ter, Mass. ; Sodality. 



WELCH, DAVID, 15 Thames Street, Springfield, Mass.; So- 
dality; Sanctuary Society. 



SULLIVAN, WALTER CHARLES, 20 California Avenue, 
Springfield, Mass. 



WENNING, LOUIS J., 393 Bath Avenue, Long Branch, N. J.; 
Intramural Sports; Sanctuary Society; N. R. O. T. C. 



TABOR, EDWARD JOSEPH, 359 Ash Street, Willimantic, 
Conn.; Intramural Sports. 



WHALEN, JAMES EDWARD, 309 Nunda Boulevard, Roches- 
ter, N. Y.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports. 



TATARCZUK, VINCENT ATHOY, 11 School Street, Port- 
land, Me.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Sanctuary Society. 

THANEY, WILLIAM BURKE, 288 Melrose Street, Rochester, 
N. Y.; Intramural Sports. 

THOMAS, ROBERT, Seffner, Fla.; Sodality; Sanctuary Soci- 
ety; Band; N. R. O. T. C. 

TIGHE, LAWRENCE W., Boston Post Road, South Sudbury, 
Mass.; Intramural Sports; Worcester Undergraduate Club; 
N. R. O. T. C. 

TIVNAN, ROBERT V., 2 Louise Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality; Irish Cultural Academy; Varsity Debating; Intra- 
mural Sports ; Knights of Columbus ; Mission Crusade. 

TOOLIN, ROBERT BENSON, 33 Pleasant Street, Leominster, 
Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Debating; Worcester County Club; 
N. R. O. T. C. 

TOOMEY, ROBERT LOUIS, 4 Aspen Street, Chevy Chase, 
Md. ; Choir. 

TORMEY, DAVID M., 310 Selye Terrace, Rochester, N. Y.; 
Intramural Debating; Glee Club. 

TRAINOR, JAMES PHILIP, 91 June Street, Worcester, Mass.; 
Sodality; Worcester Club. 

TROIANO, NICHOLAS FRANCIS, 130 Lake Street, Arling- 
ton, Mass.; Intramural Sports. 



WHALEN, JAMES THOMAS, 146 1 University Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. ; Track; Intramural Sports; Metropolitan Club; 
N. R. O. T. C. 

WHELAN, THOMAS MALCOLM, 8 Manomet Street, Wor- 
cester, Mass.; Sodality; Intramural Sports; N. R. O. T. C; 
Worcester Undergraduate Club. 

WIDDIS, CHARLES COULTER, Long Branch, N. J.; Intra- 
mural Sports; New Jersey Club. 

WOLANSKI, FREDERICK FRANK, 122 Phillips Avenue, 
Bedford, Mass.; Intramural Debating; Intramural Sports; 
Knights of Columbus; Mission Crusade; French Academy; 
Bristol County Club. 

WOLF, WALLACE JOHN, Jr., 66 Monica Street, Roches- 
ter, N. Y.; N. R. O. T. C. 

WOODWARD, EDWARD JAMES, 29 River Street, North- 
boro, Mass.; Intramural Sports; N. R. O. T. C. 

WYNN, ROBERT FRANCIS, 8 Arch Street, Norwalk, Conn.; 
Intramural Sports ; Sanctuary Society. 

YOUNG, GEORGE EDWARD, 150 68th Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y.; Sodality; Tomahawk; Intramural Sports; Metropolitan 
Club; N. R. O. T. C. 

ZARRELLA, WILLIAM M., 4 Granite Street, Fitchburg, Mass.; 

Worcester Undergradute Club. 



TUREK, RAYMOND, 111 Cleveland Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; 
Sodality; Choir; Mission Crusade. 



ZIEGLER, EDMUND FRANCIS, 53 Hillcrest Avenue, New 
Britain, Conn.; Sodality. 



Class of Nineteen Forty-six 



ACTIVITIES 



Since the distant daicning days 
of 1846. when the B. f. F. was 
formed and dramatics flourished 
under the Smithsonian Ethiopian 
Minstrel Society, life on Paka- 
choag has been rich in tradition. 
In 1897 the first PURPLE was 
published. Shakespeare lived on 
Fenivick's ttage and the glory of 
Grecian drama ivas recaptured. 
So her sons sing of "These happy 
days which tee have lately lived 
and soon must quit, no more to 
see them save through half-shed 
tears." 





Tomahawk 



Editor-in-Chief 
WILLIAM N. LARSON 

Associate Editor 
Francis J. Kelley 

Business Manager 
Paul D. McCusker 

Circulation Manager 
Thomas J. Hickey 

Managing Editor 
Andrew S. Carten 

City Editor 
Robert P. McKeogh 

Editorial Editor 
John R. McCarthy 

News Editor 
William P. Whelan 

Feature Editor 
Martin F. Conroy 



Sports Editor 
James P. Lynch 

Assistant Sports Editor 
John P. Swords 

Feature Sports Editor 
Benjamin J. Singleton 

Moderator 
Rev. James E. FitzGerald, S.J. 




4£jjy 



William N. Larson Paul D. McCusker 

Editor-in-Chief Business Manager 




The Purple Patcher 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief 
STEPHEN S. BARONE 



Associate Editor-in-Chief 
Literary Editor 
Activities Editor 
Feature Editor 
Research Editor 
Ex -Men Editor . 
Moderator 



William N. Larson 

John R. McCarthy 

Joseph H. McCann 

Joseph T. Daly 

Francis J. Kelley 

. Joseph E. Foley 

Rev. Joseph D. FitzGerald, S.J. 




Literary Board 

Martin F. Conroy, Jr., William P. Whelan, Jr., J. 
William Quinn, Joseph P. Murphy, Louis L. Battey, 
James W. Byrne, William C. Sweeney. 



Senior Write-ups 

Roland P. Schambach, Clarence E. Emery, Wallace 
F. Haley, John E. Lawlor, John E. Bezemes, James L. 
Garrity, Richard T. Martell, Robert E. May, Charles 
J. McNulty, Edward F. Danowitz, William C. O'Neil, 
Vincent J. McSweeney, Adrian C. McNamara, Paul 
E. Soulliere, Francis P. Sharry, Charles J. Gillon. 



Edit 01 



Sports Staff 

Benjamin J. Singleton 



Assistant Editors 
John P. Swords James P. Lynch 



Stephen S. Barone 
Editor-in-Chief 



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The Purple Patcher 



UNDERCLASSMEN BOARD 



Editor 



Juniors 



Assistants 



Joseph Garland, Jr. 



William Cullen F. Hamilton Lane 

Raymond Cooney 



Sophomores 
Editor ..... Walter Egan 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
JOHN E. RYAN 

Circulation Manager 
Thomas E. Meath 

Photography Manager 
William H. McBain 

Staff Photographers 
Charles W. Chagnon 
Raymond P. Ghelardi 

Advertising Staff 
Francis X. Burnes 

James V. Devine 
Richard J. Dubord 



Assistants 
John Bradley John Brennan 



Editor 



Robert O'Connell 
James O'Boyle 



Freshmen 



Assistants 



John Cullen 



Joseph McDonald 
John Graziadei 




John E. Ryan 

Business Manager 




Resident Sodality 



Prefect 

john r. McCarthy 



Vice-Prefect 



Thomas P. Casey 



First Assistant Prefects 
James A. Blakely John E. O'Hara 

Second Assistant Prefects 
John P. Swords Henry F. Kilfoil. '44 

Secretaries 

John B. Noone, '45 John P. Driscoll, '45 

Robert J. O'Connell, '46 

Director . Rev. T. Lawrence Foran, S.J. 

Assistant Director . Mr. James H. Monagle, S.J. 




John R. McCarthy 
Prefect 



The Sodality of our Lady, boasting a mem- 
bership which is proportionately the largest in 
many years, carried on an extensive program of 
activities during a year which was dedicated 
to a crusade of prayer for a Christian victory 
for our country and a Christian peace for the 
world. The prefects and secretaries succeeded 
in integrating under the banner of Mary a large 
number of projects sponsored by Sodality 
committees. 

Dialogue Masses were celebrated frequently, 
with the Dialogue Mass Committee leading the 
prayers. The Missal Committee and Sanctuary 
Committee also served liturgical functions. The 
Pamphlet Rack Committee kept us reading 
pamphlets. The Campus Contact, Catholic Lit- 
erature, and Catholic Truth Committees col- 
lected and disseminated magazines. The Poster 
and Publicity Committees kept the college in- 
formed of Sodality activities, along with the 
Bulletin-board Committee. The Membership 
Committee compiled necessary records. 

May talks were delivered during that month 
by Sodalists. Radio symposiums were presented 
on Mary Immaculate, Pope Pius XII and Peace, 
and the Catholic Culture of South America. 
Other projects were Mission Book Week, Cath- 
olic Book Week, the Help the Poor Crusade, 
and the crusade against the birth control 
referendum. 

The annual Solemn reception of candidates 
was held on December 13th and 130 new So- 
dalists were inducted. 




Mission Crusade 



Conscientiously, week by week, a corps of 
resident students knock at the doors of resi- 
dents on their respective corridors asking for 
contributions, while a band of day students re- 
ceive coins from non-resident students. These 
collectors are the loyal representatives of the 
Mission Crusade. Upon these men is built an 
organization that is vital for the support of mis- 
sionaries in Iraq and Jamaica. The degree of 
success reached by the Mission Crusade this 
year is due in great part to these men of gen- 
uine Christian zeal. 

The purpose of the Mission Crusade is to 
send absolutely necessary materials to the Jesuit 
Fathers in Iraq and Jamaica. It is difficult to 
measure the gratitude that the self-sacrificing 
missionaries express in their letters of acknowl- 
edgment and gratitude to the students. 

During war-time, the money is not sent di- 
rectly to the Mission fathers ; instead it is de- 
posited in a bank and credit, to pay for essen- 
tials in Jesuit mission life, is extended. 

Edward Gilmore kept the students aware of 
the work of the Crusade by handling the bulle- 
tin board. On the board is found grateful let- 
ters from missionaries, and general news of 
the excellent work which is done, in peace-time 
and war-time alike, by the Jesuit missionaries. 

Stephen Barone, who headed the organiza- 
tion during the Spring Term, handed over the 
reins to Paul Gleason in September. 



President 
PAUL D. GLEASON 



Associate President 
First Vice-President 
Second Vice-President 



Stephen S. Barone 

Cornelius V. McGillicuddy 

. James W. Egan, '44 



Day-Student Representatives 
James L. Garrity John J. O'Toole, Jr. 

Publicity Manager . . Edward Gilmore 

Director . . Rev. Harold V. Stockman, S.J. 




Paul D. Gleason 
President 




Day Student Sodality 



Prefect 
LEO J. BRESNAHAN 

Assistant Prefect .... John Tyler, '44 
Recorder ..... John Boursy, '45 
Moderator . . Rev. Raymond F. X. Cahill, S.J. 




Leo J. Bresnahan 
Prefect 



The Day Students' branch of the Sodality of 
the Blessed Virgin Mary concentrated its efforts 
this year toward an impression upon its mem- 
bers of the necessity for Catholic Action. It 
was a year of interesting meetings, excellent or- 
ators, and appropriate addresses, which con- 
spired to bring every Sodalist to the vital real- 
ization of what he is going to be called upon to 
face in this harrassed and war-torn world of 
today. 

Fundamental Catholic principles and truths 
were stressed in successive lectures to the So- 
dality by the Fathers James L. Brennan, S.J., 
Francis J. Murphy, S.J., Thomas E. Shortell, 
S.J., and Patrick J. Higgins, S.J., and Professors 
William H. McCann and Alfred V. Boursy. 

In addition to their weekly meetings, the So- 
dalists attended Mass in a body on the First 
Friday of every month in St. Joseph's Memorial 
Chapel. 

A notable manifestation of the Catholic Ac- 
tion of the organization was its sponsorship, 
with the cooperation of the Worcester Under- 
graduate Club, of a lecture on Birth Control by 
Rev. Harold V. Stockman, S.J. The scene of 
this presentation was Alhambra Hall. This 
lecture was especially appropriate in view of the 
fact that it took place just previous to the day 
of voting on a referendum on Birth Control in 
the State of Massachusetts. 




Sanctuary Society 



The Sanctuary Society at Holy Cross cele- 
brates, along with the college, its hundredth 
anniversary. During the past century this soci- 
ety has enrolled more Holy Cross students in 
its register than any other society. This is as it 
should be, for the society's one aim is to serve 
our Blessed Lord at the altar and to engender 
in the hearts of its members more love for the 
Mass. 

At no time in the society's history has the 
world outside seemed so dark, but that fact has 
caused the members to value the Mass all the 
more, for all of us realize that in the near fu- 
ture we shall be scattered around the world and 
only the Mass can keep us united in Christ. 

It has been the privilege of Paul Gleason, 
President, and James Stanard, Master of Cere- 
monies, under the direction of the Moderator, 
Rev. Harold C. Kirley, S.J., to guide the society 
through its centennial year. The tireless hours 
that the Director, President, and Master of 
Ceremonies have given to the society has met 
with the generous response from over two hun- 
dred members. With their cooperation it has 
been possible to supply all the priests on the 
Hill with servers for their daily Masses. The 
members also offered their services for the fre- 
quent Benediction ceremonies. 



President 
PAUL D. GLEASON 



Master of Ceremonies 



James J. Stanard 



Senior Assistants 
Benjamin J. Singleton John P. Swords 

Junior Assistants 
Martin C. McCue, '44 Joseph R. Kelly, '44 



Moderator 



Rev. Harold C. Kirley, S.J. 



: ■ 





James J. Stanard 
Master of Ceremonies 




The Purple 



Editor-in-Chief 

john r. McCarthy 



Managing Editor 



Business Manager 



Moderator 



Martin F. Conroy 



Eugene T. Lawless 



Rev. Joseph D. Ahearn, S.J. 




John R. McCarthy 
Editor-in-Chief 



Eugene T. Lawless 
Business Manager 



The Class of 1943 took The Purple on its 
shoulders this year and successfully carried it 
through our accelerated schedule. John Mc- 
Carthy, big boss, turned his talents to women 
writers, salesmen of Shakespeare and the bour- 
geoisie. His "Too Many Girls" had the campus 
guffawing for weeks ; he made The Purple read 
like the New Yorker without profanity. Mar- 
tin Conroy, sub-chief, tried his hand at articles, 
fiction and verse. He told us about "The Boy 
Who Could Wriggle His Ears" and "Shakes- 
peare's Theatre." Bill Quinn completely un- 
covered the talent he had been hiding and 
made us wish we had discovered it sooner. We 
won't soon forget his simple tale of the kindly 
nun who hated to see "her" boys and girls go 
out into the world. 

Fran Kelley took time off from track to lend 
a serious tone to The Purple, discoursing wisely 
and well on Claudel and the corporate state, 
among others. Ben Singleton, in his theatre 
column, didn't like quite a few plays, and told 
us so in very certain terms. Ed Danowitz sang 
of the fields of friendly strife and of men who 
go down to the sea in ships, and sang well 
enough to clean up in poetry awards. And 
Andy Carten, with clear black lines, high- 
lighted aspects of the campus we had never no- 
ticed before. Gene Lawless hustled ads. 

A few undergrads like Paul Cronin, Ken Sul- 
livan, Phil Cahill, Dick Lambert, Don Brown 
and Joe Dudenhoefer showed by their talent 
that The Purple is good for several more years 
of publication. 




History Academy 

To make recorded events live as they actually 
and verily happened is the aim and hope of 
historians. The modern militant rhythm of life 
was emphasized in the present year's series of 
lectures and discussions conducted by the His- 
tory Society. Each Monday the two divisions 
of the History Society, the Boarders' Chapter, 
and Worcester Chapter, held illustrated lectures 
en "The Far East." The Solomon Islands, the 
Dutch East Indies, the Philippines, Malaya, 
Japan, India and Russia were studied succes- 
sively. In addition the History Societies par- 
ticipated in round-table discussions on "The 
Problems of a Lasting Peace" at Emmanuel Col- 
lege and Providence College. 

The above remarks must be construed as de- 
scribing a war effort, but also a peace effort. 
To help win the war by affording a series of 
geographical, ethnological, strategical, and his- 
torical lectures dealing with the Far Eastern 
theater of war in which Americans now fight 
and die, was one chief aim. To help win the 
peace was another. 

The interest shown, the large attendance at 
meetings, indicated that the members were not 
bogged down in pessimism over the war, that 
they are not of the number of those who feel 
that it is ill to be born in these times, but, as 
true historians, they know that mankind in the 
past has made a new world out of an old one, 
and can do it again. 



RESIDENT STUDENT 
OFFICERS 




President 

EUGENE T. LAWLESS 

Vice-President . . Joseph Garland, Jr., '44 

Secretary . . . Alfred E. Mulkern, '45 

DAY STUDENT OFFICERS 

President 
WILLIAM C. O NEIL 

Vice-President . . . James D. Evans, '44 

Secretary . . . Edward J. Kroyak, '45 

Moderator . . Rev. Patrick J. Higgins, SJ. 




Eugene T. Lawless William C. O'Neil 

Resident Student President Day Student President 






President 




LEONARD I. CHANG 


Vice-President 


Edward Gilmore 


Secretary 


John J. OToole, Jr. 


Treasurer 


James P. Lynch, Jr. 


Moderator 


Rev. Joseph D. FitzGerald, S.J. 




Leonard I. Chang 
President 



Alpha Sigma Nil 

This honor society is to the Jesuit college 
what the Phi Beta Kappa is to non-catholic in- 
stitutions. The cream of societies here on the 
hill, it recognizes in a man the wonderful three- 
fold balance of Scholarship, Loyalty and Serv- 
ice. It has as its ideals and aims the propa- 
gation of the essentials of a Jesuit college and 
education. Through its alumni groups, and 
through the activity of its undergraduate chap- 
ters, it seeks the perpetuation in all Catholic 
men of the fundamental concepts which should, 
and do, mark the Catholic-trained college man. 
By holding up its standards to the young col- 
lege boys, it seeks to give them incentive to at- 
tain while in college the molding characteris- 
tics of Scholarship, Loyalty and Service. 

Each year the members of the society, to- 
gether with the Dean of the college, choose 
seven members from the junior class who, in 
their estimation, possess this three-fold requi- 
site; and who, in addition, seem able to inspire 
these qualities in others. 

Besides the officers, Stephen S. Barone, Wil- 
liam N. Larson, Jr., and John R. McCarthy 
made up the roster of this year's society. 

Alpha Sigma Nu was founded at Marquette 
University in 1915, by the Rev. John A. Dan- 
ihy, S.J. Since then its growth has been wide- 
spread throughout the realm of Jesuit institu- 
tions, until now it includes members among her 
alumni who are disseminated through all parts 
of the globe. The Holy Cross chapter was 
founded in 1940, the year which marked the 
Silver Anniversary of the society. 




Purple Key 



The Purple Key is a selective student organ- 
ization whose purpose is to foster devotion to 
Holy Cross by sponsoring student activities and 
furthering the interest of the student body in 
college affairs. 

The first time members of the Key were seen 
in any official capacity this year was on Fresh- 
man registration day, when they acted in their 
customary role of campus guides and red caps. 

Under the leadership of Chairman Dick 
Johnson, the rally program was set in motion 
with music, laughter and spirit injected into 
the student body before the Dartmouth, Du- 
quesne, North Carolina State and Colgate foot- 
ball games. At the Colgate rally, a new fight 
song, "Hail, Holy Cross" was introduced, and 
has since met with much favor. 

Other major activities of the Key during the 
year were the Key dance, directed by Gene 
Lawless, which was held after the Colgate 
game; the supervision of a collection for the 
stipend Masses for service men ; ushering in 
the student section at football games; and the 
presentation of a floral horseshoe to Coach 
Scanlan before the opening game. 

The senior members of the Key are Chair- 
man Dick Johnson, Tom Meath, Jim Fair- 
clough, Joe Mendes, Jack Ryan, Dick Dubord, 
Rocky Schambach, Vin McSweeney, Dave Jen- 
nings, Walt Winchester and Gene Lawless. In 
making this one of the best years in the history 
of the Key, due credit should be given to Father 
Evanson, whose timely suggestions and loyal 
interest were of great assistance. 



Chairman 
RICHARD G. JOHNSON 



Moderator 



Rev. John P. Evanson, S.J. 




Richard G. Johnson 

Chairman 




Glee Club 



Manager 
KENNETH E. SULLIVAN, '44 



Assistant Manager 
Baritone Soloist 
Piano Soloist 
Violin Soloist 
Moderator 
Assistant Moderator 
Director 



Jerry Cassidy, '45 

E. Everett Hewitt, '44 

William Fahey, '46 

Henry Ozimek, '44 

Rev. Joseph M. Keane, S.J. 

Rev. Paul E. Murphy, S.J. 

Prof. J. Edward Bouvier, M.A. 




Kenneth E. Sullivan 
Executive Manager 



Every student on the Hill has become ac- 
quainted, in some way or other, with the Mu- 
sical Clubs. All the students have heard the 
band as it marches with precision during the 
football season ; all have heard the Glee Club 
in its annual student concert ; all have heard the 
Philharmonic, Holy Cross' instrument of "high- 
brow" music; but few students realize the 
work, the time, the effort which goes into one 
of the satin-smooth performances of any of the 
clubs. 

The band it is, which leads the students in 
their rejoicing, when the "home-team" goes 
over that last white line down on Fitton Field ; 
the band it is, which keeps the rooters rooting 
when the opposition is knocking loudly on the 
Purple goal-posts; and it is the band which, 
with stirring music and precision marching, 
keeps the paid customers from falling asleep 
between the halves. A lot of work goes into 
these performances ; throughout the football 
season the members of the band must practice 
new numbers every week, must learn intricate 
steps, steps which will be translated into at- 
tractive panoramas at game-time. 

The Glee Club is the organization which has 




Philharmonic Orchestra 



set all of New England whistling "Stout- 
Hearted Men" during the concert season. Be- 
fore clubs, before schools, before whole com- 
munities the Glee Club has performed, spread- 
ing as perhaps no other organization can, the 
cultural name of Holy Cross. Resplendent in 
"white tie and tails," the singers have in their 
repertoire songs ranging in variety from the 
Marines' Hymn to Gounod's "Ave Maria." 
It goes without saying that long hours of prep- 
aration must precede each one of these con- 
certs. Each member of the Club must be in- 
dividually trained, and then the Club as a unit 
must be taught the secrets of collective harmony 
and individual melody. The Glee Club, even 
more than the other organizations, must be at 
its peak for its public concerts, for it carries 
with it on all its trips the name of Holy Cross. 

This year the Glee Club opened its season 
with a concert for the soldiers at Fort Devens, 
contributing of their time and talents towards 
keeping up the morale of the boys in khaki. 

The Philharmonic Orchestra has been called 
the handmaiden of the Glee Club, but perhaps 
such a title doesn't do this fine organization 
justice. The Philharmonic does furnish the 



background for the stirring melodies of the 
Glee Club; but to say that the Philharmonic is 
not an organization capable of drawing crowds 
in its own right is not quite true. All the Sen- 
iors remember the chef-d'oeuvre of the Phil- 
harmonic, Brown's "American Bolero," played 
back in their freshman year, and more recently, 
such works as "Rhapsody in Blue" and Han- 
del's "Hallelujah Chorus" from the "Messiah." 

Much of the success which the Clubs have 
enjoyed this year and in past years, has been due 
to the untiring efforts of the Rev. Joseph M. 
Keane ; it has been Father Keane who has man- 
aged, in days of gas rationing, to get the mem- 
bers from place to place smoothly, and to ar- 
range those details which, when properly ar- 
ranged, add so much to the pleasure of par- 
ticipants and audience alike. 

To Prof. J. Edward Bouvier, too, the clubs 
give a vote of thanks. For it has been he who 
has made pleasant meetings out of tiresome re- 
hearsals, who has encouraged, and at the same 
time, criticized. A master of the art of dealing 
with men, Prof. Bouvier has been influential in 
making the clubs extremely popular with the 
members themselves. 




B. J. F. Debating Society 







President 












MARTIN F. 


CONROY 






I T ic e 


-President 






Francis 


J. Kelley 


Secretary 






Ed 


ward Gilmore 


Treasurer 






Paul 


D. 


McCusker 


Mar 


shal . 






James 


W. Byrne 


Moa 


Aerator 


. Rev. 


Davi 


id W. 


Tw 


omey, S.J. 



Intercollegiate Debate Moderator 
Nicholas J. McNeil, S.J. 




Martin F. Conroy. Jr. 

President 



In May the B. J. F., under the gavel of Mar- 
tin Conroy, swung into its 98th year of exist- 
ence. In January, it was still going strong. A 
full schedule of house, intercollegiate, lecture 
and radio debates kept the forty-odd members 
of the society on the go. 

The house debates were held every week, 
with Juniors for the most part as participants. 
Before long several Juniors had distinguished 
themselves sufficiently to warrant promotion to 
the varsity. 

The intercollegiate program was affected 
only slightly by the war, though more debates 
were held at the College than in former years. 
Boston College, Fordham, M. I. T., Salem 
State Teachers, Clark, Boston University, Wor- 
cester Polytech, Worcester State Teachers were 
some of the colleges that appeared either in 
Kimball Auditorium or in Leonard Hall. The 
B. J. F. also sent four men to the Dartmouth 
Intercollegiate Debate Tournament. 

The "Holy Cross Forum of the Air" featured 
two series, one on the book "Why Should I Be 
Moral?" and the other on International Law. 
John O'Toole was radio debate manager, as- 
sisted by Stephen Barone and Joseph Lovering. 

Worcester high schools, organizations of vo- 
ters, and women's colleges were the scene of 
several interesting lecture debates. 

Among the Seniors who distinguished them- 
selves were Eugene Lawless, John McCarthy, 
John Ryan, Paul Gleason, David Murphy, Jos- 
eph P. Murphy, John Hourigan, Stephen Ba- 
rone, Martin Conroy, and John O'Toole. 




Dramatic Society 



Perhaps of all the activities at Holy Cross, 
Dramatics was hit most by the war. Despite 
an ambitious program which had been planned 
by the president and moderator, the society was 
suspended for the duration. 

It had been the purpose of the society to 
foster an interest in the theater. This it did by 
its presentation of student and guest lectures, 
of original one-act plays and of the annual 
Freshman play and, especially, by its produc- 
tion of the annual College Play. 

The lectures were sponsored by the Playshop, 
and were presented for the purpose of review- 
ing the history of the theater and of inspiring 
embryonic Catholic playwrights with lofty 
themes. The other function of the Playshop 
was the annual one-act play competition. 

The annual College Production had always 
been the climax of the year's program. During 
our three years of activity in the society, we 
travelled to Austria in Rostand's "L'Aiglon," 
to England in Shakespeare's "Richard II," and 
back home to America in Lavery's "First Le- 
gion." 

The society also offered opportunity for those 
who so wished to gain experience in the tech- 
nical side of the theater. There were the tech- 
nicians, the electricians, the stage designers and 
the directors. 

Among the more prominent Seniors in the 
organization must be included the names of 
Eugene Lawless, Martin Conroy, John R. Mc- 
Carthy, James Devine, Robert Fullan, William 
McBain and Stephen Barone. 



President 
STEPHEN S. BARONE 



Secretary 

Playshop Director 
Moderator 



William M. Cousins, '45 
Kenneth E. Sullivan, '44 
Gerald A. Kinsella, SJ. 




Stephen S. Barone 
President 




Crass and Scroll 



President 
JAMES J. STANARD 



Vice-President 



Secretary 



William P. Whelan 



Louis S. Bernadotte, '44 



Sergeant-at-Arms . Francis A. M. Hickey, '45 



Moderator 



Rev. William T. Donaldson, SJ. 




James J. Stanard 
President 



The program of the Cross and Scroll Club 
this year was highlighted by the presentation 
of lectures by three noted speakers. Two of 
these told the members about current affairs 
and future trends, and the third about Flemish 
art of yore. 

These subjects conformed with the ultimate 
end of the society which is to instruct the mem- 
bers in affairs with which every Catholic who 
wishes to call himself truly cultured should be 
acquainted. 

The first lecture was presented by the Baron- 
ess Flora von Westen of the Netherlands; the 
Baroness spoke about the historical background 
of her native Holland, and of the conditions 
prevalent in the country at the time of invasion. 

Just before the Christmas holidays, Dr. Wil- 
helm Solzbacher, a refugee from the Gestapo 
and a former Catholic youth leader in Ger- 
many, lectured on "Christianity and Totali- 
tarianism." Dr. Solzbacher has published sev- 
eral books on current politico-religious topics. 

Soon after the students' return from the hol- 
idays, the Baron Joseph Van Der Elst, a mem- 
ber of the Belgian embassy and a noted art 
connoisseur and patron, added to the strictly 
cultural knowledge of the Club by his illus- 
trated lecture on "Flemish Art in the XVth 
Century." 

Thus this year the club included in its scope 
discussions of the finer things in life and dis- 
cussions of those less fine, with authoritative in- 
structions on how to foster the former and how 
to eject the latter from our lives. 




Scientific Society 

In this, its thirty-fifth year of activity, the 
Scientific Society went a long way towards ac- 
complishing its end, namely the presentation 
of scientific facts in an interesting and compre- 
hensible manner. For many years now the Sci- 
entific Society has limited itself to a discussion 
of various topics in Physics. This year, how- 
ever, the Society broadened its scope to include 
biological and chemical analyses, and thereby 
added new interests for those engaged in scien- 
tific work. The members were able to see 
their class lectures translated into practical 
application. 

Raymond Ghelardi, president of the organ- 
ization, treated the topic: "Photography: Prin- 
ciple and Practice" at the first regular meeting. 
Ghelardi traced the entire process in brief. Fol- 
lowing a discussion of lenses and lens aberra- 
tions, the speaker gave a brief exposition of 
films and their characteristics, supplemented by 
specially prepared lantern slides. 

In his lecture on the "Stroboscope," Robert 
Masterson brought to light the practical appli- 
cations concerned, while James Lucid' s subject, 
"Wirephotos," provided a clear explanation of 
the method of sending pictures by means of 
radio. Other lectures, including "Blood Pres- 
sures and Blood Count" were also delivered 
during the course of the year. Much credit and 
thanks is due Father Connolly for his generous 
and whole-hearted cooperation. 



President 
RAYMOND P. GHELARDI 



Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Moderator 



Robert Masterson, '44 

James Lucid, '44 

Joseph G. Murphy 

Rev. James K. Connolly, S.J. 




Raymond P. Ghelardi 

President 




President 
EDWARD GILMORE 

Secretary . . . William P. McKone 

Moderator . Rev. Florance M. Gillis, SJ. 







Edward Gilmore 
President 



Aquinas Circle 

Upholding a tradition of many years' stand- 
ing, a large group of Seniors with a bent for 
philosophical discussion formed the 1942-43 
edition of the Aquinas Circle, for the purpose 
of applying fundamental principals of scholas- 
tic philosophy to present-day world problems. 
Under the patronage of the Angelic Doctor and 
with the guidance of Father Florance M. Gillis, 
S.J., the initial meeting was held on October 27, 
1942, when Eugene T. Lawless delivered an 
interesting lecture on Evolution as the root of 
all the modern "isms." Showing the genesis 
of Evolution from the union in thought of 
Agnosticism and Science, Mr. Lawless traced 
the influence of philosophical evolution on the 
concept of the State as held in Russia and Ger- 
many, and en the concept of the nature of man 
held by the Behaviorists and the Freudians. 

The second meeting of the Circle was fea- 
tured by Thomas H. Neagle's enlightening dis- 
cussion of economic problems after the war and 
their solution. His chief point was that gov- 
ernmental control of industry was necessary. 

James M. Quinn was the next lecturer, and 
his topic was "The Essence of Bolshevism and 
its Futuristic Tendencies." Various other phi- 
losophies and their possible future develop- 
ment were dealt with at the biweekly meetings 
by well-prepared members of the senior class, 
and the differences of opinion expressed in the 
open forum at the close of each lecture led to 
a clarification of the correct and true Thomistic 
view of many of the problems which soon will 
be directly affecting the world of tomorrow. 




Labor Academy 



The Labor Academy, open to students ma- 
joring in Economics, was organized in 1935 to 
encourage the study of Catholic principles ap- 
plicable to the labor problems in the United 
States. This academy was organized with a 
threefold purpose: to stimulate personal re- 
search and individual interest in the historical 
development of, and contemporary relation- 
ships among capital, management, labor, and 
the community in these problems ; to obtain 
and classify scientific and unbiased pamphlets, 
periodicals, and similar reference materials for 
use by the Faculty, members of the Debating 
Societies and Lecture Teams, members of the 
Academy and other undergraduates interested 
in these problems ; to engender an appreciation 
of the pronouncements upon the moral relation- 
ships between capital and labor contained in 
Papal Encyclicals. 

The weekly meetings of the Academy were 
featured by many lectures on labor problems. 
President Frank McGrath was the first speaker 
of the year, giving a discussion of "The Church 
and the Social Order." 

McGrath was followed by John Stodder, '45, 
who discussed the problem which is uppermost 
today in the minds of millions of our country- 
men, "Manpower." Paul McCusker then gave 
a lecture on "The Dangers of and to Labor 
Unions." 

"A Report of the Proceedings of the Con- 
ventions of the C. I. O. and the A. F. of L." 
was delivered by John Hourigan ; and Thomas 
Casey spoke on "Current Labor Issues." 



President 
FRANCIS J. McGRATH 



I ' ice-President 

Secretary 

Moderator 



John T. Hourigan 

John W. Stodder, '45 

Rev. Thomas E. Shortell, S.J. 




Francis J. McGrath 
President 




French Academy 



President 
P. RICHARD POULIN 



Vice-President 
Secretary 
Librarian 
Moderator 



George F. Geary, '44 

Roy W. J. Riel, '45 

Edward J. Comiskey, '44 

Francis P. O'Hara, D.U.P. 




P. Richard Poulin 
President 



Though the accelerated scholastic program 
curtailed many planned activities, the French 
Academy has enjoyed a successful year. Meet- 
ings were held weekly. The aim of the organ- 
ization has been twofold ; first to encourage 
conversation and this has been achieved by di- 
viding the members into small groups; sec- 
ondly to acquaint the students with the glorious 
heritage of France, its culture. 

Last June the academy held a seance in which 
all the members assembled for a buffet lunch- 
eon. Stephen Barone, '43 and William Larson, 
'43 presented a skit, everyone joined in the 
singing of popular French songs, and Dr. 
O'Hara, our moderator, thanked us for our ef- 
forts. President Poulin, '43 acted as Master 
of Ceremonies. 

he Croise, the bi-monthly college French pub- 
lication, was likewise very active this year. Wal- 
ter Moynihan, '44 was Editor-in-Chief. The 
associate editors were: David Murphy, '43, 
Anthony Tomasiello, '43, Richard Poulin, '43, 
F. Hamilton Lane, '44, George Geary, '44, Ed- 
ward Comiskey, '44, Roy Riel, '45, and Thomas 
Mierzwinski, '45. The scope of this paper was 
indeed wide, including French history, litera- 
ture, art, sculpture, music, philosophy and 
religion. 

The aims of the Academy, however, could 
not have been realized without the aid of Dr. 
Francis P. O'Hara, for whose solicitudes we 
owe a large debt of gratitude. 




Choir 



From the rich treasure chest of Catholic litur- 
gical music, the Chapel Choir has, during the 
past year, selected some of the more precious 
gems to present to the student body. Ever the 
patroness of the arts, the Church through the 
ages has fostered and encouraged a combination 
of its liturgy and the exquisite music which it 
inspires. The words of the Mass, the prayers 
of Saints, the devout reflections of unknown 
poets mingled with celestial notes so sublime 
and so beautiful, are undoubtedly a form of 
worship more than pleasing to God. 

The untiring efforts of the moderator and 
the unprecedented zeal of the choir members 
have resulted in a program that has given a fair 
cross-section of this bountiful store of music. 
On the Feast of Christ the King, the choral 
group presented Carnevali's "Stella Matutina." 
The Feast of the Immaculate Conception occa- 
sioned another Mass equally beautiful. In- 
cluded in this year's repertoire were "Tantum 
Ergo," Antiqua, Rovonello, Gregorian (Span- 
ish), Verdussen, S.J. ; "Jesum Christum" and 
"Regem Regum," by Yon; "Ave Maria," Fr. 
Witt; "Justorum Animae," by Kothe; "Salve 
Regina," Gregorian; "O Gloriosa Virginum" 
by de la Tombelle; and an elaborate program 
of Christmas hymns: "Flos de Radice," "O 
Bienheureuse Nuit," "Gesu Bambino," "O 
Holy Night," and the "Adeste Fidelis" of 
Novello-Reilly. 



Organist 



Thomas L. Rafferty, '46 



Soloists 



Everett Hewitt, '44 Kenneth Sullivan, '44 

Joseph Garland, '44 Raymond Lyddy, '45 

Thomas Phelan, '45 



Moderator 



Daniel I. Foley, S.J. 




Thomas L. Rafferty 
Organist 




Senior Spring Formal 

(JUNIOR PROMENADE) 



Chairman 
RICHARD DUBORD 

Committee 
Ryan A. Cuneo Kevin J. McCarty 

Richard J. Martell George A. Coyne 




Shep Fields 



The long-awaited Junior Prom for the Class 
of '43 never arrived, but in its place came the 
Spring Formal of the Class of 1943. The prom 
was caught in the accelerated program and the 
class had reached its senior year before time 
cculd be taken out for the perennial festivities. 
True to tradition, the dance was held in the 
main ballroom of the Hotel Bancroft on a Fri- 
day night — this one being the fifth of June. 

"Shep" Fields, his new band and music, 
played for the dancing; the great variety of ef- 
fects offered by the peculiar arrangements of 
instruments in Shep's orchestra made a big hit 
with all the guests. In keeping with the season 
of the year the hall was decorated with delicate 
blossoms and Summer Formal dress was the 
order of the evening. 

The dance was well patronized by the classes 
then at the college. The Spring Formal in- 
augurated a never-to-be-forgotten weekend for 
the class ; the war, with all its shortages, did 
not cause any shortage of fun, joviality and gen- 
eral good spirit at the Spring Formal of 1943. 




^^ 




THE NAVAL INSTRUCTORS 



THE CADET OFFICERS 




N. H. 0. T. C 




Captain C. Julian Wheeler, U.S.N. 
Cofnmanding Officer of the Unit 



Battalion Commander 
LIEUT. COMMANDER PAUL HOPPER 

Battalion Sub-Commander 
Lieutenant J. Robert Connors 

1st Company Commander 
Lieutenant William W. Shelbourne 

2nd Company Commander 
Lieutenant John B. Noone 

3rd Company Commander 
Lieutenant Paul V. O'Leary 



Adjutant 
Lieutenant (j. g.) Philip C. Larkin 

1st Platoon Commander 
Lieutenant (j. g.) Frederick T. Doyle 

1st Platoon Commander 
Lieutenant (j. g.) Daniel D. Donovan 

1st Platoon Commander 
Lieutenant (j. g.) Edwin P. Meyer 




D. and B. Commander 
Lieutenant (j. g.) Vincent D. Celentano 

Commissary 
Ensign John K. Garrity 

2nd Platoon Commander 
Ensign John E. Roe 

2nd Platoon Commander 
Ensign Mark A. Lillis 

2nd Platoon Commander 
Ensign F. J. Maloney 



Paul F. Hopper, Lieut. Comdr. 
Battalion Commander 







Worcester Club 






President 




JOHN E. LAVIN 


Vice-President 


. Robert E. Maloney, '44 


Secretary 


. John E. Moriarty, '45 


Treasurer 


Robert V. McCarthy 


Moderator 


. Rev. Raymond F. X. Cahill, S.J. 



John E. Lavin 
President 



T H L E T I C S 



In 1874 the baseball team be- 
gan meeting major leaguers. An- 
other quarter-century sate stars 
like Barry, Carrigan and Dugan 
playing thirty-game schedules. In 
1897 the track team beat Yale in 
the O'Kane gym and set a stand- 
ard ably upheld by such Olympic 
runners as Larivee. Tierney. 
Quinn. and Ring of later days. 
The first football team took the 
field in 1896. From O'Donnell 
to Osmanski the tale of gridiron 
glory has been a bright one. 





CROSS CE 





^*fr 



I I 




REV. JOHN F. DEVLIN, S.J 

Faculty Moderator of Athletics 



BASEBALL 







Johnny Bezemes 



THE TEAM : 

First Row. left to right: E. Me- 
rullo, E. Murphy, K. Mulcahy, 
E. Morgan (Captain), W. Mor- 
gan, J. Scondras, J. Bezemes. 
Second Row, left to right: H. 
Gerry, W. Connolly, W. Mills, 
P. Rosetti, M. Connolly, R. Sli- 
ney. Third Roir. left to right: 
T. Hoar (Manager), R. Milnar, 
J. Barry (Coach), P. Guiney, J. 
O'Brien (Assistant Manager). 






Thomas Hoar, Manager 



Ed Murphy 



Coach Jack Barry 




RED SDX GAME 




Manny Merullo 



Coach Jack Barry brings out his 1942 edition of 
the Crusader baseball team on April 13 . 
Weather allows only four days of outdoor practice 
before the Red Sox come to town, seeking their first 
pennant since 1918 . . . Final score, Boston 6. Holy 
Cross 5. 

Game is just as tight as it sounds . . . Pitchers 
Ernie Ford and Ed Murphy hold the Sox to but eight 
hits, while the Barrymen get six from Hughson and 
Hash . . . There are 3500 people on hand, and all 
of them shivering. They see the Cross jump into an 
early lead as Johnny Bezemes draws first blood in the 
opening frame . . . Boston waits until the fourth 
before they decide to score, and then four runs 
dribble across . . . Taking the hint, Holy Cross 
waits until the fifth inning and then with two away 
Ray Milnar singles with the bases full. Alex Nahi- 
gian pounds two more across with a long single to 
left and Jim Scondras parks another offering in back 
of second base to knock in the fourth tally. Man- 
ager Joe Cronin brings all his stars to Worcester with 
the exception of Bobby Doerr, who is injured. 



FORDHAM GAME 

Holy Cross opens its intercollegiate baseball sea- 
son ... It looks like a bright sunny day for all, but 
at the end of the ninth inning Fordham comes 
through with three runs to win, 3-1. 

Ernie Ford again starts the game, and until the 
ninth he allows only three scattered hits. Four errors, 
however, prove to be no help to a pitcher, even 
though his mates gather eight safeties from the Ford- 
ham moundsmen . . . Only Crusader tally comes in 




ptf C^j ■ 




Bill Morgan 




v- 




the sixth inning when Merullo, little "Manny," sin- 
gles sharply to center to score Roy Williams. 

It is a pitcher's day . . . Ford hits the peak in the 
seventh. With men on first and third and no outs, 
Ford strikes out the next batter, gets the next man 
to pop up to Joe Pullano behind the plate, and then 
deflects an infield knock from the third batter over 
to Merullo at short, who makes the putout. 

Tis still cold in Worcester, but in spite of the 
weather about 1500 interested fans turned out for 
the game, the only collegiate contest the Barrymen 
are to drop this season. 



FIRST HARVARD GAME 

In their second intercollegiate start of the season 
the Crusaders coast to an easy 9 to victory over the 
Crimson of Harvard . . . Capt. Al Nahigian, Ernie 
Ford, Joe Pullano, Roy Williams, Jack Creamer, and 
Jack Casey close their intercollegiate careers with a 
final burst of glory before graduating three days later 
. . . Eddie Morgan, although receiving his diploma 
also, is able to commute to the remaining games, 
as was allowed by intercollegiate rules at the outset of 
the war, easing Barry's mind about the all-important 
hot corner . . . Gene O'Connell, junior pitching ace 
from Bridgeport, also turns in his uniform as he 
is called up for training in the Navy Air Corps 
. . . Although idle since April 18th the Crusaders 
retain their batting eyes, for all told they garner 
thirteen hits from the offerings of Harvard's Lou 
Clay . . . The Purple settles the issue in the very 
first inning piling up a four-run advantage ... Ed 
Murphy holds the boys from Cambridge to four well 
scattered hits allowing only one Crimson player to 
reach second. 



FIRST BOSTON COLLEGE 
GAME 

First of a home and home series with the Maroon 
and Gold . . . Game played at Chestnut Hill before 
a large home-coming crowd . . . series cut from 
three games to two this year because of the national 
emergency . . . Crusaders draw first blood, walking 
off with a 12 to 6 victory in a sloppily played contest 
. . . "Little Ed" Murphy starts on the mound for 
the Purple and gets off to a shaky start with the 
Eagles blasting out three runs in the last half of the 
first . . . The Cross squeezes over one in the second 
and moves ahead with three in the third . . . The 
Heightsmen tie it up in the fourth and move ahead 
6 to 5 in the fifth . . . Here the Crusaders awake 
with a vengeance and push over two in the sixth and 
five in the hectic seventh to complete the day's scor- 
ing . . . Kev Mulcahy, "Red" Sliney, and "Buster" 
Mills make their Varstiy debuts . . . Everyone gets 
at least one hit, with Mulcahy, Bezemes, Scondras, 
Morgan, and Sliney rapping out two. 



FIRST YALE GAME 

Fitton Field's beautiful baseball diamond . . . 
Yale comes up for the first tilt of a home and home 
series ... a pleasant May afternoon, and Yale takes 
the short end of a 14-4 count. 

Kev Mulcahy starts his second game for the Cru- 
saders in the left field spot and Kev immediately tees 
off on the second pitch for a home run . . . what 
a wallop! . . . Before the fray is over the Winthrop 
flash garners five hits out of six appearances at the 
plate . . . The Purple gets sixteen blasts, all told 



. . . "Red" Sliney accounts for three, Bezemes and 
Mills two apiece. 

The Crusaders hit Johnny Neville's offerings al- 
most at will . . . bat around in the big seventh . . . 
eight runs come across in that frame . . . Scondras 
gets a big triple. Harper Gerry pitches a tidy seven- 
hitter in his first varsity start. 

Yale is not quite sure what hit them, but they 
are a wiser if sadder team come supper-time . . . 
Coach Joe Wood is finishing his last year with old 
Eli. 



DARTMOUTH GAME 



So we're up at Hanover now . . . The Crusaders 
make it four straight in the credit column by taking 
this one 4-1. Originally scheduled to be a two-game 
series, the first Dartmouth game was cancelled. 

The Crusaders are really hot by this time . . . best 
evidence is Ed Murphy's two-hit pitching . . . Only 
a pair of errors in the eighth prevent it from being 
a shutout. In the meantime the Big Green chalks up 
six misplays and the bigger Purple manages eight 
scattered hits . . . The scoring starts in the second 
inning . . . Eddie Morgan stands upon first by 
virtue of an error, goes to second on an infield out 
and romps home on Paul Rosetti's single to left . . . 
Morgan and Rosetti also lead the Crusaders at the 
plate . . . two apiece. 

The Cross scores one in the fifth, sixth and sev- 
enth, while Dartmouth puts over its lone tally in the 
eighth . . . "Snooks" Hughes hurls for the Indians 
and with better support he might have made a con- 
test of it . . . but Murphy is insurmountable, walk- 
ing four and fanning seven . . . Holy Cross has now 
taken four games in a row from Dartmouth in the 
last three years. 



SECOND HARVARD GAME 



The Crusaders take on Harvard for the second 
time, and they have their hands full . . . 6-3 is the 
final count, Holy Cross on top, but the fray goes ten 
innings. 

Entering the top of the eighth inning Harvard 
sports a 3-0 advantage in this game at Cambridge. 
The Purple make it 3-1 by the time the inning is 
over. Come the ninth, and enter big Chet Wasilew- 
ski. Pinch-hitting for Ed Murphy, Wasilewski slams 
out a triple to deep left scoring Paul Guiney, who 
had singled before him. Ray Milnar hoists a long 
fly and Wasilewski scores the tying run . . . Then 
Chester takes over on the mound and retires the 
Crimson in the last half of the ninth. 

Tenth inning . . . "Chief" Scondras goes to first 
on an error . . . Morgan sacrifices him to second 
. . . Mills walks . . . Sliney singles, Scondras 
scores . . . Guiney sacrifices to score Mills from 
third . . . Wasilewski walks, but Mulcahy singles 
Guiney home . . . what a day. 

This is the closest win the Barrymen have had to 
date . . . They registered thirteen hits from two 
Harvard hurlers, with Mulcahy getting four of them. 



SECOND YALE GAME 



The Elis go down to their second defeat before 
the masterful hurling of our own Harper Gerry . . . 
this time a brilliant two-hitter . . . Harp faces only 
twenty-nine batters . . . whiffs twelve . . . walks a 
grand total of none . . . best pitching performance 
in years on Yale field . . . Final score 12 to 0. 





Kev Mulcahy continues his phenomenal work at 
bat with his second successive four-hit afternoon . . . 
one of them tagged for three bases . . . "Chief" 
Scondras settles the issue in the opening frame with 
a tremendous two-run homer ... all told, Purple 
batsmen clean up on two Blue hurlers to the sweet 
tune of eighteen safeties . . . Barrymen also have a 
perfect day afield . . . only Yalemen to reach base 
are the renowned Ted Harrison in the fourth and Ed 
Goodspeed in the seventh . . . Neither get further 
than the first sack . . . Harp just barely misses a 
perfect game but the day is perfect in every other 
way. 



SECOND BOSTON COLLEGE 
GAME 



The Crusaders finish out the season in sparkling 
style by dispatching of Boston College, 13-5 . . . 
An Alumni Day crowd is on hand at Fitton Field to 
watch Holy Cross beat B. C. for the seventh consecu- 
tive time in three years. 

Jack Barry is a happy man. The victory is his 
399th and ends his 22nd season on the hill . . . The 
season's record is now seven wins and one loss. 
Barry's all-time record is 399 victories, 71 defeats 
and five ties. 

Again Ed Murphy does all the pitching . . . and 
everyone does the hitting. Everyone scores at least 
once, too . . . The Eagles open with a run in the 
first . . . The Crusaders counter with three, then go 
on to score two in the second, two in the third, and 
five in the fourth . . . Murphy holds the Maroon to 
eight hits . . . his mates get exactly twice that 
number. 

Bezemes, Morgan, Scondras, Guiney, Mills and 
Sliney star at the plate . . .A beautiful day to end 
a most successful season. 







^K" 






Kev Mulcahy 



Jim Scondras 





Ed Sunega, Manager 



Coach Bart Sullivan 



THE SQUAD: 

First Row. left to right: P. Whitney, J. O'Leary, C. Gillis, W. McKone, W. Whitney, 
F. Kelley, (Captain), P. Hines, J. Mallahan, J. Burke, A. Mulkern, W. Layton. Second 
Row, left to right: J. Grzebien, T. Smith, G. Cashman, J. Brennan, C. Grenier, F. Ferrick, 
F. Rameaka, N. Keller, D. Schmitz, P. Fox, C. Netter, R. Kerwick, P. Long, R. Dunn, 
T. Phelan, E. Sunega (Manager). 




It happened one noon last March in the Post- 
Office. Two junior trackmen, who had hung 
up their indoor spikes a few days earlier, were 
standing near the wall and enjoying the pros- 
pect of a few weeks lay-off. Up came Manager 
John McNally. "Bart wants you fellows out 
tomorrow. We have a meet with Amherst 
on the 27th." 

And so Coach Bart Sullivan was putting 
three dozen Crusader trackmen through their 
paces on the boards behind Carlin the next day. 
For Bart it was the 31st season as track coach 
on the Hill. It was in 1912 that he first came 
to Pakachoag, fresh from his triumphs in New 
England racing circles as a miler and half- 
miler. Yes, this was his 32nd season, and it 




TRACK 



promised to be an interesting one. After Am- 
herst there was Dartmouth, Brown, Harvard, 
and B. C. ; then the intercollegiate meets. The 
war had brought some changes: there would be 
no opportunity to attempt to wrest the New 
England crown back from Rhode Island, for 
the New England Intercollegiate had been 
called off for the duration. But marines and 
soldiers who hiked endless miles with heavy 
packs were thankful, some of them, for their 
college track training. No, track would not be 
discontinued for the duration. It was more 
necessary than ever. 

Bart recalled the spring of nineteen-forty, 
when his Freshman team had routed all oppo- 
sition. That had been one of the strongest 
Freshman squads ever to wear the Purple. He 
had looked forward to the day when its mem- 
bers would be Seniors. But many had already 
gone, most into the armed forces — Hines, Cro- 
nin, Gallagher, Calabrese, Handrahan, Leach, 
Rupelli. Others would follow soon, before 
their senior year began. 

Still, prospects were not gloomy. His Seniors 
— Capt. Frank Maloney, George Gilson, and 
Leo Racine — would be around for most of the 
season. Among the Juniors was the relay team 
of the winter campaign — Bob McGlone, Ed 




Captain Fran Kelley 



Charley Gillis 



Marcorelle, Bill McKone, and Charley Gillis. 
Bob and Ed could run the dashes and broad 
jump while Charley and Bill continued to run 
quarters. Ken Fisher would do the high- 
jumping, and John Campanale would be a 
threat in the 440 and 880, and Fran Kelley was 
ready to double in the half and mile. Bill 
Whitney would run the quarter, while Ed 
Murphy and Johnny Grigas furnished strength 
in the weight events. 

Among the Sophomores were Joe Mallahan, 
promising distance man; Chet Lakomski, who 
had a 47-foot shotput to his credit ; Paul Hines, 
understudy to Gilson in the hurdles; Charley 
Carr, carrot-topped broad-jumper ; John Burke, 
distance man ; and Dan Weitekamp, middle 
distance runner. 

Standouts among the Freshmen were Jim 
O'Leary, an up-and-coming miler; Frank Ra- 



meaka, hammer-thrower; and half-milers Nick 
Kellar and Frank Ferrick. 

And so the squad which met the Lord Jeffs 
was by no means a weak one, as it proved by 
its 57-38 victory. 

The next encounter came on April 14 against 
Dartmouth, whose power in the distance events 
enabled them to scalp the Crusaders by a mar- 
gin of 60 to 39- Highlighting the meet were 
John Grigas and George Gilson, both with 
double victories, and Charley Gillis, who 
cracked the Hanover track record for the 440 
in winning that event. 

The team bounced back into the win column, 
however, with a smashing 89-45 victory over 
Brown at Providence. Leading the attack were 
Gillis, McKone, Marcorelle and McGlone, who 
accounted for grand slams in the 100 and 220. 
Kelley topped the milers. 




Bill McKone 



Bill Whitney 



In the quadrangular meet with Harvard, 
Northeastern, and Rhode Island the Crusaders 
finished third behind the Rams and Crimson. 
The Crusaders showed their usual power in the 
running events, but were unable to match Har- 
vard and Rhode Island in the field. Bob Mc- 
Glone and Ed Marcorelle performed well in 
their last appearances in Holy Cross uniforms 
before leaving for the armed forces. 

On May 9 George Gilson won four events 
in the B. C. meet as he led his teammates to an 
86-49 triumph over the Eagles. 

Representing Holy Cross at the I C 4-A 
meet in New York were Gilson and Kelley, our 
new captain. George sang his swan song as a 
Crusader by winning the high hurdles race, 
while Fran placed sixth in the mile run. Kelley 
won the New England A. A. U. 880-yard run in 
Boston the next week-end, then took fourth in 



the N. A. A. U. Junior 1500-meter run in New 
York later in the month. 

The summer months sped by quickly, and by 
the time school was usually opening the cross- 
country and fall track candidates had a week of 
practice behind them. The cross-country men 
were Kelley, O'Leary, Ferrick, Bill Leighton, 
Dick Kerwick, Carl Grenier and Al Mulkern. 
The harriers lost to Harvard and Rhode Island 
in their only dual and triangular meets, and fin- 
ished tenth in the New England Intercollegiate 
Championships. 

The winter season prospects are uncertain, 
but Bart Sullivan hopes to be able to send a 
team against Tufts on January 16, and intends 
to enter relay teams in the big meets. In addi- 
tion to seasoned campaigners many promising 
Freshmen and Sophomores have joined the 
squad. 




Jim Athy, Manager 





Joe Mendes 



In the past three years the Holy Cross golf 
team has regained much of the prestige it had 
back in the days of the immortal Willie Turnesa 
who graduated from the Cross with the Na- 
tional Amateur Championship in his pocket. 
Coached by Charles Donnelly, the roster was 
filled with golfers of the highest calibre who 
carried the Purple banner magnificently into 
battle. 

Laughin' Larry Murphy and Joe Mendes, the 
two graduating members of the team, along 
with Jim O'Leary, '42, Joe Monahan, '44, now 
in the service of his country, John Gahan, '44, 
Ken Boylger, '44, Jim Athy, '44, and Eddie 
Morone, '45, have done considerable to put 
Holy Cross among the country's leaders on the 
intercollegiate fairways. 

In 1941, Larry Murphy struck a peak which 
only Turnesa before him had done in Holy 
Cross history when he brilliantly annexed the 
New England Intercollegiate Individual Cham- 
pionship with successive rounds of 74 and 72 
at Oakley Country Club in Boston, a title which 
he still holds. Joe Mendes, the former West- 




G 
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F 



Chester Junior Champion, also competed in this 
event and finished in the first ten. 

In the spring of 1942 the team hit its stride 
defeating Harvard 9-0 in the opener and losing 
only to Yale 5-4 in the play-offs of the New 
England Intercollegiate League to complete its 
finest showing in recent years. The Yale match 
was not decided until Joe Mendes finally suc- 
cumbed to Bob Kuntz on the 19th hole. Yale 
went on to win the Eastern title after this 
match. 

The team climaxed its fine season with a trip 
to South Bend, Indiana, home of Notre Dame, 
where it competed in the National Intercol- 
legiate Championships. The team competing 
consisted of Murphy, Mendes, Monahan and 
Gahan. The players, experiencing difficulty on 
the fast middle-West greens, did not score as 
well as they expected but several individual 



rounds were just above par. Joe Monahan led 
the scoring with rounds of 75-76, but went 
down to defeat in his first match 4 and 3. 

As a preview to the Holy Cross-Dartmouth 
football encounter, Murphy led the golfers 
against the Indian golf team in the morning. 
Playing without the services of Joe Monahan 
and Joe Mendes, Holy Cross lost another thrill- 
ing match 5 to 4. Murphy carded a sparkling 
73 to win his match by a 6 and 5 margin. Ed 
Morone and Jim Athy were also victorious in 
singles matches but the Crusaders were able to 
get only one point out of three possible in the 
four-ball matches. 

Whether winning or losing these men have 
always done their best for Holy Cross and have 
spread the spirit of sportsmanship and good 
fellowship in all their travels. They wore the 
Purple well, these Holy Cross golfers. 



F 







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Sheldon Beise 
B.ickfield Coach 



9 



Hugh J. Devore 
End Coach 





J. R. Ludlow Wray 
Line Coach 



Albert D. (Hop) Riopel 

/. V . Coach 





Edward F. Danowitz 
Manager 



A 



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UcrtAUy &ougxI 



First Roiv, left to right: E. Danowitz 
(Manager), J. Grigas, F. Kleniewski, 
A. Natowich, W. Sartorelli, T. Alber- 
ghini, J. Quinn, E. Murphy (Captain), 
J. Potenza, J. Scondras, J. Bezemes, R. 
Gibson, A. Scanlan (Coach). Second 
Row. left to right: H. Devore (End 
Coach), D. Weitekamp, G. Connor, W. 
Swiacki, M. Downey, A. Wizbicki, J. 
DiGangi, R. Sullivan, R. Ball, P. No- 
lan, B. Macy, S. Murphy, T. Strojny, A. 
Riopel (J. V. Coach), A. Wyre (Train- 
er). Third Row, left to right: L. Wray 
(Line Coach), G. Titus (Captain-Elect), 
J. Landrigan, W. Hoar, L. Celentano, G. 
Schum, R. Sherwood, E. Galuska, R. 
Lambert, R. Lawson, C. Wasilewski, R. 
Yablonski, R. Sliney, F. Ruggiero, S. 
Beise (Backfield Coach). 



^AnJz" Soanlan - 



Coach of Football 



Holy Cross 6 — Dartmouth 17 



The debut of "Ank" Scanlan and his 1942 
Crusaders . . . with a Good Luck floral horse- 
shoe for the new coach and a 17-6 victory for 
the Big Green ... A game to be remembered 
long after the defeat is forgotten . . . The in- 
troduction of the Scanlanized single-wing . . . 
with Jarrin' John Grigas bowing in as a pass- 
ing halfback . . . Johnny Bezemes triple- 
threating at tailback . . . Capt. Ed Murphy 
and Tom Alberghini up front . . . Across the 
line of scrimmage a fighting band of Indians 
eager to wipe out the memory of Bill Osman- 
ski's 1936 gallop . . . 25,000 eager fans flood 
Fitton ... to watch the Purple battle the 
Green in the feature tilt in the East . . . and 
see the Scanlanmen force the first period play 
. . . until the kicking of Douglas and Frost 
turns the tide temporarily . . . Moans and 
groans when Mai Frost circles the Holy Cross 
left end for a second quarter score . . . Gloom 
as Capt. Kast adds a seventh point for the Han- 



overians . . . but sorrow turns to joy as Be- 
zemes' sparkling kickoff return launches the 
Crusaders on a post-half drive . . . culminated 
by Johnny's touchdown pass to Ray Ball . . . 
Capt. Ed's conversion try is wide . . . but 
hope runs high as Bezemes scampers 40 yards 
with a Dartmouth punt . . . until the Big Bad 
Wolfe huffs and puffs . . . and runs back a 
Purple kick close to pay dirt ... A weak-side 
scamper by the same Wolfe . . . and another 
T. D. . . .A conversion makes it 14-6 . . . 
Three more points on a sharply-angled Kast 
field goal . . . but Murphy and Co. storm back 
. . . with a closing-minute advance . . . fea- 
turing a Sherwood-McAfee aerial to the visit- 
ors' two-yard stripe . . . where a stubborn 
McLaughry line puts up a stonewall defense 
. . . insuring an invader victory ... A 
Purple defeat . . . but a glimpse of latent 
power soon to be realized and future glory to 
be reaped. 





Holy Crass D — Duquesne 25 



The Iron Dukes stretch their streak to sixteen 
straight by means of a decisive 25-0 victory over 
the Crusaders . . . 16,000 watch Coach Al 
Donelli's charges set their newest record . . . 
One of the best exhibitions of ball-handling 
and deception seen on Fitton Field in many a 
moon . . . Capt. Joe Goode and his mates 
prove just too good for the still inexperienced 
Cross eleven . . . George Connor becomes the 
first freshman in modern times to start a var- 
sity ball game for H. C. . . . and plays a whale 
of a game at tackle . . . Singlewing still rough 
around the edges but 100% improved over 
Dartmouth game . . . Redbirds take command 
right at the start ... a baffling now-you- 
see-it, now-you-don't attack produces a score in 
three swift plays . . . 6-0 . . . Capt. Ed 
Murphy and mates begin to solve the visitors' 
trick attack and set them on their heels for the 
rest of the half . . . Cross penetrates to Du- 
quesne's 13 on a Grigas-Bezemes pass . . . 
Nanny nipped by Gottleib's last-ditch tackle 
. . . but three of Jarrin' John's tosses fail to 
connect and the invaders take over . . . The 



break of the game goes by the board as Grigas 
just misses an interception of Setcavage's flat 
pass with a clear field ahead and seconds to half- 
time. . . Kielbasa starts the Dukes goalward 
again after intermission when a Purple fumble 
is recovered in Cross territory . . . Two passes, 
three line bucks, and Setcavage goes over . . . 
12-0 . . . Grigas makes a dazzling runback of 
kickoff . . . Jansante's shoe-string tackle stops 
him from going all the way . . . The Dukes 
hold and with the ball on their own 20 Kiel- 
basa sweeps all the way to pay-dirt on a hidden- 
ball naked reverse . . . beautifully executed 
. . . with ball-carrier almost stopped three 
times but finally stumbling over . . . Dis- 
heartened Crusaders take to the air but Gott- 
leib intercepts . . . Goode spins for 25 . . . 
and Setcavage lofts one to Jansante for a 34- 
yard touchdown . . . 25-0 . . . Purple bounds 
back as Wizbicki and McAfee spark late-game 
drive . . . Team more impressive than score 
shows . . . defense and pass attack greatly 
improved. 




ft r vj^W* 




Holy Cross 




Ft. Totten 



The first 1942 victory for the Scanlanmen 
. . . and what a victory . . . 60-0 ... at the 
expense of a service eleven from Fort Totten 
. . . technically speaking, the 701st provisional 
anti-aircraft regiment . . . Home-coming for 
three former Holy Cross stars . . . Frank Saba, 
varsity sparkplug for three seasons . . . Bob 
Barton, spectacular 1941 freshman end . . . 
and Jimmy Scavone, a standout Worcester ath- 
lete and a triple-threat yearling back in 1940 
. . . The Fort Totten eleven, sparked by Saba, 
starts out like a world-beater . . . Scavone and 
Saba rip off yardage down the middle . . . but 
a rare Saba fumble starts H. C. off on the vic- 
tory trail . . . Bezemes skirts right end on a 
reverse for 25 yards and a touchdown . . .It's 
o-o-only the beginning, folks . . . Andy Nato- 
wich polishes off a sustained march with a one- 
yard scoring plunge . . . Enter Dick Gibson, 
the Lewiston speed merchant . . . Taking a 
page from the Duquesne book of tricks, Dick 
romps over from the Totten 19 behind perfect 



blocking . . . Captain Ed Murphy adds an- 
other six points on a 30-yard pass from the irre- 
pressible Mr. Gibson . . . Score at the end of 
the first half, 27-0 . . . Jarrin' John highlights 
the third period with a long off-tackle gallop in 
the inimitable Grigas style for touchdown num- 
ber five . . . Steve Murphy rubs it in with a 
pay-dirt buck . . . but Gibson clinches of- 
fensive honors ... by scampering into the 
Totten end zone twice more . . . once on a 
53-yard end sweep . . . From the bench comes 
Danny Weitekamp to amaze with a touchdown 
jaunt and a weaving return of an Army punt 
... A brilliant exhibition of offensive strength 
by the Crusaders . . . and dogged, never-say- 
die resistance by the undermanned soldiers 
... a long hoiah especially for Dick Gibson 
and Ed Murphy . . . who converted five ponits 
after ... A peek at the reserves . . . who 
flashed in the third and fourth periods . . . 
The hope that Holy Cross is on the way at last. 




Holy Cross D — Syracuse 19 



The Crusaders outplay the Orangemen in 
every department but the one on which they 
pay off . . . The Score: Syracuse 19, H. C. 
. . . Three routine passes to Paul Berthold, 
the visitors' rangy end, are the only Syracuse 
offensive threats of the game . . . and each is 
responsible for six points . . . Held to a stand- 
still by the ever-improving Purple forward wall 
. . . and gradually beginning to give ground 
before a suddenly awakened Crusader . . . the 
invaders change the entire outlook of the game 
when they pounce on a loose ball on the H. C. 
23 . . . Held on three line smashes . . . 
Tommy Maines fades back and throws a pass 
deep on his left to Berthold . . . who takes it 
on the two and scampers over untouched . . . 
Set back on their heels by the sudden turn of 
events . . . the hard-fighting Crusaders come 
roaring back to pass the visitors dizzy before 
halftime . . . With Bezemes, Grigas, and 
Steve Murphy sidelined by injuries, Danny 
Weitekamp struts his stuff . . . Starting from 
his own 16, the Purple aerial artist moves Holy 
Cross all the way to the Syracuse 18 with his 
rapier-thrust aerials ... At this point, how- 



ever, shoddy blocking, a fumble, and a later in- 
terception stymie the scoring threat . . . Cru- 
sader hopes die somewhat when Weitekamp is 
hurt on the second half kickoff . . . but 
quickly rise when the hitherto dormant Cross 
running attack begins to click . . . Gibson, 
Natowich, and Sliney carry for three first 
downs and narrowly miss a fourth ... as the 
Orange take over on their own 23 . . .A Gib- 
son fumble of a "Bunky" Morris quick-kick is 
recovered by Berthold . . . who repeats his 
touchdown act with Maines on the first play 
from scrimmage . . . Syracuse leads, 13-0 
. . . The Crusaders take to the air with Bobby 
Sherwood pitching . . . but Whitesell inter- 
cepts one and runs it back to the Purple 30 
. . . Enter that scoring play again . . . this 
time from Whitesell to Berthold to make it 19 
for the Orange . . . For Holy Cross the entire 
forward wall is immense even in defeat . . . 
and both the aerial and ground attack appear 
more impressive . . . Defeat can be attrib- 
uted to weak pass defense . . . but the absence 
of Grigas, Murphy, and Bezemes accounts for 
the inexperience in this department. 




Holy Cross 28 — North Carolina State 



The first major win of the 1942 season . . . 
a stunning 28-0 victory over favored North 
Carolina State . . . The Crusaders come to life 
with a vengeance . . . and show "Ank" Scan- 
Ian that they are beginning to master the in- 
tricacies of the singlewing . . . Johnny Be- 
zemes returns to action and plays his best game 
to date in a Holy Cross uniform . . . The 
Purple line continues to impress while shac- 
kling the Wolfpack's running attack and both- 
ering the Southern passers . . . When Capt. 
Ed Murphy drops a Bezemes pass in the clear 
... it appears that the home force is in for 
another bad afternoon . . . Johnny Grigas en- 
ters the game midway in the first period . . . 
and the team begins to roll ... as the backs 
take advantage of crisp blocking ... to riddle 
the vaunted State forward wall . . . Bezemes 
fakes a pass, bolts off tackle, and races 16 yards 
for the first touchdown . . . Capt. Murphy 
adds the first of his three conversions ... In 
the second period Bezemes takes a North Caro- 
lina punt on his own 22 . . . gets perfect 
blocking . . . and dashes 78 yards down the 



sidelines for a score . . . Mr. Jinx rears his 
ugly head again . . . when both Bezemes and 
Grigas aggravate old injuries and retire for the 
afternoon . . . After a scoreless third quarter 
. . . the Scanlanmen pick up the scoring beam 
again . . . on a perfect touchdown pass from 
Dick Gibson to Ed Murphy . . . The reserves 
take over in the closing minutes . . . Chet 
Wasilewski, making his first appearance of the 
season, intercepts a desperation pass . . . with 
only seconds remaining . . . and thunders 30 
yards for the fourth touchdown . . . Bobby 
Sullivan converts for the 28th point . . . Out- 
standing for the rejuvenated Crusaders is the 
line play of Jim Landrigan, Capt. Murphy, and 
Tom Alberghini . . . the inspired running of 
the starring Bezemes, Grigas, Steve Murphy, 
and Joe McAfee . . . and the punting of Andy 
Natowich and Dick Gibson . . . The Purple 
miss Walt Hoar, out for the season with a kid- 
ney injury . . . but large John DiGangi shows 
promise as a guard ... At last Holy Cross 
seems to have arrived. 




Holy Crass B — Colgate G 



The Crusaders continue to roll ... at least 
in the first half . . . Bobby Sullivan starts off 
the game in a style reminiscent of his famed 
brother . . . spins through center for fifteen 
yards on his first varsity ball-carrying assign- 
ment . . . After an exchange of punts Johnny 
Bezemes takes over where he left off against 
North Carolina State . . . contributing a daz- 
zling 38-yard off tackle slant for Holy Cross' 
six points . . . Captain Ed Murphy then misses 
what proves to be the all-important seventh 
point . . . The line from end to end proves 
a stonewall . . . Dick Gibson, still the nation's 
sixth leading punter, gets off a 70-yarder only 
to have it land a foot inside the Colgate end 
zone . . . The second quarter is chiefly a duel 
of pass interceptions . . . each side stealing 
three . . . Ball looks like DiMaggio with a 
leaping one-hander . . . With a minute to go 
until the half, George Connor intercepts a 
McQuade pass at midfield . . . Gibson uncorks 
a long heave to Capt. Ed who is caught from 
behind on the visitors' eight . . . Time for 
only one play . . . Has to be a pass . . . 



which is intercepted on the Colgate two . . . 
The third period turns out to be mainly a punt- 
ing duel with the outstanding Crusader line 
keeping the visitors penned deep in their own 
territory . . . After a Purple scoring drive 
peters out on the Raiders' 19-yard stripe . . . 
the Redmen's long dormant running attack be- 
gins to puncture holes in the fast tiring Cross 
line . . . With Mike Micka, Jules Yakapovich, 
and Al Hanover taking turns, Colgate sweeps 
to an 81 -yard touchdown march on sixteen plays 
. . . the powerful Mr. Micka blating over 
from the one-yard line . . . Bob Orlando, a 
standout guard all afternoon and a place kick 
specialist to boot, gives the Purple supporteers 
heart failure for a minute . . . but Lady Luck 
smiles at last on the Crusaders as his conver- 
sion attempt goes wide . . . H. C. team looks 
great for three quarters and then loses its fire 
. . . Bezemes, Sullivan, Connor, and, of 
course, George Titus turn in some bang-up foot- 
ball . . . Scanlan's eleven still a question mark 
but replete with possibilities. 







Holy Crass 14 — Brawn 20 



First game of the year away from the friendly 
confines of Fitton Field . . . The puzzle of the 
1942 season . . . how the Crusaders could play 
superlative ball in the first period and then do 
a complete about-face ... as the Bruins hus- 
tled from behind to win, 20-14 . . . The Scan- 
lanmen are away fast from the post at the open- 
ing kickoff . . . Bobby Sullivan, wearing 
brother Tom's famous No. 11, spins and churns 
his way through a startled Brown line . . . 
until a Bruin interception removes an early 
scoring threat . . . The Purple is soon on the 
march again . . . with the inspiring Sullivan 
bearing the brunt of the attack . . . Johnny 
Grigas takes a lateral all the way to the six 
. . . Bobby Sullivan lugs the leather over for 
the first touchdown . . . Capt. Ed Murphy 
calmly place-kicks the point after. The big 
Purple line, meanwhile, shackles the Brown 
running attack effectively . . . and the Stah- 
leymen are forced to kick . . . Sullivan and 
Grigas pound out yardage overland . . . but 
a Bezemes to Murphy flat pass puts the clincher 
on the touchdown drive . . . Capt. Ed, head of 
the conversion department, promptly attends to 
business . . . Holy Cross leads 14-0 at the end 
of the first period . . . Skip Stahley's Bruno- 



nians may be down but they are far from out 
... as they show when the brilliant "Doc" 
Savage romps 54 yards around end and down 
the sidelines for a Brown touchdown . . . Jay 
Pattee converts . . . Ank Scanlan's charges 
miss a glorious opportunity to score late in the 
second quarter . . . With the ball on the 
Brown 18, four passes go awry ... At half- 
time the visitors from Worcester still hold a 
convincing 14-7 lead. . . which, unfortunately, 
is short-lived . . . for the never-say-die Bears 
pound the tiring Purple line . . . and march 
for their second score . . . Pattee's conversion 
attempt fails . . . but Brown forces a Cru- 
sader punt and in the fourth period the "S" 
boys, Savage and Swingler, go to work in ear- 
nest . . . Savage fades back and heaves a long 
pass . . . Swingler picks it off his shoe-tops on 
the two-yard line and races over . . . Pattee 
converts again . . . Desperate late-game mea- 
sures by Holy Cross fail to daunt the stiffened 
Brown defense. The final: Brown 20, H. C. 14 
. . . Best player on the field was "Doc" Sav- 
age, bad ankle and all . . . He personally 
ruined Crusader hopes . . . Bobby Sullivan 
was outstanding in a losing cause. 




Holy Cross 13 — Temple D 



A most fitting home-coming for Coach Ank 
. . . and the boys from Philly . . . Sparked 
by Bezemes and Johnny Grigas' long awaited 
return to form, the Crusaders break a long- 
standing jinx as they score on the Owls at 
Temple for the first time . . . and push on to 
win 13-0 . . . The Scanlanmen take command 
of the game right from the start . . . driving 
16 yards to a touchdown the first time they get 
their hands on the ball . . . Set up by Joe 
McAfee's 21 -yard jaunt off tackle . . . Johnny 
Bezemes carries over from the five . . . Capt. 
Ed converts and the Purple goes ahead 7-0 
. . . From then on merely a succession of Cru- 
sader marches stopped just short of scoring ter- 
ritory . . . Only the fine defensive play of big 
George Sutch, Negiman, and Drulis plus a gale- 
like wind (rendering accurate passing impos- 
sible) prevents the Crusaders from rolling up 
an even more impressive total . . . The her- 
alded Purple forward wall, which had tired so 
unbelievably at Brown the week before, finds 
itself again and turns in its most impressive de- 
fensive game to date . . . Owls grind out a 
tremendous 36-yard total overland and surpass 
that by two yards in completing five out of 13 



aerial attempts . . . The Quaker city lads never 
come close to pay-dirt . . . Their best offensive 
thrusts occur in the third period . . . when 
with the wind at their backs they penetrated 
once to the Purple 35 and then to the 25 . . . 
but the aroused H. C. forward wall steps in and 
stops the men of Morrison cold both times 
. . . Final Crusader touchdown materializes 
three plays after the Owls had punted to the 
Cross 46 . . . Sullivan spins up the middle for 
10 . . . Grigas reverses outside his own left 
end for 13 . . . Bezemes, aided by some crisp 
blocking and deft zig-zagging, goes all the way 
from the Temple 30 for the game's longest and 
most spectacular run . . . Final score: 13-0 
. . . Capt. Murphy plays the best defensive 
game of his career with the help of a re- 
awakened forward wall which squelched every 
Temple offensive gesture . . . Grigas runs for 
the first time this year like the old Chelsea 
Choo-Choo of 1941 . . . Bezemes, Sullivan, 
Ball, and McAfee do more than impress . . . 
They're tremendous . . . especially young Mr. 
McAfee, who scintilates before his home town 
rooters. 




Holv Crass 28 -Manhattan 



"Merrily we roll along" . . . becomes the 
theme song of the resurgent Crusaders . . . 
and "We'll beat the Eagles on the 28th" the 
war cry of the H. C. student body ... as the 
ever-dangerous Jaspers of Manhattan fall be- 
fore the Purple, 28-0 ... A nice birthday gift 
for Coach Scanlan . . . More than a mere 
warm-up for the climactic Boston College game, 
the clash with the Kelley Green reveals a vastly 
improved Holy Cross football team . . . that 
has come a long way since the early Dartmouth 
and Duquesne losses . . . On the soggy Fitton 
gridiron two Crusaders stand out in particular 
. . . Bob Sullivan and George Connor . . . 
Sophomore Bob driving and slashing for 135 
of his team's 270-yard total rushing gain . . . 
Freshman George, a nonpareil at tackle, show- 
ing once again why experts have dubbed him 
the finest lineman in recent years at H. C. . . . 
The sloppy going hampers the Scanlanmen in 
the first period . . . but they adjust their scor- 
ing sights in the second quarter ... to march 
87 yards for the first of four touchdowns . . . 
Johnny Bezemes, Johnny Grigas, and Bob Sul- 
livan divide the ball-carrying burden on this 
overland trek . . . but to Bezemes goes the 



honor of driving over for the first score on a 
reverse from the Jasper two . . . Capt. Ed 
Murphy adds the first of his four conversions 
. . . Five minutes later Bezemes catches the 
Manhattan pass defenders napping . . . on a 
45 -yard scoring pass to Capt. Murphy . . . 
Late in the third period a brilliant Bezemes run- 
back of an enemy punt sets up the third Purple 
score . . . On the next play Peabody Johnny 
fumbles the slippery leather, scoops it up, fakes 
a run to the right, but instead pitches with 
lightning-like motion and unerring accuracy to 
Johnny Grigas, free on the Manhattan 10-yard 
stripe . . . Needless to say, the Choo-Choo 
hustles over for his second touchdown of the 
campaign . . . Bob Sullivan's 21-yard scoring 
gallop in the final period climaxes a 56-yard ad- 
vance ... Ed Murphy's successful placement 
— his fourth of the matinee — winds up the 
day's scoring . . . Steve Murphy takes over the 
offensive burden in the final minutes of the 
game and impresses with his ball-toting . . . 
All hands report in excellent physical condi- 
tion after the game . . . and rarin' to pluck the 
high-flying Eagle from its lofty perch atop the 
nation's grid leaders. 




Holy Crass 55 — Boston College 12 



H. C. 55— B. C. 12 . . . Whe-ew! . . . 
The high spot of the football season . . . and 
the greatest upset in 1942 . . . The Crusaders 
roll up the biggest score in the history of the 
hallowed Jesuit series . . . and against the "in- 
vincible" Bowl-bound Eagles, too . . . What 
an afternoon for Purple rooters! . . . Capt. 
Ed. Murphy, Johnny Bezemes, Johnny Grigas, 
Tom Alberghini, and the whole Cross team 
make history on the Fenway Park gridiron . . . 
The Scanlanmen roar to a quick touchdown, the 
first of eight . . . Bob Sullivan, again an in- 
spiring fullback, plunges over from the two 
for the score . . . Capt. Ed. Murphy's first of 
seven conversions puts the Crusader out in 
front 7-0 . . . But the gilded Eagle screams 
back to score on a Connolly to Currivan aerial 
bomb . . . Alberghini blocks the attempted 
conversion, however, to preserve a slim one- 
point margin . . . The aroused Crusaders 
really go to work in the second period . . . 
Grigas tosses a 15 -yard bulls-eye to Bezemes 
for the second score . . . The much-publicized 
Eagles are distraught as Ank Scanlan's charges 
begin to ration Sugar (Bowl) . . . The spar- 
kling Bezemes chucks a 2 3 -yard grenade to Ed 
Murphy for the third T. D. . . . Boston Sports 
scribes pale visibly as H. C. leads, 20-6, at half- 
time . . . Ray Ball calls for effective mouse- 



trap plays as Ail-American Johnny Grigas 
zooms through the crumbling Eagle line for 
seven- and 15 -yard scoring slants . . . Bezemes 
intercepts a Boyce pass and with the help of 
timely blocking rambles 67 yards through Ma- 
roon and Gold jerseys . . . The Grigas to Be- 
zemes aerial route supplies touchdown No. 7 
. . . Andy Natowich concludes the rout of 
the nation's Number One eleven on a seven- 
yard off tackle dash . . . Even a second B. C. 
scoring pass didn't matter at this point . . . 
55 points — count 'em — 55 points . . . Perhaps 
the greatest victory in all Holy Cross history 
... A great team victory with every Crusader 
a full-fledged star . . . Great end play by Capt. 
Ed Murphy, unheralded freshman Tom Camp- 
bell, and Bill Swiacki . . . Superb efforts by 
Tom Alberghini, the incomparable George Con- 
nor, John DiGangi, Ted Strojny, Jim Landri- 
gan, Broni Macy . . . George Titus, as usual 
. . . Dynamic running and passing by the 
touchdown twins, Bezemes and Grigas . . . 
Bob Sullivan, Joe McAfee, and Andy Natowich 
in top form . . . Flawless quarterbacking by 
Ray Ball, the unsung hero of the Holy Cross 
season ... a real iron-man . . . and most of 
all, top-notch coaching by Ank Scanlan and his 
entire staff . . . 55-12. Ah-h-h!!! 





Yacht Club 




Commodore Joe McCann 

The Holy Cross Yacht Club opened its 1942 
season by winning the New England Associa- 
tion Membership title at M. I. T. on April 19, 
1942. On May 13, the club defeated both B. C. 
and B. U. in a triangular meet on the Charles 
River. On the following day, the club de- 
feated M. I. T. in the first race, lost to Harvard 
by one point in the second race, and defeated 
Northeastern to win the third race of the day. 
From May 24 until June 23, the club competed 
in three races, winning two of them in the 
Charles River League. 



Oct. 25, Holy Cross successfully defended 
their New England Championship winning by 
a sizeable margin. The following week they 
took second out of 16 competing schools, los- 
ing first place to M. I. T. by one-half a point. 

At the M. I. T. invitation meet on Nov. 1, 
Holy Cross took second, losing first place to 
Harvard by two points, but defeating such 
schools as M. I. T., Brown, Dartmouth, Yale, 
and Coast Guard Academy. 

The following week at Brown University in 
a Women vs. Men regatta Holy Cross tied for 
first place with Pembroke and Rhode Island 
State. The 14th of Nov. the club completed a 
successful season by taking a sixth out of 
twelve positions in an invitation regatta at 
M. I. T. 

Much credit must be given to the club in its 
first year as a minor sport on the Hill, for al- 
though faced with grave problems in transpor- 
tation it got to the races, and rendered a good 
accounting of itself. 

Credit is due chiefly to Arthur Ogden, '44, 
Tom McDonald, '45, Ed Keating, '45, Joe Dee- 
gan, '45, Dick Galway, '46, and to Commo- 
dore Joe McCann, '43, who were the ones car- 
rying their pennant to victory for Holy Cross. 



BASKETBALL 




Vital factors in the building process of Holy 
Cross basketball have been three men of '43, 
Jim Scondras, Chet Gustowski and Connie 
McGillicuddy. Scondras' commendable work 
had merited his selection as co-captain for the 
coming campaign, before he was called into 
active service with the Marines. The other 
two members of the triumvirate, although not 
seeing as much service as the "Chief," cer- 
tainly deserve as much credit for lending all 
their talents. 

Although the outlook for the present season 
is still uncertain, a tentative all-major schedule 
has been arranged, and Coach Albert "Hop" 
Riopel expects to produce a bigger, faster, and 
smarter club than any of the previous Crusader 
quintets. Besides Capt. Steve Murphy, Gus- 
towski, and McGillicuddy, there is plenty of 
experienced material on hand, including Al 
Mazeika, Johnny Bezemes, and Jim Reilly. 
Among the newcomers are Bob Hogarty, 
George Connor, Joe Campbell, Bill Kellick and 
Dick Nolan. 

Whatever success the team may have will be 
due in a large measure to the spirit, the willing- 
ness, and the determination of Coach Riopel, 
Manager Charley Powers and all the players on 
the squad. 




Coach Hop Riopel 



Intramural Sports 








tf 



John P. Swords 
Manager 






Always the favorite activity on the Hill, In- 
tramural Sports have lost none of their popu- 
larity during the past year. The Spring Pro- 
gram, under the direction of Father Ott and 
genial Gus Cervini, took advantage of the long 
scholastic term to offer many attractions for the 
athletically-minded ... In the Fall we learned 
with regret that Father Ott had been transferred 
and that Mr. Cervini was leaving to accept a 








Jfcfc- 



Rev. Francis J. Hart, S.J. 

Moderator 




commission in the Naval Reserve. At the same 
time, however, we applauded the news that 
Father Hart would once again direct Intramural 
activities . . . Jack Swords was Senior Man- 
ager and Paul Murray Junior Assistant . . . 
Baseball and softball, the former an old favor- 
ite in Intramural circles and the latter a pop- 
ular newcomer, sustained interest during the 
Spring days when classes were in session. 

The baseball race was bitterly contested in 
both Leagues and no decision was reached until 
the final week of play. Dick Maxwell, '44, 
pitched his Carlin IIIB team to the top of 
League B, although the Worcester Seniors, Bob 
McCarthy, Art LaPlante, Paul Phipps, Ed Sta- 
ruk, Tom Hobin and Co., were ever dangerous. 
In League A, Carlin IIIA, Beaven III, and 
Wheeler I engaged in a three-cornered fight. 
Carlin IIIA, however, squeezed through to the 
League title by twice defeating Beaven. In the 
inter-League Playoff game, Carlin IIIA edged 
IIIB for the charms. For the winners Ed Mc- 
Grath, Jack and Jim Fitzgerald, "Ham" Lane, 
Jack Casey, Bob Lohr, Paul Murray, and Jack 
McGann were always brilliant. Dick Maxwell 
deserved plaudits for Carlin IIIB. Kev Mc- 
Carty, "Buster" Vocell, Bill Naylor, Johnny 






Williams, Ed Danowitz, Leo Ouellette, Jim 
Lynch, Connie McGillicuddy, Joe Bradbury, 
and Jim Byrne bore the Beaven standards, while 
Jim O'Brien, Len MacDowell, Joe Murphy, 
Jack Swords, Pete Saiano, Gene Lawless, Jim 
Stanard, Ty Keane, Joe Shelley, and Ed Har- 
rington toiled for Wheeler I . . . Carlin IIIA 
also captured honors in softball, downing Fen- 
wick IV in the Playoff clash. 

As usual, the Intramural football season was 
productive of good football and inspiring 



sportsmanship. Wheeler IV, League A cham- 
pions, continued its high standard of play in 
the "Money Series," defeating Carlin I, 19-6, 
in the final after two previous hard-fought bat- 
tles in the first round. For Wheeler IV Jack 
Swords, Jim O'Brien, Kev Mulcahy, Ade Mc- 
Namara, Joe Murphy, Dick Johnson, "Rocky" 
Schambach, Ray Curry, Gene Lawless, Jim Fair- 
clough, Len MacDowell, Connie McGillicuddy, 
Bill McKone, Joe Mendes, and Manager Jim 
Stanard carried the burden successfully. Basil 
Kaine, Jack Delaney, who was injured in the 
first round of the Playoffs, Bill Jahant, Ray Mil- 
nar, and Lou Gariepy were outstanding for the 
Carlin I Juniors. The other Senior teams in 
the Playoffs were Wheeler II, sparked by Bill 
McMahon, Vin McSweeney, Pete Saiano, Ryan 
Cuneo, Ray Reher, Art Murphy, Dan Moran, 
Ty Keane, and Larry Murphy; and Worcester 
Seniors, with Bill Morgan, Art LaPlante, and 
Paul Phipps starring. 

Wheeler IV captured the Fall Tennis Tour- 
nament by defeating Carlin I, 5-0, in the final 
rounds. Charm winners for the Wheeler 
champs were Jim Byrne, Jim Lynch, Johnny 
Williams, and Bill Larson ... In the annual 
Intramural Field Day competition Len Mac- 
Dowell, Art LaPlante, Bill Connolly, '45, Kev 



Mulcahy, and Jim Driscoll were awarded 
Charms ... As the Patcher goes to press, 
the basketball season is in full swing. Several 
Senior teams figure to be in the thick of the 
fight when the playoffs begin. Wheeler IV, 
with Kev Mulcahy, Jack Swords, Joe Lynch, 
Joe Murphy, Ray Curry, and Len MacDowell 
tossing baskets, are dangerous ; however, 
Wheeler II, Bill McMahon, Lou Gallulo, and 
Frank Kleniewski starring, is a pre-season 
favorite. 





FEATURES 



Thus was ii'oven the Purple's 
"gown of storied song.'' The 
golden jubilee was marked by the 
dedication of the statue of Our 
Lady, who note watches the snow 
and sunlight fall on the graves of 
her sons. On Memorial Day, 
1905. Fitton Field was dedicated. 
In 1927 the cornerstone of Din- 
and Library was laid. So the 
College grew; and the dream of 
Bishop Fenwick. though he sleeps 
these hundred years, has become 
a resplendent reality. 




H °IY CROSS CBN 




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Wilkie lost 




r urinations HE '^jj 




Superlatively 



BESTS 

Did Most for Holy Cross 
Did Most for Class 
Most Learned 
Best Ail-Around Athlete 

Varsity 

Intramural 
Best Military Man 
Best Orator 
Best Debater 
Best Prose Writer 
Best Poet 

Best Business Man 
Best Musician 
Best-Natured 
Best-Informed 
Most Popular 
Most Versatile 



Johnny Grigas 

Steve Barone 

John R. McCarthy 



Most Modest 
Most Reliable 

Most Handsome 
Most Excitable 
Most Loquacious 
Hardest Worker 
Wittiest 
Quietest 

Ideal Holy Cross Man 
Social Lion 
Best Dancer 
Most Entertaining 
Best Artist 
Best Actor 

Most Likely to Succeed 
Most Modern 
Most Argumentative 
Most Optimistic 
Best Singer 
Biggest "Swing Fan" 
Luckiest 

Best Comedian Dick Dubord 
Bob Smith 



Johnny Bezemes 
Bill McMahon 
Pete Maurano 
Gene Lawless 
Marty Conroy 
Marty Conroy 
Ed Danowitz 
Jack Ryan 
Dick Dubord 

Tom Alberghini 
Gene Lawless 

Vin McSweeney 

Kev McCarty ) 

_ T , v ex aequo 
Gene Lawless \ 

Tom Alberghini 

Bill Larson J 

Tom Meath | 

Vin McSweeney 

John J. McCarty 

Ed Lynch 

Paul Gleason 

Jim Jahant 

Bill FitzGerald 

Jim Fairclough 

Kev McCarty 

Buster Vocell 

Bob Smith 

Ken Fisher 

Steve Barone 

Bill Larson 

Bob Fullan 

John J. McCarthy 

Paul Doran 

Dick Johnson 

Johnny Williams 

Jack Sweeney 



aequo 



S P 



i n 



FAVORITES 

Senior Professor 

Rev. Harold V. Stockman, S.J. 

Underclass Professor 

Rev. Leo A. O'Connor, S.J. 

College Course Ethics 

Novel "The Keys of the Kingdom" 



Author 

Movie 

Opera 

Magazine 

Career 

Undergraduate 

Ex-Man 

Greatest Need 

Women's College 

Movie Actor 

Movie Actress 

Employee 

Orchestra 

Pastime 

Cigarette 

Singer 

Songstress 

Humorist 

Radio Program 

Pet Peeve 

Rendezvous 



A. J. Cronin 

"Mrs. Miniver" 

"Carmen" 

Reader's Digest 

Military 

Basil Kaine 

Lt. Richard Dobbyn 

Gymnasium 

Regis 

Spencer Tracy 

Bette Davis 

Fuzzy Coleman 

Harry James 

Grouping 

Chesterfield 

Bing Crosby 

Helen O'Connell 

Bop Hope 

Fred Waring 

Bells 

The Eden 



Men's College (other than H. C.) 

Notre Dame 
College Organization Musical Clubs 

College Activity Intramural Sports 

World Figure Franklin D. Roosevelt 

Military Figure Gen. Douglas MacArthur 
Comic Strip Terry and the Pirates 

Sports Columnist John Kieran 

Professional Athlete Bill Osmanski 

Meal in Kimball Steak 



Sport : 




As Participator 


Baseball 


As Spectator 


Football 




Acknowledgments 



The editor and staff wish to take this opportunity to express their appreciation to all 
those without whose assistance a volume of this scope could never have been produced. 
We offer our gratitude especially: 

To Rev. Joseph D. FitzGerald, S.J., Dean of the College, who as Moderator of the 
Centennial Purple Patcher gave generously of his time and advice. His tireless efforts 
on behalf of the yearbook proved to be of valuable assistance. 

To Rev. Leo A. Shea, S.J., for his willing co-operation in the matter of identifying 
Underclassmen. 

To Mr. Raymond D. Kennedy, Registrar, for the use of his valuable records. 

To Rev. Leo A. O'Connor, S.J., for his assistance to the Research Editor in compiling 
old views for the historic section of this volume. 

To Mr. Joseph A. Perrotta, Alumni Executive Secretary, for the Centennial seal and 
for many of the old photographs. 

To Rev. Walter J. Meagher, S.J., whose history of Holy Cross served as a source for 
our own history, which is carried through the divider pages. 

To Rocky Schambach and Joe Daly, for their efficient management of our Patcher 
Dance,, which alleviated our financial burden immensely. 

To the Stobbs Press for the excellence of the printing which appears on these pages; 
to Mr. Russell C. Knight for his co-operative understanding and for the excellence of his 
artistic contributions; to Mr. William J. O'Connor for his helpful assistance during our 
most trying days and for his sense of honesty and of good business. 

To the Loring Studios for the fine quality of their photography ; to Mr. Robert 
Mercer and Mr. Carl Mattson for their eagerness to render exceptional service. 

To the Wiley-Whitney Co. for the excellence of our engravings; to Mr. Wiley and 
Mr. Whitney for their prompt deliveries. 

To the Bachrach Studios for the photograph of Very Rev. Joseph R. N. Maxwell, S.J. 

To Messrs. Moses H. Williams, Roy Mumpton, and William C. Chaplis of the 

Worcester Telegram for most of the action phorcgraphs which enhance our football 
section. 

To the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin for the photographs of the Temple football 
game. 

To the Providence Journal for the photographs of the Brown football game. 

To the Molloy Cover Co. for their excellent interpretation of our Centennial theme. 

To Bill Earls and Miss Carpenter for their helpful secretarial service. 

To Ted McCabe and Tom Neligon for their unselfish typing efforts. 

To Ray Ghelardi and Charley Chagnon, whose snapshots appear in this volume. 

Lo the entire student body for their cooperation, and especially to the Senior Class 
for their promptness in appearing for sittings. 

lo our advertisers, without whose generous assistance the Centennial Purple 
Patcher would be but a beautiful dream. 






ADVERTISEMENTS 




Thompson's 

Lunch 

"At The Bottom of The Hill" 

The Personnel at Thompson's wishes to extend 

their heartiest congratulations to the Class 

of '43. May their future be one of 

Health, Happiness and 

Prosperity 


1858 1942 

E. T. SMITH COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

84 Years Serving 

Institutions — Hotels — Restaurants 


WISHING SUCCESS TO THE CLASS 
OF 1943 

* 

WAITE HARDWARE CO. 

189 Front Street 


Compliments of 

WARE PRATT CO. 

OUTFITTERS TO 
MEN AND YOUNG MEN 

Main St. at Pearl . . . "Quality Corner" 


DIAMONDS WATCHES JEWELRY 

GOLDSTEIN, SWANK & GORDON 
COMPANY 

Jewelers for Over Thirty Years 

CLASS RINGS FOR ALL YEARS 
405 Main Street Two Flights Up 







'ons to the 



Class of 1943 



VINCENT BARONE 





Compliments of 


Compliments of 


MAYFLOWER DOUGHNUT 


A FRIEND 


SHOP 




517 MAIN STREET 


BROCKELMAN BROS.. Inc. 




FOOD MERCHANTS 




WORCESTER MARKET 


Compliments of 


MAIN AND MADISON STREETS 


FARRELL CLEANERS 


FRONT ST. MARKET 




242 FRONT STREET 


748 SOUTHBRIDGE STREET 


LINCOLN SQ. MARKET 




12 LINCOLN SQUARE 




"For Occasions That Count" 


• • • • 


HOTEL BANCROFT 


Professional handling of 


all details for meeting. 


banquet, dance or bridge. 


• • • * 


Air Conditioned 


RESTAURANT — BAR LOUNGE — CAFETERIA 


Maurice T. Lawler, Manager 











^yilways someining different 






voiin slvle and good lasle 






• 






This 1943 Edition of the 






Holy Cross Purple Patcher 






was completely designed, en- 






graved and printed — indivi- 






dually for The Purple Patcher 






Staff by the Stobbs Press 






Craftsmen. 






"For more than sixty years — 






Stobbs Press Craftsmen have produced fine printing." 






THE s^^tc>V>K>$ PRESS 






( 

Worcester, Massachusetts 











A good store . . . 
growing better 
every day! 



Famous for 
over seventy 
years for 
Quality and 
Style 



DENHOLM McKAY CO, 



'Worcester s Leading Store' 



Congratulations 



ON BEING 



100 YEARS "YOUNG' 




JEWELERS 
OPTICIANS 



521 MAIN STREET 




HEY! 

what's he 

GOT THAT 
WE HAVENT? 





On campuses the country over, Douglas 
Shoes are '"first" with well-dressed col- 
lege men. Why? Because they're made 
on lasts that really fit, styled for good 
looks, and backed by a 66-year-old tradi- 
tion of fine shoe craftsmanship. Stop in 
at the Douglas Store today and see for 
yourself. 



Douglas "Down-to-the 
Wood" construction 
assures better fit — 
greater comfort. 



W. L DOUGLAS SHOE CO 

364 Main Street 

Opposite Foster St., ^ orcester, Mass. 
AMERICA'S BEST-KNOWN SHOES 



SAVING WISELY 

To those of you going into the armed services, we interpret 
our job here at home as strong advocators of savings, of less 
spending for unnecessary purchases, and more buying of War 
Bonds. 

Each Savings Bank regularly invests a large part of its own 
funds and those of its depositors in government bonds which, 

in turn, aid the war program. Perhaps 
this effort may help to bring closer the 
end of the war. 



BUY WAR BONDS AT YOUR 
SAVINGS BANK 



The Mutual Savings Banks of Worcester 

WORCESTER COUNTY INSTITUTION FOR SAVINGS 
WORCESTER FIVE CENTS SAVINGS BANK WORCESTER MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

PEOPLE'S SAVINGS BANK BAY STATE SAVINGS BANK 




WORCESTER TELEGRAM 
SUNDAY TELEGRAM 
THE EVENING GAZETTE 

• 
RADIO STATION WTAG 


Compliments of 

HASTINGS DRUG CO. 

434 Slater Building Worcester, Mass. 

* 

''The House That Prescriptions Built" 


Compliments of 

PURPLE CLEANERS 
AND DYERS 

614-622 SOUTHBRIDGE STREET 
Dial 5 6983 


Compliments of 

STRAND BOWLING 
ACADEMY 

9 NORWICH STREET, WORCESTER. MASS. 

Thomas Conroy. Daniel Keough, Managers 










KBWICTORY 

Qr^ui UNITED 
Vf'flU STATES 

JjniMvAR 

rJIjjMV STAMPS 




WASHINGTON PRESS 

of W orcester, Incorporated 

17 FEDERAL STREET. WORCESTER. MASS. 
Producers of Impressive Printing 
Both Offset and Letterpress 

Printers of THE TOMAHAWK 


- 














• 




COMPLIMENTS OF 

Central Building 
332 Main Street 
Worcester, Mass. 

Photographer for the Class 0/1943 


f 








5rai 



e conoratvuate tne 



lede Hi 




euioi* ^/ictss 




JUNIOR CLASS 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

FRESHMAN CLASS 




Americas 

wei o fairpmteetion 



Two years ago, England's flying men saved their 
country from invasion. The R. A. F. was able to 
maintain superiority in the air because factories 
on the ground continued their all-out production 
. . . beneath a protective web of barrage balloons, 
which kept enemy bombers too high for destruc- 
tive accuracy. 

Our government then took steps to provide similar 
protection to our industries and our military objec- 
tives . . . assigning the task of building barrage 
balloons to The General Tire & Rubber Company. 

Starting from "scratch". . . in a totally new endeavor 
. . . General's balloon plant is now working twenty- 
four hours a day, seven days a week. 

General's men, who have spent their lives in rubber, 
are deep in research, experiment and production 
also on numerous other war materials. 

America has just so much rubber with which to win 
the war. Half of that rubber is now in use on civilian 
cars and trucks. It is up to you — and all of us — 
to make our irreplaceable tires last through to 
Victory. Our armed forces must get the rubber they 



need. Our War Production Program must continue 
all-out. Tire abuse and neglect or excessive speed 
on the home-front cannot be permitted to waste a 
single mile of our precious rubber. 

THE GENERAL TIRE & RUBBER CO. • Akron, Ohio 

COPYRIGHT 1942, THE GENERAL TIRE & RUBBER CO., AKRON, OHIO 




The Sign of 
Tire Inspection, 
Repairs and 
Recapping by 
Experts Who 
Know How 



I